REGIONAL OPERATIONS MANUAL OF THE AFRICA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE FOR DEVELOPMENT IMPACT (ACE IMPACT)

DECEMBER 15, 2020
 
FOR 11AFRICAN COUNTRIES
(BENIN, BURKINA FASO, COTE D’IVOIRE, DJIBOUTI, GAMBIA, GHANA, GUINEA, NIGER, NIGERIA, SENEGAL, TOGO)

  1. THE PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE OPERATIONS MANUAL
  2. PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES
    a) The Project Development Objectives
    b) Project Beneficiaries
    c) Key Indicators
  3. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF COMPONENTS
    a) Component 1: Establishing new and scaling-up well-performing existing ACEs (from ACE I) for development impact
    b) Component 2: Fostering Regional Partnerships and Scholarships
    c) Component 3: Enhancing National and Regional Level Project Facilitation and Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E)
  4. INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE OPERATION OF THE ACE IMPACT PROJECT
    a) Key Roles and Responsibilities at the National Level
    b) Key Roles and Responsibilities at the Regional Level
    • Regional ACE Impact Project Steering Committee
    • Regional Facilitation Unit
    • Regional Coordination and Facilitation
    • The Goal of the RFU
    • The Role of the RFU
    • The Role of the ACEs
    • Table 4.a: ACE Impact AFD team contacts
  5. MONITORING AND EVALUATION ARRANGEMENTS
    a) Purpose and Objective b) Scope of M&E Arrangements c) Preparations for Monitoring and Evaluation d) Key Performance Indicators and Targets e) Roles and Responsibilities
  6. VERIFICATION OF DISBURSEMENT LINKED RESULTS
  7. PROJECT FINANCING
  8. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND DISBURSEMENT
    a) General Guidelines for process for first disbursement for the Africa Centres of Excellence for Development Impact
    b) General funds flow arrangement
    c) Funds Flow Arrangements of ACE Impact Project in Nigeria
    d) Guidelines for processing first disbursement for the Africa Centres of Excellence for Development Impact Project in Nigeria
    e) Funds Flow Arrangements in Ghana
    f) General Guidelines for process for first disbursement for the ACE in Ghana
  9. PROCUREMENT
    ANNEX 1: TERMS OF REFERENCE (TORs) OF PROJECT COMMITTEES
    ANNEX 1.A: TORs OF NATIONAL REVIEW COMMITTEE
    ANNEX 1.B: TORs FOR ACE IMPACT STEERING COMMITTEE (SC)
    ANNEX 2: REGIONAL FACILITATION UNIT-TERMS OF REFERENCE
    ANNEX 3: ACE IMPACT COUNTRY FOCAL POINT - TORs
    ANNEX 4: ACE IMPACT SUBJECT MATTER EXPERTS – TORs AND SUPERVISION MISSION
    ANNEX 5: COVID-19 PROJECT PARAMETERS UPDATES
    ANNEX 6: ACE IMPACT PARTNERSHIP DOCUMENTATION
    ANNEX 6.A: PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT TEMPLATE
    ANNEX 6.B: PARTNERSHIP ACTION PLAN
    ANNEX 6.C: PARTNERSHIP BUDGET
    ANNEX 6.D: RESULTS FRAMEWORK AND MONITORING (NOTE THIS IS A SUB-COMPONENT OF THE OVERALL PROJECT RESULTS FRAMEWORK)
    ANNEX 6.E: GUIDELINES FOR ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIPS
    ANNEX 7: DATA VERIFICATION TERMS OF REFERENCE
    ANNEX 8: ACE IMPACT IMPLEMENTATION PLAN TEMPLATE
    ANNEX 9: MILESTONES FORMULATION FOR DLR 4.3 – IMPROVED TEACHING AND LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
    ANNEX 10: ACE IMPACT DLI FINANCING BY CENTERS
1. THE PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE OPERATIONS MANUAL
1. The “Project Regional Operations Manual” (OM) for the First and Second Africa Higher Education Centers of Excellence for Development Impact (1st and 2nd ACE Impact) projects is defined in the Financing Agreements between the Receipiant Countries and the World Bank, as the manual to be adopted by the projects’ Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) and communicated to the participating countries for the implementation of the projects, including, inter alia: (i) the terms of reference, functions and responsibilities for the members or the personel of the Regional Project Steering Committee (PSC) and RFU; (ii) the procedures for procurement of goods, non-consulting services, consultants’ services, Operating Costs, and training, financial management and audits; (iii) the indicators for monitoring and evaluation; (iv) the terms of reference for the Independent Verifiers; (v) the detailed content of the EEP Spending Reports; (vi) the Disbursement-Linked-Indicators (DLIs) and -results (DLRs); and (vii) the grievance mechanisms.

2. The OM may be amended from time to time by the projects’ RFU (AAU) with prior written approval from the World Bank
2. PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES
a) The Project Development Objectives:
3. The Project Development Objective (PDO) is to improve the quality, quantity and development impact of postgraduate education in selected universities through regional specialization and collaboration. In this respect, the Project will support the 12 Recipient Countries to promote regional specialization among participating universities in thematic areas that address regional challenges and strengthen the capacities of these universities to deliver quality training and applied research.

4. The overarching objective is to meet the demands of the labour market for skills and applied research in specific priority sectors, where there are shortages affecting development outcomes and economic growth.

b) Project Beneficiaries:
5. The beneficiaries of the Projects are: i. Students in the selected centers and those enrolled in the host institutions of the centers, as well as students in partner institutions across West and Central Africa and Djibouti. Further, current and future students will have an expanded choice of quality and development-related education programs within West and Central Africa;
ii. Faculty and staff from the centers, host institutions and partner institutions who improve their qualifications and teaching and research conditions;
iii. Employers and other knowledge partners, including Ministries and public entities, who will have easier access to highly skilled professionals and to applied research for solutions to pressing development challenges; and
iv. The general population in West and Central Africa and Djibouti who will benefit from a network of dynamic university centers focused on the generation of skills and applied research to drive development.

c) Key Indicators:
6. The following indicators will measure progress towards achieving the PDO:
• Number of students (national and regional) enrolled in postgraduate programmes in the selected ACEs (Quantity of Education & Regional Specialization).
• Number of ACE programmes and ACE host institutions that obtain international accreditation (Quality of Education).
• Number of ACEs that have substantial development impact (as measured by an independent evaluation of each centre’s impact on development at mid-term and end of project).
• Percentage of ACE host institutions with a comprehensive strategic plan for regionalization (Regional Specialization and Collaboration).
• Number of students and faculty participating in internships and/or apprenticeships in relevant industry/sector institutions (Development Impact of Education).
3. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF COMPONENTS
7. The two projects covered under this OM are the 1st ACE Impact and 2nd ACE Impact Projects. Both projects have the same technical design, including common evaluation and selection schedule and processes, this project operational manual (OM), as well as implementation arrangement structures. The regional facilitation unit (RFU), which will be hosted at the Association of African Universities (AAU), will be responsible for regional coordination and monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities for both projects (it will be financed under the 1st ACE Impact project through a regional grant).

8. The primary differences between the two projects are: the list of participating countries; and the preparation schedule. The 1st ACE Impact project countries were selected based on the following criteria: (i) country readiness, (ii) expressed interest – countries that expressed interest in participating in the project first are prioritized; and (iii) planned elections – those countries with planned elections in February – March 2019 were also prioritized. The 1st ACE Impact countries and entities include: Burkina Faso, Djibouti, Ghana, Guinea, Senegal and AAU. Specifically, under the 1st ACE Impact, there are 16 (6 renewals) ACEs; 2 Emerging Centers and 3 Colleges of Engineering. Additionally, there are 2 National Facilitation Agencies (National Council for Tertiary Education (NCTE) in Ghana and an implementation unit under the Ministère de l'Enseignement Supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation, MMERSRI-PIU in Burkina Faso), and 1 Regional Facilitation Unit (AAU). The 2nd ACE Impact countries and entities include: Benin, Cote d’Ivoire, Niger, Nigeria, The Gambia, and Togo. Specifically, under the 2nd ACE Impact, there are 28 ACEs; 3 Emerging Centers and 3-6 Colleges of Engineering, 1 National Facilitation Agency (the National Universities Commissio (NUC) in Nigeria), and an implementation unit under the Ministère de l'Enseignement Supérieur et de la Recherche Scientifique in Cote d’Ivoire.

9. The project consists of three components.
• Component 1: Establishing new and scaling-up well-performing existing ACEs (from ACE I) for development impact;
• Component 2: Fostering regional partnerships and scholarships; and
• Component 3: Enhancing national and regional project facilitation and, monitoring and evaluation (M&E).

10. Component 1 will aim to strengthen capacity in the ACEs and their host institutions (supply-side); Component 2 will aim to strengthen non-ACE institutions in the region and allow students to benefit from the capacity in the ACEs (demand-side). Component 3 will aim to support national and regional facilitation of the project and M&E related activities. Financing for Component 1 and 2 will be result-based, while financing for Component 3 will be cost-based.

a) Component 1: Establishing new and scaling-up well-performing existing ACEs (from ACE I) for development impact

11. Component 1 aims to build and strengthen the capacity of 44 competitively selected centers and 7 Schools of Engineering located in higher education institutions across West and Central Africa. Component 1 has two sub-components: Sub-component 1.1 will support new ACE Impact centers and Sub-component 1.2 will provide additional support to well performing ACE I centers.

Sub-component 1.1: Support to establish new centers of excellence
12. Sub-component 1.1 will establish twenty-six (26) new ACE Impact centers and increase the number of quality centers and relevant programs offered in the region and to introduce new thematic areas that do not exist in ACE I. All ACE Impact I countries, except Djibouti, will have an ACE Impact center. This sub-component will fund new centers between US$4 million and US$8 million (average US$5.3 million) to each center to fund its activities. The funding allocation to each center depends on the thematic area, the overall funding needs indicated in the center’s proposal, the funding envelope of the center’s government and the government’s priorities. The release of funds will be linked to the achievement of seven DLIs: (a) Institutional readiness results (DLI1); (b) development impact of the ACE Impact Center (DLI2); (c) quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization (DLI3); (d) quality of education and research through international accreditation, research publication and improved teaching and research infrastructure (DLI4); (e) relevance of education and research through externally generated revenue internships and entrepreneurship (DLI5); (f) timeliness and quality of fiduciary management (DLI6); and (g) Institutional impact- to be accomplished by the ACE host institution (DLI 7). The disbursement amount by result is uniform across centers and countries for DLI3, DLI4, DLI5, and DLI 7, because a unit cost can reasonably be established for these results, for instance unit cost for a student or a research publication. Disbursement amounts for DLI1, DLI2, and DLI6 differ by center because they are relative to the center’s funding envelope, because the results are related to the overall performance of the center, notably implementation readiness, impact of center and fiduciary management.
Sub-component 1.2: Support to scale-up well performing ACE I centers

13. Sub-component 1.2 aims to provide additional funding and support to eighteen (18) existing ACEs (currently supported under the ACE I project) to enable them to scale-up their activities and deepen their development impact. Funding under this sub-component will help these centers to: strengthen productive partnerships with industry, sectoral stakeholders, ministries and policymakers; boost their regional leadership of regional networks; allow centers to lead efforts in the training of quality postgraduate students and maintain their international accreditation; and act as drivers of applied research solutions to development challenges in the region. The funding to renewed centers are from US$2 million – US$ 4.5 million, with an average funding of US$3.6 million. This is equivalent to approximately half the amount of funding previously provided under ACE I, with the expectation that most of these centers will not require capital intensive civil works at the levels they needed in ACE I. Further, these ACEs will be supported to increase their fundraising efforts to become fully sustainable after this round of funding. The allocation to each center depended upon the thematic area, overall funding needs indicated in the center’s proposal, the funding envelope of the center’s government, and the government’s priorities. While the release of funds will be linked to the achievement of the same seven DLIs listed under Sub-component 1.1 above, the DLI amounts for each center under this Sub-component 1.2 will vary between ACEs to customize to the center-specific objectives.

Additional support for Social and Environmental Risk Management Training

14. Burkina Faso will give add-on funding of US$2.5 million to an ACE Impact center under Component 1 to develop and offer training in Social and Environmental Risk Management. The center will achieve its objectives through: (i) creating a regional network of academics and practitioners in social and environment risk management; (ii) conducting training for agencies of infrastructure and natural resources projects; and (iii) facilitating regional sharing of experiences and learning in safeguards risk management, grievance redress mechanisms (GRMs) and benefit-sharing. Graduates will be equipped with comprehensive and interdisciplinary knowledge in environmental and social sustainability and will deepen their understanding of the role of environmental and social risk assessment and management in project development and implementation.

Additional support to engineering and technology ACE host institutions
15. Seven institutions that are selected to host an engineering or technology-focused centers with capacity in other engineering disciplines will receive additional funding in Ghana, Benin, Burkina Faso, Djibouti and Nigeria. This funding will support an institution-wide strengthening of the engineering and technology programs within their College or School of Engineering (CoEngg). The CoEngg are expected to achieve DLIs just as its ACE/Emerging center to incentivize the scaling-up of enrollment of undergraduates (including enrollment of females); achieving international quality standards; introducing new academic programs; promoting project-based learning and innovative pedagogy; establishing new laboratories; enabling technology transfer and business/entrepreneurship; building linkages to business programs; and enhancing teaching and research capacity; and promoting institutional transformation in terms of policies and operations. This type of support did not exist under ACE I or ACE II.

16. The renewal and new beneficiary institutions were selected through an open, rigorous, transparent and merit-based selection process. The selection process entailed the following main steps: (i) call for proposals to institutions; (ii) submission of Center of Excellence proposals through their respective governments to the Association of African Universities, the regional facilitation unit (105 proposals were submitted); and (iii) a systematic and detailed evaluation of proposals by 49 independent African and international experts according to pre-defined criteria. The evaluation consisted of three different and discrete sets of assessments including (a) desk reviews in which each proposal was reviewed by two experts in Accra, Ghana; (b) external evaluation in which each proposal was remotely assessed by a subject matter specialist, and (c) a site & leadership evaluation in which a team of experts visited shortlisted proposal sites to ascertain the readiness of the institutions in terms of governance, leadership, and infrastructure.

17. The final selection of the centres was contingent upon: (i) the approval of the financing from the external financiers (World Bank and the French Development Agency (AFD)) and availability of sufficient financing for all the proposals; (ii) the selected universities incorporated the recommendations of the evaluators into their implementation plans, and (iii) the universities demonstrated sufficient capacity to manage the funds for their intended purpose. The selected centres depicted below (Table 3b) met all these conditions and subsequently got the approval from World Bank.

18. The selected institutions under component 1 will implement their own ACE Impact project aiming to help address a specific regional development challenge through preparation of professionals (education), applied research and associated outreach activities to partners. Each ACE Impact centre will have an implementation team established to manage the project on a day-to-day basis. Each centre will be responsible for its own strategic and implementation plans, fiduciary and M&E activities. The team will be led by the centre director, who will be a recognized educator/researcher with expertise in the academic focus area of the centre. The centre director will be supported by a deputy director and faculty from all departments contributing to the centre. Each centre team will also consist of key staff members specializing in procurement, FM, M&E, communications and an industry engagement who will support the centre’s day-to day operations and assist with fiduciary tasks. The host university will provide to the centres administrative support and assistance on the safeguards tools to be developed by the centres.

19. The institutions will have the responsibility to implement their own institutional specific ACE Impact projects which encompass the following five broad elements:
(i) Enhance capacity to deliver regional high quality training to address the development challenge.
(ii) Enhance capacity to deliver applied research to address the regional development challenge.
(iii) Build and use industry/sector partnerships to enhance impact of the Centre on development and increase relevance of the Centres education and research.
(iv) Build and strengthen regional and international academic partnerships to raise quality of education in other institutions in the region.
(v) Enhance governance and management to improve monitoring and evaluation, administration, fiduciary management, transparency, ability to generate resources, and project implementation.

20. These five sets of project activities are closely intertwined. For instance, industry partnership and academic partnership are necessary inputs into enhanced capacity to deliver high quality training. On the other hand, high quality training is a key factor in successful industry and academic partnerships. The following discusses activities related to each of the five set of priorities in greater detail:
(i) Enhance capacity to deliver regional high-quality training

21. These activities aim to raise the capacity of the ACE Impact centres to form a cadre of professionals with cutting-edge conceptual and hands-on competences to address the development challenge of the centres. The three key indicators for measuring progress towards achieving the goal of delivering regional high quality training will be: (a) Number of regional and national students enrolled in short-term specialized courses and in bachelor, master and PhD degree programmes; and (b) Number of education programmes under the centre of excellence that meet international quality benchmarks; and (c) externally generated revenue.

22. This will be achieved by implementation of the institutional plan, designed by the institution and reviewed by external experts, to develop and strengthen academic programmes in the ACEs. The plan consists of an institutional specific mix of the following activities: (i) developing and offering specialized short-term education programes aimed at industry professionals for further development; (ii) developing and offering of specialized Master and PhD level programmes; increasing quality and relevance of existing teaching through revision of curricula and teaching-methods based upon industry professional standards; incentivize faculty for good performance, including incentives for research and awards for top teaching. Only non-monetary incentives to faculty to achieve the objective of the proposal can be funded by the ACE grant. The project does not restrict the use of other generated revenue; (iii) improvement of laboratories, classrooms, computers, and other teaching facilities through equipment purchases and limited civil works. Civil works will be limited to 25 percent of the expected costs of the ACE, and should only finance construction

23. of rehabilitation of buildings and minor extensions of buildings; (iv) establishing international benchmarking and accreditation of education programs; (v) teaching-learning improvement programmes to upgrade teaching capacity and provide cutting-edge student-centred teaching; and (vi) upgrade faculty qualifications. Institutions are not constrained by the above list of suggestive activities. Other activities could be permissible for funding as laid out within the Project Regional Operations Manual. Lastly, activities under research, industry/sector partnerships, academic partnerships, and governance and administrative strengthening, will equally contribute to strengthening of the Centres’ educational capacity.

(ii) Enhance Capacity to produce and communicate applied research at the regional level

24. These activities aim to raise the capacity of the ACEs to conduct industry-relevant applied research. The key indicator for measuring progress towards achieving the related result will be the Number of published research outputs and generation of revenue. This will be achieved by carrying out an institutional specific mix of the following activities: (a) Purchase and improvement of research facilities and research material; (b) Incentivize research and publications (non-monetary incentives as discussed above); (c) increase in Master and PhD students, including potential scholarship awards, if necessary, to attract young talent. The project strongly encourages ACEs to prioritize any scholarships for degree courses to young graduates over mid-career faculty members; (d) assistance in relevant trainings for staff and students, including grant proposal writing and publication preparations, such as in translation and editorial support; (e) participating in, and organizing of, conferences and seminars for presentation of research; (f) faculty exchanges with other research institutions, (g) access to resource material, include library material and access to e-journals; (h) costs associated with research collaboration; and (i) minor civil works to improve research facilities.

(iii) Regional and international academic partnerships

25. Academic Partnerships serve to make the Centre of Excellence a nodal point that connects globally and disseminates regionally in West and Central Africa, and beyond. The ACE Impact projects have identified a record number of academic partners at the regional and international levels. The focus on strengthening such partnerships under this component will serve three main objectives: (i) increasing the capacity of partner institutions in the region to deliver quality education and conduct research; (ii) raising the Centres’ educational and research capacity through drawing upon partnership with international leading institutions within the same domain, and (iii) build upon the strengths of national and regional institutions –sharing of unique physical and faculty resources- to create synergies and thereby raise quality of education and research.

26. The key indicators for measuring progress towards achieving the related result increased national and regional impact through institutional collaboration at the regional level will be as follows: (i) share of regional (non-national) students enrolled in ACEs and regional faculty, and (ii) regional research publications. Further, intermediate indicators will measure different aspects of the partnership agreements.

27. The ACEs have partnered with institutions that have or need capacity to produce skills to address a particular development challenge. This includes similar international academic centres globally, universities in the region, and national and regional research institutions. In particular, collaboration with regional research institutions is critical within agriculture and health where substantial academic capacity is located outside universities in sector-specific research institution. The partnerships can be continuation of on-going partnerships and/or new partnerships.

28. The academic partnership activities include: Collaboration in delivery of education programmes, faculty development programmes for regional faculty, joint conferences, joint research, sharing access to specialized research, learning equipment and library resources (giving students and faculty exposure to different learning environment and equipment), student and faculty exchange, joint organization of specific courses for example at the post-graduate level. Selected institutions will continue to revise and update the academic partnership action plan following the evaluation comments, including consideration of new partners.

29. Academic partnership agreements should be developed by the ACEs in close collaboration with their partners. In the case of consortiums that form the ACE, a partnership agreement should be co-developed and co-signed by all major partners. These consortium type ACEs will include these agreements as part of the performance and funding contract to be signed with the Government. Funds for capacity building in partner institutions will be held and managed by the ACE Impact centre/institution leading the network/consortium. All fiduciary and M&E matters related to the use of these funds will fall under the purview of the ACE Impact centres. The academic partnership action plan will be reviewed and revised at mid-term.

(iv) Build and use regional and national industry/sector partnerships

30. The key objective of these activities will be twofold: (a) provide skills and knowledge to address the development challenge (putting higher education to work), and (b) benefit the Centre of Excellence through improved relevance of the Centre’s teaching-learning and applied research. The key indicators for measuring progress towards achieving the related result are: Number of Students and Faculty with at least 1 month collaboration/internship in a company or a sector institution; and externally generated revenue.

31. These objectives will be reached through partnering with industry/sectoral institutions, including companies and service delivery institutions that work to address the development challenge that the Centre is focused on. In this context, industry then should be interpreted broadly to include institutions that work in the economic sector of the development challenge, including for example public teaching hospitals for health and famer associations for agriculture, and not just private companies, such as manufacturing or mining companies. Also, these partnerships are both national and/or regional in nature. Partnerships with key national and regional industry associations or other important players are a strong indication of the potential relevance and impact of the ACE. In some ACEs, industry partnerships are also with lower-level industry/sector-specific training institutions, such as institutions that provide technicians education, midwifery education, or farmers’ extension service training.

32. Each institution will implement its action plan for industry/sectoral partnerships (as designed in its proposal and subsequent revisions), one that is tailored to its specific development challenge, its existing industry partnerships, and new opportunities for partnerships. These activities could be a combination of: (a) industry-lectures; (b) master and PhD thesis based upon industrial research with companies; (c) advisory boards, (d) placement of students and fairs; industry-outreach cell to promote industry partnerships and liaise with industry. These industry partnership activities are closely linked with the education and research activities, in the sense that the partnership activities could include training of industry professionals, for example training-the-trainers programmes, and joint research. The main industry/sectoral partnerships will be defined in MoUs at the onset, and the plans will be updated at mid-term review.

(v) Improving governance and administration of the institution and the ACEs

33. The key indicator for measuring progress towards achieving the related result on Improved Governance of ACEs are: Improved institutional monitoring of fiduciary responsibility, notably, a functioning internal audit unit and a functioning audit committee in the Board of the Institution, timely unqualified audits, and procurement verification and progress reporting. Further, regularity and transparency of decision making and planning are two intermediate indicators.

34. Activities to achieve strengthening governance and administrative capacity of the institution may include the following elements: (a) implementation of new and/or improved grants management, procurement, and monitoring procedures; (b) hiring or training of existing personnel for identifying grants opportunities, management, procurement, and monitoring; (c) hiring and training for fund raising; (d) improving board procedures – having regular meetings, strengthening the audit committee of the board, review board membership to include external members such as private sector representatives, and openly disclose board meeting minutes for greater transparency; (e) establishing internal evaluation procedures towards quality control; (f) supporting reporting on lessons-learnt in implementing the programs and making these available to regional bodies aggregating this information and partners.

(vi) Performance and Funding Contract and related financing parameters

35. Each selected institution will sign a performance and funding contract with the government which states the grant is subject to the following few financial parameters: (i) At least 15 percent of the funding must be invested in the partnerships under a related partnership agreement(s), (ii) Up to 10 percent of the amount of funding will go towards the ACE host institution’s activities which will be included in the implementation plan and annual workplans of the ACE; (iii) civil works will be limited to 25 percent of the grant; (iv) the project cannot finance monetary incentives of faculty, administrative personnel or public employees; and (v) purchases of vehicles must be explicitly included in the approved annual workplan in order to be eligible and must not exceed one bus and one car per ACE Impact centre. The funding and performance agreement will also include the government’s indicative planned funding of institutional staff during the project.

36. At mid-term, expected to be two years after signing the performance contract, there will be a thorough evaluation of performance. The grant amount to each ACE Impact centre and its usage will be reviewed, and can be adjusted. In particular, it is expected that ACEs that are behind in implementation will see their grant be reduced by 50% of the uncommitted amount that is above half of their grant. The additional funding would be made available to the institutions performing well. These reductions in grant amounts seek to reduce the risk of large committed funds to institutions that are slow in achieving implementation results.

b) Component 2: Fostering Regional Partnerships and Scholarships

37. This component will focus on the Support to Emerging Centres of Excellence for networking, regional technical assistance and improving learning environment (Sub-component 2.1); and Support for PhD scholarships through the PASET Regional Scholarship & Innovation Fund (Sub-component 2.2). The aim is to expand the regional impact of the ACEs funded under Component 1 by providing demand-side funding for partnering institutions and regional students to purchase training and consulting services from the ACEs that are most relevant.

Sub-component 2.1: Support to Emerging Centres of Excellence for networking, regional technical assistance and improving learning environment

38. Sub-component 2.1 will support five Emerging Centres of Excellence to develop regional institutional partnerships with ACEs (under Component 1) and other relevant international partners to strengthen the capacity of their higher education institutions. These Emerging Centres of Excellence will be in the form of a department/school or a multidisciplinary centre within an institution. Participating countries eligible for support under this sub-component are those that have not yet received support to establish ACE I centres, notably Djibouti (transport-logistics, supply chain management and ICT), Gambia (engineering), Guinea (mining), and Niger (mining, science education).

39. The institutions being supported under this component will receive funding to strengthen, through partnerships, both undergraduate and postgraduate (focus is more on master’s level than PhD) education programmes that will provide training to their students and develop in them the skills which will be useful in addressing national development needs of the countries hosting the centres. Emerging centers to be established under this sub-component will receive support for activities including: regional technical assistance (TA) to strengthen academic programmes and curriculum design; faculty scholarships and training; costs of visiting faculty; TA for institutional policies and practices; improving teaching and research resources; and other regional engagements. The funding to these centers will also be based on DLIs (within similar broad seven DLI categories as is the case for the Component 1 ACEs).

40. Although the Emerging Centres of Excellence were not selected competitively, these institutions, in conjunction with national higher education authorities, were required to submit strong proposals with specific strategic targets in order to receive financial support under this sub-component as Emerging centers. They were provided technical support to write quality and strong proposals. To strengthen the academic support base of these five centres they will each be mapped to the regional network of an ACE Impact center supported under Component 1, that is focusing on a similar thematic area.

Performance and Funding Contract and related financing parameters
41. Each center’s available funds will be distributed across the relevant DLIs/DLRs. These centers will be expected to meet the same seven DLIs as ACE Impact centers, with a large share of the DLIs to incentivize results for improved undergraduate and master’s programs. Up to a capped amount will be disbursed against specific EEPs (salaries, scholarships and operating costs) in the annual budget of each center and its host institution, conditioned on the achievement of the specified DLIs. Each institution will sign a PFA with its government. These agreements will include requirements stipulating that: (i) At least 30 percent of funding for each center under this sub-component will be invested in regional partnerships (with new or renewal ACEs that have been selected to receive support under Component 1) and international institutional partnerships (with other institutions outside the ACEs and the region - especially for sectors for which no ACE Impact center exists). Funds can be used to cover regional TA to strengthen academic programs, curriculum design, institutional policies and practices; faculty scholarships and training; and costs of visiting faculty; and (ii) the remaining 70 percent of the funding will support investment in teaching, learning and research equipment and other hardware necessary for regional partnerships and supporting institutional transformation; (iii) Centers may allocate up to 25 percent of funding for civil works; (iv) the project cannot finance monetary incentives of faculty, administrative personnel or public employees; (v) Up to 10 percent of the amount of funding will go towards the ACE host institution’s activities which will be included in the implementation plan and annual workplans of the ACE; and (vi) purchases of vehicles must be explicitly included in the approved annual workplan in order to be eligible and must not exceed one bus and one car per ACE Impact centre. The funding and performance agreement will also include the government’s indicative planned funding of institutional staff during the project.

Sub-component 2.2: Support for PhD scholarships through the PASET Regional Scholarship & Innovation Fund

42. Sub-component 2.2 will finance regional scholarships through the World Bank-financed Partnership for Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology - Regional Scholarship and Innovation Fund (PASET-RSIF) to support primarily the training of the next generation of faculty for higher education institutions in the region. The Fund aims to create, through PhD training, a critical mass of highly skilled African scientists and innovators in Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology (ASET) fields in priority economic sectors. This Sub-component 2.2 will build institutional capacity, to support improvements in the quality and quantity of academic staff in the region’s higher education institutions, ultimately increasing academic capacity of these institutions. Five countries (Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Senegal) have taken the lead in committing US$2 million each to a general Fund established by African governments in 2015. Several sub-Saharan African countries have expressed strong interest in contributing to the PASET-RSIF. Through ACE Impact, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Senegal, Nigeria and Benin plan to contribute to the PASET-RSIF.

43. General Scholarship Management of the RSIF is the responsibility of the implementing entity of the Fund (the International Center of Insect Physiology and Ecology- icipe). This arrangement will include preparing scholarship application documents and managing the scholarship application process; developing and regularly update the RSIF operational manual; leading the selection process for host universities; preparing monthly progress reports and financial statements; and preparing, facilitating signing, and monitoring of the progress of agreements and MoUs with selected host and partner universities.

c) Component 3: Enhancing National and Regional Level Project Facilitation and Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E)

Sub-component 3.1: Support for Project Facilitation and M&E at the Regional Level

44. This component will focus on overall regional coordination and facilitation at the regional and national levels, including ensuring coordination between the ACEs, peer-learning, and ensuring measurement of, and reporting of, aggregated results. This component will also focus on supporting the participating governments’ higher education institutions to increase talent mobility, foster thematic networking and partnerships both among the ACEs, and between them and other relevant professional bodies.

45. This sub-component will be financed through a Regional IDA Grant to the Association of African Universities (AAU) as the Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) of the ACE Impact Projects. The AAU will support: M&E activities such as development of an online M&E database platform, verification of results, benchmarking of ACE host universities, and graduate tracer studies; site supervision visits of ACEs by independent experts; communications, safeguards support, capacity-building; and knowledge-sharing and networking among ACEs and governments. The RFU will also liaise with ongoing regional and national initiatives in order to strengthen the ACE regional networks, including through digital networking platforms. The AAU will further provide technical assistance to regional bodies, including ECOWAS and UEMOA, to support regional policy making on regional higher education science and technology agenda, as well as activities required for regional project facilitation and steering.

46. This sub-component aims to provide timely, sufficient, precise and reliable information for the measuring and reporting of aggregated results to improve and assess the performance of the selected institutions and the ACE Impact centres. The project activities will be:
• Capacity Building activities for the ACEs. This could include training and capacity building within: education and project management, fiduciary training, and specific topics as per needs identified by ACE, for example grant proposal preparation, project sustainability, university board functioning, etc.
• M&E: (i) Enhancing the M&E structures of ACEs and the RFU to facilitate regular and timely reporting on progress of ACE Impact activities; (ii) Workshops and Trainings for ACEs’ relevant staff to jointly develop and report on their results framework; (iii) third party evaluation and technical evaluations for the DLI and results reporting; (iv) other M&E activities including international evaluation groups, and baseline studies, graduate tracer studies, assessments and surveys as per need.
• Support regional policy making through working with ECOWAS, and potentially other regional bodies, to prepare policy studies on regional student and labor mobility and other relevant higher education issues; and to build capacity for regional policy making within higher education, including training of staff.
• The Facilitation activities that include organizing ACE Impact Bootcamp, biannual workshops and PSC Meetings to be held at various locations within the 11 participatiing countries, and supporting the national review committee meetings, including activities related to project management, staff, operating costs, per diem, communication, supervision and implementation visits to individual ACEs. The Facilitation activities also include organizing regular supervision/implementation review, workshops to discuss project implementation progress, lessons learnt and future ACE Impact activities.

Sub-component 3.2: National-level project facilitation

47. Under Sub-component 3.2 activities in Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana and Nigeria will be coordinated by the national agencies responsible for tertiary education. The total allocation, including contingencies, will be US$5.5 million. This sub-component will finance project implementation support at the national level in the countries where the ACE Impact investments exceed US$20 million. These are the National Universities Commission (NUC) of Nigeria, National Council for Tertiary Education (NCTE) of Ghana, the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research in Cote d’Ivoire, and the Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation (MESRSI) of Burkina Faso.

The NUC will setup a Project Implementation Unit (PIU-NUC) which will be responsible for the day-to-day operations in facilitating the ACE Impact project in Nigeria. The PIU-NUC will submit monthly reports to the Executive Secretary of NUC (as part of his overall oversight functions) and additional briefing during the bi-annual National Project Performance and Review meetings. The PIU-NUC will consist of a National Project Coordinator, Procurement Specialists, Financial Specialists, M&E Specialists, Internal Auditor, Communication Officers, Safeguards Specialists and other supporting staff. The PIU operational activities will be managed on a day-to-day basis by the PIU team. The PIU should be competitively selected or appointed based on merit/track record and following World Bank procurement procedures. Once in place, the key members of the team can only be replaced through a request for approval by the NUC. The request must be accompanied by a substantial justification for the replacement. The replacement must equally follow a merit based selection process. The processes outline above will follow Bank regulations including no objections for the various stages for competitive selection as well as no objections for appointment for seconded positions.

48. The PIU-NUC will be managing all other World Bank higher education projects. This will include the Sustainable Procurement, Environmental and Social Standards Enhancement Project (SPESSE) national higher education project. Given the synergies across the SPESSE and ACE Impact projects, the Head of the PIU-NUC will be responsible for both projects with dedicated project officers or deputies for each project, as necessary. This is to ensure there is strong coordination and leveraging of the two projects. Additionally, as necessary, and with a no objection from the World Bank, the PIU-NUC staff can work across both projects with clear terms of reference and staff costs can be shared across the two projects, as necessary.

49. The MESRSI of Burkina Faso currently hosts the Project Implementation Unit (PIU) of its IDA-Funded national higher education project. This same MESRSI-PIU will play the national facilitator role for ACEs in Burkina Faso.

50. The national facilitation units will provide national level support to the ACE Impact centres, within their respective countries. Performance of these national level facilitation agencies will be measured by the degree to which the ACE Impact centres in the respective countries achieve the project objectives including compliance with fiduciary, safeguard and anti-corruption guidelines. The activities will include supervision and training related to educational, research, implementation, fiduciary and safeguards aspects; as well as national M&E and minor TA.
Table 3a: Selected First ACE Impact Centres (Renewals, New and Emerging) by Country, Field and Development Challenge

Sub-Component 1.1: EXISTING AFRICA CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (Renewal centers) 1. ACE: Training and Research in Water Science and Technology, Energy and the Environment in West and Central Africa (CEA-2iE) Institut International d'Ingénierie de l'Eau et de l'Environnement (2iE) Burkina Faso Water, Energy and Environment STEM 2. ACE: Regional Water and Environmental Sanitation Center, Kumasi (RWESCK) Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Ghana Water & Environ. Sanitation STEM 3. ACE: West African Center for Cell Biology of Infectious Pathogens and Non-Communicable Diseases (WACCBIP-NCDS) University of Ghana (UG) Ghana Cell Biology of Infectious & Non-Communi. Diseases Health 4. ACE: West African Center for Crop Improvement (WACCI) University of Ghana (UG) Ghana Crop Improvement Agric 5 ACE: Mathematics, Computer Science and ICT (MITIC) University of Gaston Berger (UGB) Senegal Digital Development STEM 6 ACE: Maternal and Infant Health (SAMEF) Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) Senegal Maternal & infant health Health Sub-Component 1.2: NEW AFRICA CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (New centers) 7 ACE: Training, Research and Expertise in Drug Sciences (CFOREM) Université de Ouagadougou I (Ouaga I) Burkina Faso Pharmaceutical Science Health 8 ACE: Bio-technological Innovation for the Elimination of Vector- Borne Diseases (CEA-ITECH-MTV) Université Nazi Boni (UNB) Burkina Faso Biotech and Vector Transmitted Diseases Health 9 ACE: Regional Transport Research and Education Center, Kumasi (TRECK) Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Ghana Transport STEM 10 ACE: Regional Center for Energy and Environmental Sustainability (RCEES) University of Energy & Natural Resources (UENR) Ghana Power STEM 11 ACE: West African Center for Water, Irrigation and Sustainable Agriculture (WACWISA) University of Development Studies (UDS) Ghana Water & Irrigation STEM 12 ACE: Coastal Resilience (ACECoR) University of Cape Coast (UCC) Ghana Coastal Resilience STEM 13 ACE: West African Genetic Medicine Centre (WAGMC) University of Ghana (UG) Ghana Genetic Medicine Health 14 ACE: Prevention and Control of Communicable Diseases (CEA-PCMT) Université Gamal Abdel Nasser de Conakry (UGANC) Guinea Communicable Diseases Health 15 ACE: Environment and Health (CEA-AGIR) Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) Senegal Environment & Health STEM 16 ACE: Agriculture for Food and Nutrition Security (CEA-AGRISAN) Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) Senegal Food Security & Nutrition Agric Sub-component 2.1: EMERGING CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (Emerging centers) 1 Emerging Center: Logistics and Transport (CELT) Université de Djibouti (UD) Djibouti Transport – Logistics/ICT STEM 2 Emerging Center: Mines and Societies (CEMS) L’Institut Supérieur des Mines et Géologie de Boké (ISMGB) Guinea Mining STEM Add-on Support to Colleges of Engineering 1 College of Engineering Institut International d'Ingénierie de l'Eau et de l'Environnement (2iE) Burkina Faso Energy, Civil Engineering STEM 2 College of Engineering Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, KNUST Ghana STEM 3 College of Engineering University of Djibouti Djibouti STEM Table 3b: Selected Second ACE Impact II Centres (Renewals, New and Emerging) by Country, Field and Development Challenge Sub-component 1.1: EXISTING AFRICA CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE THAT HAVE BEEN RENEWED (Renewal centers) 1. 1. ACE: Mathematical Sciences, Computer Science and Applications University of Abomey Calavi Benin Applied math & statistics STEM 2. ACE: Mines and Mining Environment (CEA-MEM) l'Institut National Polytechnique Félix Houphouët-Boigny (INP-HB) Cote d’Ivoire Mining STEM 3. ACE: Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Agriculture (CCBAD) Université Félix Houphouët-Boigny Cote d’Ivoire Climate change/ biodiversity Agric. 4. ACE: Statistics and Quantitative Economics (ENSEA) École Nationale Supérieure de Statistique et d'Economie Appliquée d'Abidjan Cote d’Ivoire Stats & quantitative economics Socio/science 5. 9. ACE: Genomics of Infectious Diseases (ACEGID) Redeemer's University Nigeria Genomics of infectious diseases Health 6. 10. ACE: Neglected Tropical Diseases and Forensic Biotechnology (ACENTDFB) Ahmadu Bello University Nigeria Neglected tropical diseases Health 7. 4 ACE: Reproductive Health Innovation (CERHI) University of Benin Nigeria Reproductive Health Health 8. 5 ACE: Dry Land Agriculture (CDA) Bayero University, Kano Nigeria Dryland Agriculture Agric 9. 6. ACE: Food Technology and Research (CEFTER) Benue State University Nigeria Food tech and research Agric 10. 7 ACE: OAU ICT-DRIVEN KNOWLEDGE PARK (OAU-OAK) Obafemi Awolowo University Nigeria Digital Development STEM 11. 8. ACE: Oilfield Chemicals Research (CEFOR) University of Port Harcourt Nigeria Oil and gas STEM 12. 9 ACE: Poultry Science (CERSA) University of Lomé Togo Poultry science Agric Sub-component 1.2: NEW AFRICA CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (New centers) 13. 10 ACE: Water and Sanitation (C2EA) University of Abomey Calavi Benin Water & sanitation STEM 14. ACE: Valorization of Waste Products with High Value Added (VALOPRO) l'Institut National Polytechnique Félix Houphouët-Boigny (INP-HB) Cote d’Ivoire Valorisation of waste STEM 15. 11 ACE: Pastoral Productions – Meat, Milk, Leather and Skins (CERPP) Université Abdou Moumouni Niger Livestock Agric 16. 12 ACE: Public Health and Toxicological Research University of Port Harcourt Nigeria Nursing Health 17. 13 ACE: Centre for Population Health and Policy Bayero University, Kano Nigeria Nursing Health 18. 14 ACE: Covenant Applied Informatics and Communication Covenant University Nigeria Digital Development STEM 19. 15 ACE: Technology Enhanced Learning (ACETEL) National Open University of Nigeria Nigeria Digital Development STEM 20. 16 ACE: Innovative and Transformations Stem Education (CITSE) Lagos State University Nigeria STEM Education Education 21. 17 ACE: Mycotoxin and Food Safety Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria Nigeria Mycotoxin and food safety Health 22. ACE: Drug Research, Herbal Medicine Development and Regulatory Science University of Lagos Nigeria Herbal medicine development and regulation Health 23. ACE: New Pedagogy in Engineering Education (ACENPEE) Ahmadu Belo University Nigeria Engineering education STEM 24. ACE: Sustainable Power and Energy Development (ACE_SPED) University of Nigeria Nsukka Nigeria Power STEM 25. ACE: Future Energies and Electrochemical Systems Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria Nigeria Renewable energy STEM 26. ACE: Power Management (CERME) University of Lomé Togo Power STEM 27. 13 ACE: Sustainable Cities in Africa (DOUNEDON) University of Lomé Togo Urban Design Soc./ Econ Sci. Sub-component 2.1: EMERGING CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (Emerging centers) 1. 11 Emerging Center: Innovative Teaching/Learning of Mathematics and the Sciences for SSA (CE-IEA-MS4SSA Université Abdou Moumouni Niger Math & Science Education Education 2. Emerging Center: Mining Environment EMIG Niger Mining STEM 3. Emerging Center: Science, Technology and Engineering for Entrepreneurship Gambia Technical Training Institute The Gambia Engineering/ Math & Science Education STEM Add-on: College of Engineering (CoEngg) 1. Collège of Engineering: Energy, Transport Infrastructures and Environment (CoE-EIE) University of Abomey Calavi Benin Engineering STEM Note: The Côte d’Ivoire Renewal and New centers to be funded solely by AFD under a separate project are:

a. ACE: Mining and Mining Environment (CEA-MEM) at the National Polytechnic Institute, - Houphouët-Boigny Côte d’Ivoire, (INP-HB)
b. ACE: Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Agriculture (CCBAD) at the Félix Houphouët-Boigny University (UFHB)
c. ACE: Statistics and Quantitative Economics at the National School of Statistics and Applied Economics (ENSEA)
d. New Center: ACE: Valorization of Waste Products with High Value Added (VALOPRO) at the INP-HB.
4. INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE OPERATION OF THE ACE IMPACT PROJECT
a) Key Roles and Responsibilities at the National Level
51. The implementation of the ACE Impact Project at the national level rests essentially with the selected institutional centres of excellence. In this respect, each selected institution will implement its own Africa Centres of Excellence for Development Impact proposal. Further, administrative capacity, most often from the institutions’ central administration will assist with the fiduciary tasks. An ACE Impact team will be established, led by a Centre Leader (or Centre Director) who is a recognized educator/researcher within the primary discipline of the ACE Impact and supported by faculty from the relevant engaged departments. The Centre Leader is the key person responsible for project implementation at the university level. The Centre Leader is also firmly expected to be the budget responsible at the ACE Impact level. The Centre Leader has been assessed through an academic and governance assessment undertaken at the initial stages of proposal selection, which was an important element in the selection of the Centre of Excellence. As such, the Centre Leader can only be replaced through a request for approval by the National Agency in charge of higher education and processed through the representative of the government in the project steering committee or the government’s focal point for the project and with information to the World Bank and AAU teams. The request must be accompanied by a substantial justification for replacing the Centre Leader. Lastly the proposed new Centre Leader must be adequately competent academically and managerially for assuming the critical role of being an ACE Impact Centre Leader.

52. Each government will constitute a National Project Performance Review Committee through the ministry or agency responsible for higher education. It is tasked with a semi-annual review of performance and implementation support, including implementation planning (but with no day-to-day implementation or approvals). This committee will include members from Ministry of Finance, as well as relevant line ministries based on the focus area of the ACEs (e.g agriculture, environment, health, oil and gas, etc.). In particular, relevant government agencies such as the Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Higher Education, Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Youth and Sports, and Ministry of Health, as well as national agencies responsible for higher education, will be represented in the National Project Performance and Review Committee, which will be headed by a national PSC Member or focal point appointed by the government of each participating country. Annex 1.a provides the Terms of Reference for the ACE Impact Project National Steering Committee.

53. Fiduciary project implementation support and supervision at the national level will lie with an existing implementation unit responsible for the implementation of a related World Bank project in education, health, agriculture or the extractive industries. This avoids setting-up a new implementation unit, builds upon existing fiduciary capacity, and increases integration of the project within the Bank's existing portfolio. Further, the regional facilitation unit (AAU) will fund training within fiduciary and safeguard issues as per needs.

b) Key Roles and Responsibilities at the Regional Level
1. Regional ACE Impact Project Steering Committee
54. The ACE Impact Project Steering Committee will provide overall guidance and oversight for the project. During project preparation the ACE Impact Project Ministerial Steering Committee will make the final recommendation and selection of the ACEs following a technical evaluation by the Independent Evaluation Committee. During project implementation its main task will be to provide oversight and guidance on the project and direct ACEs to ensure the achievement of the project objectives. The Project Steering Committee includes representatives from each of the participating countries, recognized African and international academicians, sector representatives, and acknowledged civil society/private sector stakeholders. Annex 1b presents the Terms of Reference for the ACE Impact Project Steering Committee.

2. Regional Facilitation Unit
55. A Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) hosted by the Association of African Universities (AAU) will be responsible for sub-component 3.1. The AAU will be responsible for implementing sub-component 3.1 of the project, which entails supporting the aggregation of the M&E reports for the ACEs as well as capacity building on project management for the ACEs and capacity building within higher education. This includes managing the evaluation proposal, support to develop baselines, and as required consultancies for independent verification of results achieved. The RFU will provide these services to the new centres, renewal centres, emerging centres, and colleges/schools of engineering. The RFU will employ existing staff and resources in AAU and add specific required staffing, including an ACE Impact project manager that will be responsible for day-to-day project implementation. Annex 2 provides the Terms of Reference for the RFU.

56. ECOWAS would provide the overall political backing and advice on promoting the regional specialization of the project. The project would also support policy studies and capacity building within ECOWAS to review policies for regional mobility of skilled labor and policy coordination within higher education.

3. Regional Coordination and Facilitation
57. The ACE Impact Project will be implemented by the selected ACEs, with project facilitation and coordination support from the Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) and technical assistance from selected consultants as necessary. The individual ACE is responsible for strategic planning and implementation of their institutional proposals, monitoring, evaluation and reporting. The ACEs will also be responsible for all fiduciary aspects required under World Bank guidelines for financial management, procurement and, environment and social safeguards. The Regional Facilitation Unit is a regional body with at least 4 professional staff established in the secretariat that deal with Project coordination and facilitation, support to ACEs for monitoring and evaluation and various technical assistance as necessary. The project will operate under the overall guidance and oversight of a Project Steering Committee (PSC) whose main task is to set implementation guidelines, review results and progress, oversee the RFU and assist ACEs to ensure the achievement of the project objectives.

58. Project implementation support and supervision at the national level would be undertaken by the National Project Performance and Review Committee. The fiduciary capacity available within higher education or related project would provide implementation support and possibly oversight for the ACE Impact Project. Further, the ACE Impact project would to the extent feasible, use the same fiduciary procedures as in the closely related project.

4. The Goal of the RFU
59. Given the regional nature of the project, the project requires the RFU to coordinate and facilitate regional activities to the ACEs, partner institutions and be responsible for implementing regional activities for all countries participating in the project. The RFU will not implement or compete with the ACEs in implementation of the project, rather it will work in close collaboration with the ACEs to ensure smooth operation of the project and will support the implementation of project through:
i. facilitating the selection of the ACEs and other project preparation activities.
ii. ensuring effective and efficient coordination and facilitation of regional project activities.
iii. supporting the monitoring and evaluation needs of the selected ACEs as well as aggregated M&E needs of the overall project.
iv. supporting the Project Steering Committee in delivering its tasks.
v. providing capacity building support and facilitating provision of technical support and thematic networking and partnerships on demand by the ACEs.

5. The Role of the RFU
60. Specifically the role of the RFU will be to support the ACE project through:
1. Preparation Phase: The RFU will
(i) Coordinate and facilitate the selection and evaluation process of the ACEs
(ii) Support preparation of MoUs for ACEs with partner institutions
(iii) Undertake baseline study for project results framework
(iv) Support the set-up of the project steering committee

61. Implement sub-component 3.1 of the project, that is regional project coordination, monitoring and evaluation and provision of technical support and thematic networking and partnerships to ACE Impact countries. Tasks include:
(i) Support the capacity building, knowledge sharing and coordination between the ACEs and partner institutions through joint lessons learning and capacity building events.
(ii) Serve as the facilitation secretariat between the different project stakeholders including supporting the coordination between the ACEs with concerned Ministries/ Departments of national Governments, the AFD and the World Bank.
(iii) Facilitate networking and partnerships among the ACEs in requested thematic areas.
(iv) Oversee the implementation of cross-cutting intervention tasks such as policy studies for regional mobility and other relevant tertiary education issues.
(v) Organize two annual supervision missions.
(vi) Organize periodic meetings between ACEs and relevant stakeholders.
(vii) Produce ACE Impact Project Updates to stakeholders.
(viii) Coordinate and fund the activities of the PSC, including facilitating the bi-annual PSC meetings.
(ix) Support the provision of technical assistance to ACEs in thematic and other tertiary education areas as requested.

62. Provide Monitoring and Evaluation support to the ACEs including:
(i) Overall data collection for monitoring and evaluation.
(ii) Support in M&E activities including report updating.
(iii) Aggregating reports from all the ACEs into one.
(iv) Guide the operations of Monitoring and Evaluation Specialists in ACEs and Partner institutions through providing advice and operating as a support role for issues (problems and solutions) raised by ACEs and partner institutions.
(v) Support the development of procedures for regular monitoring of performance of Project Institutions.
(vi) Conduct/ commission impact evaluation of training programmes and various types of other studies and disseminate the findings.
(vii) Publish on its website results of all national level selections, findings from monitoring and evaluation studies and such other information as required under the Disclosure Management Framework.

6. The Role of the ACEs
63. As has been stated previously, the ACE Impact project consists of three components. Component 1 will aim to strengthen the capacity of selected institutions to establish Africa Centres of Excellence (ACE) and scale-up well-performing ACE I centres. Component 2 will support to Emerging centers of excellence for networking, regional technical assistance and improving learning environment, as well as support PhD scholarships through the PASET Regional Scholarship & Innovation Fund. These ACEs will deliver regional, demanded, quality training and applied research in partnerships with regional and international academic institutions and in partnership with industry. Component 3 consists of regional activities for the ACEs and their governments to build capacity, support project implementation, monitor and evaluate, and develop regional policies. Further, Component 3 will provide support for national level coordination (Nigeria, Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire and Burkina Faso) by the government-designated national higher education agencies.

64. Funding and performance contract between the government and the University: This agreement will be signed on behalf of the government by the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry/Agency in charge of Higher Education and on the university side by the Head of Institution (Rector/Vice-Chancellor/President) and the ACE Impact Centre Leader. A template of this agreement will be provided for each country to consider and customize if found appropriate. This Funding and Performance contract has the following elements:
• Upon project effectiveness – after signing of the above two agreements and any needed national approval.
• The ACE will submit information to the National Performance and Review Committee regarding the achievement of the preparation and qualification results (DLI1 – Year 0). Further, the ACE will certify that it has the required background information in its archives to document the achievements of the results.
• The Government through the National Performance and Review Committee will review and submit information to the World Bank with copy to the RFU (AAU) regarding the achievement of the preparation and qualification results (DLI 1 – Year 0). This information will be supplemented with expenditures in the Eligible Expenditure Programme (primarily salaries). This first disbursement is planned to amount to 10% of the agreed ACE Impact support.
• The World Bank, and/or AFD, will disburse funds for Year 0 results (to a project account in MoF).
• Ministry of Finance will transfer the funds using the regular budget process to the ACE account at the university level.
• If additional funds are necessary for implementation, the government can request an advance from the second disbursement of up to an additional 10% of the support to each ACE. This will be an advance, and if results and eligible expenditures are not subsequently submitted to the World Bank, this advance will have to be refunded to the World Bank and/or AFD.

65. For each subsequent yearly disbursement (2019 – 2023)
a) The ACE will compile the achieved results and certify that it has the required background information in its archives to document the achievements of the results.
b) The ACE, ACE Impact country PSC Member/focal point and the relevant Ministry of the Government through the National Performance and Review Committee will review the results and submit information regarding the achievement of the project results for that year (Year 1-4). The information to submit consists of two parts: (i) ACE results in the form of the DLIs, and (ii) Expenditures in the eligible expenditure program (EEP).
c) The Regional Facilitation Unit (AAU) will together with the World Bank verify achievements, sometimes on a sample basis, and The World Bank and/or AFD will disburse the agreed funds for that year’s results to the project account in MoF.
d) Ministry of Finance will transfer the funds using the regular budget process to the ACE account at the university level.

7. Overall Communication Structure for the ACE Impact Project
66. Given the regional nature of the project and the many stakeholders involved, the section below describes the proposed lines of communication for the ACE Impact project. Given the evolving nature of task teams, team members and positions may change during the lifetime of the project.

67. The ACE Impact project involves:
• 11 countries, each with the ACE Centre Leader, Focal Point and Steering Committee member.
• Regional Facilitation Unit based at the Association of African Universities.
• World Bank Task Team Leader (TTL) and Co Task Team Leaders (Co-TTLs) who are based in Washington DC and country offices.
• AFD Task Team Leader (TTL) and Co Task Team Leaders (Co-TTLs) who are based in Paris and country offices
• Financial Management Specialist and Procurement Specialist.

68. As such the project communications channels include the following:
1. For all no-objections on the project, requests should be sent to the Co-TTL based in the country office with copy to the Regional TTL of the World Bank and AFD (in their focus countries).
2. For all communication to the Centre Leaders, the co-TTL, Regional TTL and focal point should be copied.
3. For all communication to Financial Management or Procurement Specialist, the copy should be made to the co-TTL and focal point.
4. For all regional no-objections from the RFU they should be sent directly to Regional TTL.
5. For all sector specific questions on improvement and work related to the sector, they should be sent to subject matter specialists responsible for those sectors with copy to the Regional TTL, Co-TTLs and AAU.

Table 4.a: ACE Impact AFD team contacts

Country Bénin Côte d’Ivoire Nigéria Regional Focal Point Responsible Jeanne Vanuxem Milleliri vanuxem-millelirij@afd.fr Romeo Ayena ayenar@afd.fr Celine Gratadour gratadourc@afd.fr Victor Baysang baysangmichelinv@afd.fr Quentin Delpech delpechq@afd.fr
Table 4.b: ACE Impact World Bank team contacts and structure

Country Education Financial Management Procurement Safeguards Nigeria Aisha Garba Mohammed agmohammed@worldbank.org Eliot Jolomi Dikoru edikoru@worldbank.org Eucharia Nonye Osakwe eosakwe1@worldbank.org Oyewole Oluyemi Afuye oafuye@worldbank.org Joseph Ese Akpokodje jakpokodje@worldbank.org (Taiwo) Ghana Eunice Yaa Brimfah Ackwerh edapaah@worldbank.org Robert Degraft-Hanson rdegrafthanson@worldbank.org Charles Ashongcashong@worldbank.org Anita Takura atakura@worldbank.org Burkina Faso Boubakar Lompo blompo@worldbank.org Sandrine Egoue Ngasseu segouengasseu@worldbank.org Bourama Diaite bdiaite@worldbank.org Mohamed E. Hendah mhendah@worldbank.org Leandre Yameogo lyameogo@worldbank.org Benin Hyacinthe Gbaye hgbaye@worldbank.org Angelo Donou adonou@worldbank.org Mathias Gogohounga mgogohounga@worldbank.org Joselyn Godonou jgodonou@worldbank.org Senegal Hamoud Abdel Wedoud Kamil hkamil@worldbank.org Fatou Fall Samba fsamba@worldbank.org Mamadou M. Mbaye mmbaye1@worldbank.org Medou Lo mlo1@worldbank.org Togo Mouhamadou Moustapha Lo mlo@worldbank.org Angelo Donou adonou@worldbank.org Kouami H. Messan kmessan@worldbank.org Joselyn Godonou jgodonou@worldbank.org Gambia Alison Marie Grimsland agrimsland@worldbank.org Fatou Mbacke Dieng fdieng1@worldbank.org Haoussia Tchaoussala htchaoussala@worldbank.org Ahmed Fall afall2@worldbank.org Guinea Assane Dieng adieng1@worldbank.org Murielle Babatounde mbabatounde@worldbank.org Alpha Mamoudou Bah abah2@worldbank.org Emeran Serge Evouna emenangevouna@worldbank.org (Mahamadou Maiga) Niger Pamela Mulet pmulet@worldbank.org Jean L Gbaguidi agbaguidi1@worldbank.org Mahamadou B. Sissoko msissoko1@worldbank.org Bougadare Kone bkone@worldbank.org Djibouti Abdo Said Abdo aabdo@worldbank.org Rock Jabbour rjabbour@worldbank.org Franck Bessette fbessette@worldbank.org Melance Ndikumasabo mndikumasabo@worldbank.org Mohamed Adnene Bezzaouia mbezzaouia@worldbank.org Regional Ekua Nuama Bentil ebentil@worldbank.org Himdat Iqbal Bayusuf hbayusuf@worldbank.org Graham Mark Harrison gharrison@worldbank.org Maud Kouadio IV mkouadio@worldbank.org Rim Wazni wrim@worldbank.org Amani Osman aosman2@worldbank.org Robert Degraft-Hanson rdegrafthanson@worldbank.org Charles Ashong (1st ACE Impact) cashong@worldbank.org Oyewole Oluyemi Afuye (2nd ACE Impact) oafuye@worldbank.org Joseph Ese Akpokodje jakpokodje@worldbank.org Olukayode O. Taiwo otaiwo@worldbank.org Fabienne Prost fprost@worldbank.org
5. MONITORING AND EVALUATION ARRANGEMENTS
a) Purpose and Objective
69. This section describes the monitoring and evaluation arrangements for the ACE Impact Project and explains its objective. The roles and responsibilities of the Regional Facilitating Unit (AAU), the ACEs, the ACE Impact Partner Institutions, and other key stakeholders, are also outlined.

70. As a World Bank and AFD funded intervention, the ACE Impact Project emphasizes results-based management which focuses on tracking results and monitoring how these feed into achievement of project goals. Additionally, financing of the project is also linked to performance on agreed indicators. Monitoring and evaluation is therefore critical and will focus on assessing the extent to which implementation at all levels (the AAU, ACEs and their partner institutions) is consistent with agreed timelines and outcomes as set out in the project appraisal document (PAD). The data gathered will serve as a tool both for results-based planning of results, indicators, related activities and budgets, and tracking progress and achievements made under the project. In addition, it will support decisions on project implementation and improvement; demonstrate compliance with agreed procedures and plans; contribute to organizational learning and knowledge sharing through reporting and subsequent discussion and consideration of achievements and challenges; and provide information for stakeholders.
b) Scope of M&E Arrangements
71. In line with the objectives above, the ACE Impact Project monitoring will cover Performance, Compliance; and Impact. Performance monitoring will determine whether activities and processes are being executed as per agreed schedules and help identify implementation challenges and improve project management. Compliance will be assessed based on whether grant conditions and project implementation guidelines including procurement and fiduciary conditions, are being followed. Impact will be measured based on the extent to which the ACE Impact Project is contributing to the achievement of the project development goals.
72. Monitoring and evaluation will be carried out at all three levels of the ACE Impact Project implementation, which cascade one into the other. The levels which will be relevant for planning, managing and measuring the ACE Impact Project´s progress include: (i) The overarching project level which will involve on the one hand compiling and aggregating all data provided by each ACE and, planning, managing and reporting of global ACE Impact results – which is under the responsibility of the Regional Facilitation Unit (AAU); (ii) The project level for each of the separate ACEs – which is under the responsibility of each ACE (which will also report to the AAU), including the data provided to them by their Partner Institutions; (iii) the ACEs´ Partner Institution Level, which is planning, managing and measuring relevant data for the ACE level results frameworks (RFs) – which is under the responsibility of each partner institution, providing the data to their ACE.
c) Preparations for Monitoring and Evaluation Developing the Results Framework
73. To facilitate the M&E process, an overall Results Framework (RF) has been developed by the Bank in collaboration with the AAU and other key stakeholders, and with input from government and university representatives in the region. The RF details results indicators, unit of measure, baselines and cumulative targets for each of the 4 years of the project, the frequency of indicator measurement, data source/methodology, responsibility for the data collection and tracking for each indicator, and guidelines on M&E systems to set up. The RF will serve as the main reference for planning, managing and tracking progress, for assessing the effectiveness of the Project during implementation and measuring final outcomes at project completion. 74. In addition to the three levels mentioned above, there is one more cascading level mainly serving for each ACE to plan, manage and measure Project implementation. Individual ACEs and the Regional Facilitating Unit (AAU) will be expected to develop their own specific results frameworks detailing the expected results, indicators and targets specifically tailored to their needs, based on the details of their individual projects in the project appraisal document.
75. As the Regional Facilitating Unit (RFU), AAU will be responsible for coordinating and supporting the ACEs in implementing and monitoring their projects. Where necessary, local and international experts may be engaged. However, it must be emphasized that per the project documentation, primary responsibility for monitoring and evaluation lies with the ACEs.

Determining Scope of Monitoring and Evaluation
76. Based on the Results Framework, individual ACEs and the RFU are expected to determine what monitoring and evaluation activities will be necessary and assess their institutional capacities for undertaking them. The ACEs are then expected to put in place the necessary tracking systems (both automated and manual) and to designate persons to oversee and implement the M&E function . Where necessary, ACEs may have to arrange additional training for their monitoring and evaluation staff or recruit staff with the requisite expertise. To facilitate the M&E process, ACEs will be expected to draw up in addition to the results frameworks, M&E plans to help plan and manage Monitoring and Evaluation activities over the four years of the project. The M&E Plan should detail what is being monitored (the type of information or data to be collected), how (the data collection methods to be employed), when (the frequency of data collection and reporting), by whom (the persons responsible for monitoring and evaluation, their specific capacities and assigned tasks) and for what reason (how the information gathered will support monitoring and project management).
d) Key Performance Indicators and Targets
77. Based on the objectives of the ACE Impact Project, a number of indicators have been established to keep track of the performance of the Project as a whole. The indicators relate to regionality, training and research quality, research quantity, outreach, and administrative/governance quality.
78. Each indicator is linked to a project development objective (PDO) and related base lines and target values. A baseline value represents the value of the indicator at the outset of, or, prior to implementation of the ACE Project. Target values provide a basis for monitoring, evaluating and reporting performance over time through the collection of trend data. Targets should be reviewed periodically and revised where necessary to ensure they are realistic, given current project conditions. The revised targets should be agreed with subject-matter experts, approved by the World Bank and/or AFD, and communicated to the RFU.
79. The RFU (AAU) will collect, analyze and submit status reports to the World Bank and AFD on the performance of the indicators. Individual ACEs are therefore expected to collect and submit accurate data on the performance of each indicator in the agreed Results Framework to facilitate the RFU’s task. On a regular basis, data submitted will be subjected to a strict verification process by the RFU and independent consultants to confirm their validity.
e) Roles and Responsibilities
80. The roles and responsibilities for the various levels and reporting requirements are outlined in the table below.
Table 5.1 : Roles and Responsibilities

Level Roles & Responsibilities Reporting Requirements ACE Partner Institutions (PIs) • Responsible for M&E • Required to submit reports per schedules agreed with their respective ACEs • Project Leader to assign particular staff to track and collect specific data • PIs collect and submit data to the ACEs/Emerging Centres/ CoEngg per agreed schedules ACEs/ Emerging Centre/ College of Engineering • Project Leader is responsible for overall M&E • Project Leader to assign staff to support tracking and collection of data; supervision and management of the project; liaison with the RFU and other parties; and quality control • Note that Institutional Impact results should be included in the designated Centers’ results • College of Engineering results should be submitted together with their designated Center’s results • ACEs will compile data from their PIs and their centres in the “status as of” column of the RF • ACEs will explain variances between expected and actual performance in the “comments” column. Unexpected outcomes will also be reported in the “comments” column • ACEs will also provide details on each indicator in designated templates. The details would be critical for verifying the results and determining payments for achievement of results • Results would be submitted bi-annually in October and April respectively. RFU (AAU) • Project Manager will have primary responsibility for compiling and reporting M&E reports to the World Bank and AFD • The Project Manager will be supported by the M&E Officer and other RFU Staff designated to track specific indicators • The RFU collects, compiles and analyses data received from the ACEs and forwards this to the World Bank and AFD to inform grant management and disbursement decisions. Table 5.2: Results Framework

Africa Higher Education Centres of Excellence Project ACE Level Results Indicators Core Unit of Measure Specifics Baseline (Nov. 2018’) Annual Target Values Frequency Data Source/Methodology Responsible for Data Collection 2019 Results YR 1 YR 2 YR 3 YR 4 Improve the quality, quantity and development impact of postgraduate education in selected univs. Indicator 1: Number of students (National and Regional) enrolled in specialized Master’s, PhD and short-term professional courses/ programs in the ACEs Number (Indicator Definition: Count of national and non –national students in new ACE Courses) Total number of enrolled students Bi-annually ACE enrolment records with information such as names, contact information, program of study, year in program, nationality, etc. Aggregation of number of students obtained from program/course registrations and submitted to the RFU through the ACE Impact project online data submission portal ACEs and RFU Regional (Total) Regional (Female) National (Total) National (Female) Indicator 1b: Number of Regional students enrolled in specialized programs at ACEs Number (Indicator Definition: Count of regional students in specialised courses) Total Regional students enrolled Bi-annually ACE enrolment records Aggregation of number of students obtained from program/course registrations and submitted to the RFU through the ACE Impact project online data submission portal ACEs and RFU PhD Total PhD Female Masters Total Masters Female Bachelors/ Prof. (Total) Bachelors/ Prof. (Female) Indicator 2:Number of ACE programs and ACE hosting institutions that obtain international accreditation Number (Indicator Definition: Count of relevant programs and institutions) Total Int'l Accreditations Programs Bi-annually ACEs' and their host institutions’ records of certificates and reports issued by the accreditation agencies ACEs and RFU Institutions Indicator 3: Share of ACE hosting institutions with a comprehensive strategic plan for regionalization (→ Outreach) Percentage (Share ofrelevant ACE host institutions) Bi-annually Indicator 4: Number of ACEs that have had substantial development impact Number (Indicator Definition: Count of relevant ACEs) Indicator 5: Number of students and faculty participating in internships/apprenticeships in relevant industry/ institution Number (Indicator Definition: Count of students or faculty with participating in internship in relevant industry or institution INTERMEDIATE RESULTS Establishing New and Scaling up Well-performing Africa Centers of Excellence for Development Impact Indicator 6: Number of revamped or newly designed programs (Master's, PhD and Professional Short Courses) Number (Indicator Definition: Count of revamped/newly designed programs Annually Programme Records Indicator 7: Number of ACEs with female centre leaders Number (Indicator Definition: Count of ACEs with female centre leaders Indicator 8: Number of ACE related research publications in internationally recognized peer reviewed journals Number (Indicator Definition: # of ACE related research publications in internationally recognised peer reviewed journals) Bi-annually International bibliometric databases, as compiled by Elsevier Indicator 9: Number of new nationally or regionally accredited programs Number (Indicator Definition: Count of relevant programs) Total national/ regional programs accreditation National Regional Indicator 10: Amount in externally generated revenue by the ACEs US Dollars (Indicator Definition: Amount of US Dollars generated from outside ACE Bi-annually ACE Financial Statement Indicator 11: Number of faculty and students participating in academic exchanges Number (Indicator Definition: Count of faculty and students on academic exchange) Total number of academic exchanges Bi-annually Record of staff trained Report on relevant training sessions Faculty Students Indicator 12: Number of graduates employed within 6 months of graduation Number (Indicator Definition: Count of students employed within 6 months of graduation) Total number of students employed within 6 months of graduation Bi-annually Analysis of project records on students per semester Regional (Total) Regional (Female) National (Total) National (Female) Indicator 13: Share of well-functioning regional networks led by ACEs Percentage (Indicator Definition: Share of well-functioning networks led by ACEs) Indicator 14: Number of ACE hosting universities participating in the regional benchmarking initiative that submit complete data on at least 85% of the indicators Number (Indicator Definition: Count of ACE host universities under benchmarking initiative that submit data on 85% of DLIs) Enhancing Regional Policymaking, Monitoring, and Facilitation Indicator 15: Level of satisfaction of the ACEs and the Steering Committee on the support given by the RFU Indicator 16: Number of regional higher education policies developed and discussed with participating governments Number (Indicator Definition: Count of Regional higher education policies developed and dicussed with ACE governments) Indicator 17: Number of ACEs and emerging centers reporting to the RFU on at least 85% of the ACE Impact project indicators on time Number (Indicator Definition: Count of Regional higher education policies developed and dicussed with ACE governments)
6. VERIFICATION OF DISBURSEMENT LINKED RESULTS
81. This chapter is an addendum to the preceding chapter on monitoring and evaluation, and clearly outlines the procedures for verifying the individual disbursement linked results (DLRs). Verification is carried out annually and requires the ACEs to submit their results framework that includes progress and achievement of the DLIs for the time-period being verified. The results should be accompanied by supporting data captured in the verification data sheets for the disbursement linked indicators 1 through to 7 (as illustrated in the RFU Monitoring and Evaluation digital system http://ace-impact.AAU.org ). The reports will be reviewed in the first instance by the RFU and comments for fine-tuning, including requests to provide missing data and ensure the details provided correspond with the results reported, will be shared with the ACEs. Once the reports are finalized, the verification process for various DLRs is initiated.

82. Generally, when verification is completed, the RFU will issue verification letters to the World Bank and/or aFD with copies to the centres concerned. The letters will detail the results achieved and the corresponding amounts earned in Special Drawing Rights (SDR) or Euros (EUR).
Based on the letters, the World Bank and/or AFD authorizes disbursement.

i. For World Bank disbursements, the centres make payment requests via the World Bank’s Client Connection platform; and the Bank disburses the funds earned in US Dollars (USD). Each disbursement from the World Bank will reimburse the country for EEPs in the amount determined by the DLRs. Centres are therefore required to submit their EEPs as part of their Interim Financial Reports (IFRs) to the RFU.

ii. For AFD disbursements, the centres make payment requests in accordance with the stipulations of the respective financing agreements of the countries (Nigeria, Benin and Côte d'Ivoire) which specify the modalities for the disbursement of funds.

Verification Schedule
83. The schedule for verification differs for the different categories of results. The RFU would usually prompt centres on the submission of reports for verification and the initiation of verification exercises. For some results, the Centres are responsible for notifying the RFU on achievement and requesting for their verification. Refer to Table 6 below on the verification Protocol for specifics on the individual DLRs.

Results verification during COVID – 19
84. Due to the limitations imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, centers are facing several challenges in the recruitment of students, especially, regional students and delivering in-person classes. Travel restrictions have also affected how verification of civil works and large equipment will be undertaken. Therefore, following endorsement from the PSC, the project verification processes has been expanded to include updates on verification protocols and schedules.

85. To adapt to the COVID-19 context, three principal adjustments have been made: (i) expension of online students; (ii) flexibility on regional students rules and (iii) update on the verification requirements and schedules. The project will review the impact of these adjusments at Mid Term Review, including possible extension to ensure all project objectives are met by end of the project. See Table 6 and Annex 3 for further details on the COVID-19 adjuments.
75.1. Expension on the verification protocol for virtual/online students. With the closing of most universities, holding physical training and classes has been quasi-impossible and most centers used various online channels to continue classes. Given such context, centers can recruit online and virtual PhD, Masters and Short-course students under the project:
i. Online students are students fully attending class virtually and are different from in-person students currently attending class virtually due to COVID-19
ii. Online students are counted at 50 percent of the value of in-person students.
iii. Students who were registered on a regular face to face or blended training that are studying through virtual mechanism due to the COVID-19 pandemic are still counted at the full DLI cost

85.2. Flexibility on the Regionality (Regional students) rules. The COVID-19 pandemic affected the recruitment of regional students in the centers. Considering this context, verification rules on regionality will be waived for calendar year 2020 :
i. Minimum of 20 to 30 percent of students are regional for full disbursements on national students (1 regional for 4 nationals) will not be apply for January to December 2020 enrollments;
ii. Regionality flexibility will be waived up to number of students projected for year 2 per student category in DLI table;
iii. Beyond the year 2 projections, regionality rules will be applied to national students submitted; and
iv. Ceilings fixed per DLR remain the ultimate restricting factor

85.3. Update on the verification requirements and schedules. Centers experienced significant delays in their regular operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, verifications process of various DLRs have been adjusted to adapt to the current context:

i. Students verification schedule: Given that the academic year in some countries have not yet start and will not until January 2021, the project will consider depending on the volume and trends of results submitted by the centers:
• Reducing Student enrollment time eligibility from 6 to 4 months
• Organizing two rounds of student’s verification in 2021
o Regular verification in January 2021
o Review and explore a second round in 2021 depending on trends and need of the centers

ii. Milestones verifications (DLRs 4.3 and 7.5): With the current country travel restrictions, the project will consider:
• As much as possible online and virtual verification
• Explore using country-based experts for onsite verification of civil works/large equipment

Centers also have the opportunity to make adjustments to their planned activities through their annual workplans. Activities eligible as part of the COVID-19 could be classify under the following categories (See annex 5 for list of activities):
• Contracts for research related to COVID-19
• Sales from innovative products developed by the centers to respond to a development challenge. e.g. solar-powered handwashing stations with hand-sanitizer/soap dispensers.

Table 6: DLI Verification Protocol
Disbursement Linked Results (DLR) Actions to be completed /Documents to be submitted Additional Information to have readily available for potential verification DLI 1 Institutional readiness DLR# 1.1: Basic Readiness  Financing Agreement is effective  The RFU has approved of the center’s Implementation Plan and the Procurement and Financial Management Manuals.  Official designation of the core team members (Center leader, Deputy Center leader, FM responsible, procurement responsible, M&E responsible and sectoral liaison).  The Center has designated a non-staff student representative to the RFU. The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$300,000 equivalent to US$450,000 equivalent per milestone. The country specific value is in the Financing Agreement.  ACE implementation plan  ACE annual work plan for the first year  Financial Management and procurement procedures  Details and contacts of core team members DLR# 1.2: Full Readiness  Project Management certification for at least one leading team member;  Functional center website (a link to the center’s website);  Student handbook on the website with policies for sexual harassment and scholarships;  Sectoral Advisory Board (SAB) constituted and its endorsement of the Implementation Plan. The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$300,000 equivalent to US$450,000 equivalent per milestone. The country specific value is in the Financing Agreement.  Project Management certificate  Website address/ link  Minutes of the SAB meeting that endorsed Implementation Plan DLI 2 Development Impact of ACE Center DLR#2: Independent, external evaluation of the development impact of the center • Independent, external evaluation of the development impact of the ACE center conducted during Year 3 (Year 2 for renewals) and end of Year 4 of project implementation. • External evaluators assess and score development impact of the center. • In Year 3, score is based upon progress towards development impact. • In Year 4, score is based upon development impact. The criteria for evaluation will include (i) Relevance and impact of graduates on society, including the share of graduates hired in the target sector and feedback from key employers; (ii) relevance and impact of research on society; (iii) progress on DLIs; (iv) SAB annual reports; and (v) interviews with center graduates and sectoral stakeholders. The value of this DLI varies between countries from US$25,000 equivalent to US$35,000 equivalent per point in the score (point scale 1 to 5). The country specific value is in the Financing Agreement.  Interview transcripts  Evaluation report DLI 3 Quantity of Students with Focus on Gender and Regionalization DLR#3.1: New PhD students DLR#3.2: New Master students DLR#3.3: New Prof. short courses DLR#3.4: New 1st Degree students • Table with the new students in courses under the ACE, over and above those reported previously. Eligible new students in degree programs (PhD, Master and Bachelor) must have completed their first semester. Note that first degree/ bachelor students are eligible only for Emerging Centres and Colleges of Engineering. The number of new students should be reported by level of course (PhD, Master, Short course and Bachelors), by nationality (national, non-national African, and international), and by gender. • For PhD students, a summary list of the enrollment status of the previous-reported students must be provided, along with a certification that the enrolled PhD students are all actively pursuing the degree. The value of this DLR is as follows: PhD Masters Short-course Professional Bachelor/ 1st Degree National Male $10,000 $2,000 $400 $1,000 National Female $12,500 $2,500 $500 $1,500 Regional Male $12,500 $4,000 $800 N/A Regional Female $15,600 $5,000 $1,000 N/A • List of names and contact details (email & telephone) for each reported student. For DLR # 3.1 & 3.2 Regionality rules adjusted for 2020 calendar year (subject to regular reviews) • Virtual students counted at 50% • Regional criteria (30% regional students) waived for Jan – Dec 2020 enrollment • Up to number of students projected per student category in DLI table for year 2 • 20% Regional rules applied back to beyond year 2 projections • Maximum per DLR still holds (ultimate restricing factor) For DLR#3.3, group photographs, training curricula, reports, evaluation survey instrument and report must also be provided • In case of online short course verification (part of Covid-19 Pandemic adjustment). The verification would consider: • Completed DLR 3.1 – 3.4 template (provide details for only short course students) • Participation list from the Meeting App for each day of the training (see in foot notes guidelines on how to obtain this from various meeting applications). Please ensure participants sign in with the official names they registered with to facilitate reconciliation • Curricula for the Professional Short Course o Links to recording of each day’s session • Results of survey administered to participants (should include a copy of the survey instrument) DLI 4 Quality of Education and Research through Regionalization DLR#4.1: No. of internationally (regionally/sub-regionally) accredited education programs  ACE to report all programme accreditations achieved over the period under review with details on programme title; level (PhD, Masters, Bachelor's); type, date and expiry of accreditation; name and contacts of accrediting agency/ institution.  Also, information must be provided on the type of accreditation undertaken (Gap assessment certified /undertaken by an external accreditation agency; Self-evaluation undertaken following satisfactory international standards (agreed as part of the performance agreement); Regional (WAHO/CAMES); Sub-regional or National Accreditation or ISO; Bologna Compliant programs (details to be specified)  Center to show evidence (copy of certificate, accreditation letter and or report, email confirmation) of achievement of the specific accreditation or assessment The value of this DLR is US$500,000 per program internationally accredited; US$100,000 per program nationally/regionally accredited; US$100,000 per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken; US$50,000 for new/revamped courses meeting international standards • Accreditation letter/ certificate and link to same on project website DLR#4.2: No. of internationally recognized centre relevant research publications  Centre submits a list of research publications produced over the period under review including details on references, abstract and ACE affiliated authors.  The list should indicate which of the authors are affiliated to the ACE in question The value of this DLR is US$10,000 per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners; US$15,000 per article co-authored with regional partners.   • Contacts of students undertaking internships • Contacts of companies/sector associations hosting students DLR#4.3: Improved teaching and research environment as per approved proposal (institutional specific annual milestones specified in the performance and funding agreement) • The Implementation plan for each ACE will clearly describe between 3 to 5 annual main milestones for improving its teaching and research environment based upon the specific activities to be undertaken by the centre. Additional documentation required to prove the achievement of each milestone will be detailed. This could for example be: signed contract for rehabilitation, signed contract for delivery of specified lab or learning equipment; halfway or completed rehabilitation; delivered and installed labs, learning equipment or furniture and evidence of equipment usage by students and researchers. • Each ACE will have differing milestones; however, they are a set of common milestones such as: 1. Signing of building, evidence includes (i) signed copy of contract with bill of qualities (ii) certificate that ESMP adhered to (iii) relevant procurement procedures from agreed PM has been followed (iii) description o. In addition, the x percent in milestone 2 is agreed in the initial contract. Building contract has to be on the ACE website 2. X percent completion of building, evidence includes (i) certification of x percent completion of construction by an architect/engineer acceptable to The Bank. The engineer/architect will be independent and hired by AAU to verify the progress (ii) photos to certify completion of construction and uploaded on ACE website 3. Laboratory equipment purchased or supplied contract signed/invoice with certification of procurement, relevant procurement documents are available for post-procurement audits. Equipment contract is shared on ACE website 4. 100 percent completion of building and 100% of equipment installed and in-use by faculty and students. Evidence includes photos and checklist of all equipment contracted with a status and location of purchased equipment. All equipment has to be entered into asset catalogue of the university. The value of this DLR is US$300,000 per milestone • Centre will share link to contracts, evidence of adherence to fiduciary requirements, pictorial evidence of completion of construction, rehabilitation and equipment usage, on their website DLI 5 Relevance of Education and Research DLR#5.1: Amount of externally generated revenue by the ACEs as paid into the designated ACE-Programme account • A designated account must be set up for the ACE Project. The financial statement should be in relation to the designated project account. • The ACE designated account must be audited • Externally generated funds from other donors/development partners is capped at 50% of the maximum to be disbursed • Eligible sources of revenue include tuition fees, other student fees, joint research, research consultancies, fund raising and competitive grants (from governments and development partners) or other external sources The value of this DLR is US$1 for each US$1 generated from national, or international non-firm sources; US$2 for each US$ 1 generated from regional or from private/ sectoral sources; • Evidence of revenue generated (bank transfers etc. of externally raised funds) with details on amount in the original currency, date of receipt, source name, contacts and type (national or international non-firm/ regional or private/ sectoral), details of account in which funds are lodged, DLR#5.2: No. of Students /faculty with at least 1-month internship in relevant industry/ sector-relevant institutions (by country/region). • Tables with students who have undertaken internships of at least 1 month during the period under review • Staff on sabbatical with a relevant stakeholder can count towards the internship DLR • Eligible host institutions include private companies, ministries and public utilities • Placements at research institutes and universities do not count towards the internship DLR. The value of this DLR is US$1,000 per period in country and US$1,500 per period in region  Centre to provide details on student names and type (PhD or masters), contact details, name, contacts and status (public/private) and type (regional/national) of the host-institution, qualifications or credits earned, etc. DLR#5.3: • The Implementation plan for each ACE will clearly describe the main milestones for promoting entrepreneurship, innovation, start-up companies, and/or technology transfer/commercialization support. In the Implementation Plan, the specific activities to be undertaken by the centre should be identified. Additional documentation required to prove the achievement of each milestone will be detailed. This could for example include: 1. Creation of a technology transfer office 2. Rent by 10 new startups in an incubation center 3. Patents earned by Center faculty and students 4. Establishing an entrepreneurship curriculum/certificate/center on campus The value of this DLR is US$100,000 for each milestone  Centre will share links to documentary and pictorial evidence of achievement of the milestones on their website DLI 6 Timeliness and Quality of Fiduciary Reporting DLR#6.1: Timely financial reporting for the ACE account, including timely submissions of Interim Financial Reports (IFRs) and of audit reports for the period • Timely financial reporting and submissions means the requisite financial and procurement reports are submitted by the relevant deadline as indicated by the RFU • The financial reporting consists of the external financial and procurement audits due 6 months after the financial year (calendar year for all the countries participating) and the Interim Financial Report (IFR). The IFR is due every semester on February 15 (for the period July-December of the previous year) and August 15 (for the period January – June of the same year). The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$15,000 equivalent to US$25,000 equivalent per year. DLR#6.2: Functioning internal audit unit and functioning audit committee (under the university’s council) that would support the center and the ACE Impact host university For the first withdrawal application requesting funding for this result: • Guidelines/ ToRs for the audit committee constituted under the governing body of the university • Members of the audit committee • Evidence (report or minutes of meeting) that the Committee has met and discussed the audit for the ACE, the committee’s role in the project, and risks associated with the project. For subsequent withdrawal applications: • Evidence (report or minutes of meeting) that the Committee has met and discussed the external audit for the ACE, any internal audit reports, and following up on issues raised to ensure management’s attention and correction. • If changes to the Guidelines / ToRs have been made, the revised ToRs or Guidelines should be included. Note, the Audit committee should in principle carry out an institutional review of the audits and follow-up. However, the term functioning will be interpreted only regarding review of the ACE part of the university. The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$15,000 equivalent to US$25,000 equivalent per year. DLR#6.3: Web Transparency on Fiduciary reports for the center and the ACE Impact host university A link to the institutional website where the following project reports are publicly available:  All external audit reports for the project, all interim financial reports, the past year’s and the current budget, as well as the current annual work-plan  The trail of webpages (breadcrumb trail) from the institutional home page to the page with the above reports (institutional Home page > Section page > Subsection page > etc.) The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$15,000 equivalent to US$25,000 equivalent per year. DLR#6.4: Quality of procurement planning. Share (%) of the originally approved procurement plan that was executed Timeliness of procurement progress (25% of all procurement contracted by year 1; 55% by year 2, and 100% by year 3, and verification of installation by year 4). Procurement progress report with evidence of contracts signed. The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$15,000 equivalent to US$25,000 equivalent per year. Link to documentary and other evidence of procurement progress on the centre website DLI 7 Institutional Impact • For each ACE Impact Center, DLI 7 is focused on Institutional Impact. • The development and implementation of the workplan for Institutional Impact for each university should be led by the institutional leadership (including, for example the Vice Chancellor or Rector). • For those institutions that host more than one ACE Impact Center, no activities may result in more than one Center earning a DLR under DLR 7 for a single activity. The RFU is responsible for ensuring the coordination necessary in delineating specific activities and DLRs between the different Centers. • In order to achieve DLRs, the institution must develop a plan for approval by the RFU. • Because each institution is different, and has different goals for institutional impact, the specific workplan for achieving this DLI may be different. • Institutions may pursue specific DLRs as described in DLR 7.1 – DLR 7.4. In addition, institutions may identify appropriate activities and milestones for institutional impact under DLR 7.5. For those institutions that host more than one ACE Impact Center,it is anticipate that several milestones for institutional impact will be identified under DLR 7.5. • DLR#7.1: ACE Impact host institution develops and endorses a meaningful university- wide regional strategy (including student affairs). The strategy will include policies and interventions that would ensure that the institution becomes regionally competitive (if not globally), highlighting, for example, how to attract and retain more regional students and partners (both from industry and academia). The value of this DLR is US$100,000 • Copy of Regional Strategy, and link to same on university website  Documentary evidence indicating approval of strategy through appropriate university channels DLR#7.2: ACE Impact host institution undertakes open, merit-based competitive selection of department heads related to the ACEs and university head.  Centre submits evidence that department heads/deans related to the ACEs and university head are recruited through open, merit-based competitive selection The value of this DLR is US$200,000 for university head recruitment and US$50,000 for dean/department heads  Links to online vacancy announcement  Interview reports and scores • DLR#7.3: ACE Impact host institution undertakes institutional wide international accreditation, gap assessments and self-evaluations  ACE to report all institutional accreditations achieved over the period under review with details on type, date and expiry of accreditation; name and contacts of accrediting agency/ institution.  Also, information must be provided on the type of accreditation undertaken (Gap assessment certified /undertaken by an external accreditation agency; Self-evaluation undertaken following satisfactory international standards (agreed as part of the performance agreement); Regional (WAHO/CAMES);  Center to show evidence (copy of certificate, accreditation letter and or report, email confirmation) of achievement of the specific accreditation or assessment The value of this DLR is US$ 200,000 for international accreditation; US$75,000 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation  Accreditation certificates/report, including link to same on university website  Gap Assessment or Self-evaluation reports  Other relevant assessment reports DLR#7.4: ACE Impact host institution participates in the PASET Regional Benchmarking initiative  Host institutions submit complete data on at least more than 85% of the required indicators. Based on results, the host institution submits intervention plan to improve performance.  Centre confirms the participation of the ACE Impact host institution in the benchmarking exercise and its submission of an acceptable intervention plan. The value of this DLR is US$ 50,000 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years). • PASET Benchmarking Report DLR#7.5: Milestones for Institutional Impact as per approved proposal (institutional specific annual milestones specified in the performance and funding agreement)  The Implementation plan for each ACE will clearly describe main milestones for Institutional Impact. Additional documentation required to prove the achievement of each milestone will be detailed. This could for include: Board approval for new policies and procedures; contracts for enhanced MIS systems; documentation on the establishment of new administrative units; launch of a Career Center; launch and achievement of fundraising goal in a capital campaign.  Milestones for Institutional Impact must be approved by the RFU as part of the Implementation Plan.  Minutes of Board meetings  Signed contracts for enhanced systems DLR# 7.6: Milestones for Enhanced Digital Infrastructure and Networking Capacity (Unique to Nigeria) Only Applicable to Nigerian Centers • ACE institutions meets prefomulated and approved milestones in their participation in the NREN services and results show clear evidence that students and faculty are receiving improved access to the services (as formulated by each institution). This could for include; atleast 0.5 gbps broadband connection, (2) acess to electronic library/database content, (3) acess to high performance computing, and (4) acess to high – perfomance computer applications The value of this DLR is US$ 100,000 for year for a single or bundle services • Assessement Reports • University reports
7. PROJECT FINANCING
7.1 Overview of Chapter
86. This chapter describes the financing of the project activities. Financing of the ACEs is designed as a government programme to which the World Bank and/or AFD contributes funding. The ACE Impact project uses government and institutional budgets, agreed rules and emphasizes the strengthening of governmental and institutional oversight for its implementation. The programme consists of funding to the universities’ academic, technical, and administrative staff, other operational costs, and investments into goods, training, services and limited civil works. The World Bank and AFD finances an agreed amount of this programme if the results are achieved and the agreed fiduciary and safeguards rules and standards are followed. The financing contribution of the governments and institutions will be the value of the estimated salaries and operational costs for the implementation of the ACEs. The amount of credit disbursements will be contingent on the satisfactory achievement of agreed, pre-specified programme implementation progress and performance results, referred to as disbursement linked indicators (DLIs). Each DLI has a unit disbursement price per unit of result achieved. The reporting and verification of the achievement of the DLIs and disbursements will be done either semi-annually or annually to be determined based upon country and ACE preferences as well as the transaction costs involved in each disbursement. An advance of around 10 percent of the credit amount will be made to countries with no overdue advances in the World Bank portfolio. The disbursements will reimburse the countries for selected expenditure of the ACE Impact project which are referred to as Eligible Expenditure Programmes (EEPs). The remaining of this chapter details the above project financing summary in the following sections:
a. Financing per country and financing source.
b. The financing modality of the ACEs.
c. Disbursement and financing available to each ACE.
d. The eligible expenditure programme for each ACE.

7.2 Financing per country and financing source
87. IDA allocations will follow the standard practice for regional projects with up to two-thirds of the IDA amount of the project from the regional pool of IDA and one third (1/3) from the national allocation. Table 5.1 presents the project costs by country with the regional and national IDA breakdown.

  Table 7.1: ACE Impact Project Cost and Financing (in US$ million equivalent)
Project Component Total Project Cost Government Funding* IDA Credit IDA Grant AFD Credit ACE Impact I Countries Burkina Faso (3 ACEs + 1 CoE) 59.5 26.5 22 11 - Dijouti (1 Em. ACE + 1 CoE) 28 13 15 - - Ghana (8 ACEs + 1 CoE) 114 54 60 - - Guinea (1 ACE + 1 Em. ACE) 19 9 6.3 3.7 - Senegal (4 ACEs) 28 13 15 - - Total Financing Required 248.5 115.5 118.3 24.7 - ACE Impact II Countries Benin (2 ACEs + 1 CoE) 31.2 14 2 4 11.2 Cote d’Ivoire (4 ACEs) TBC TBC - - 18.7 Gambia (1 Em. ACE) 21.0 9 - 12 0 Niger (1 ACE) 29 14 5 10 0 Nigeria (17 ACEs) 210 95 75 - 40 Togo (3 ACEs) 34 16 12 6 0 AAU (RFU) 5 - - 5 - Total Financing Required 330.2 148 94 37 51.2 Note: *The countries’ contribution to the project cost is the estimated amount required for the salaries of the staff of the ACEs and other university personnel. 7.3 Financing Modality
88. Financing to the ACEs (components 1 and 2) will be results-based, while financing to the AAU, the Nigerian, Burkinabe, Ivorian and Ghanaian facilitation units (Component 3) will be based upon statement of expenditures. The remaining of this section will present the motivation and elements of the financing modality for Components 1 and 2.
89. The motivation for a results-based approach for the ACEs is:
• All focus and implementation efforts go towards generating the agreed results, not just disbursements. In many projects that are financed based upon costs, there is a highly unfortunate tendency to focus on increasing disbursements, because this is easily measurable and comparable across projects, while the true results of the project are not focused upon. A results-based financing explicitly links disbursements to results, and therefore disbursements will not take place without the agreed results.
• Results-based financing increases efficiency and value, because it is no longer possible to invest the funding without producing the results.
• For most participating countries, the funding modality would introduce a new funding tool that enhances accountability for results, increases administrative autonomy of the institution to generate the desired results, and aligns the goals of the institutions with that of the government.
• The funding modality strengthens the country’s own fiduciary programme and procedures. Often efforts are lost in training, applying and monitoring adherences to project (WB) specific fiduciary procedures. These rules are different from those of the regular government and country funding. The new (WB) set of rules can therefore create confusion and, most importantly, the project does not necessarily foster improved fiduciary capacity and monitoring, even though such capacity is critical for institutional development. Using the results-based funding modality, the project will adopt acceptable country fiduciary rules, and work to strengthen capacity and oversight in a sustainable manner.
• A results-based financing modality must provide adequate institutional autonomy to invest the financing as required to achieve the results. Institutions therefore gain autonomy and build administrative capacity to produce the results.

7.4 The Financing modality elements

90. The Africa Centres of Excellence for Development Impact (ACE Impact) is a government programme to which the World Bank and French Development Agency (AFD) contribute funding. The ACE Impact programme uses government and institutional budgets, government-agreed rules and oversight for its implication. The programme consists of funding to the ACE’s teaching, researching, technical, and administrative staff, other operational costs for the ACE, and investments into goods, training, services and limited civil works. The World Bank and AFD finance an agreed amount of this programme if the results are achieved and the agreed fiduciary and safeguards rules are adequately followed. In order to ensure that actual and reasonable expenditures are financed, the World Bank and AFD will primarily or exclusively finance the salary or other non-procurable operational costs of the programme. The government or the institution will commit themselves, and prove during implementation, that it invests the agreed amounts in the ACE Impact programme, notably in the limited civil works, learning equipment, faculty training, etc. as per the agreed ACE Impact implementation plan for each ACE.

91. Using a financing modality exclusively based upon results, the World Bank and AFD would like to emphasise results and the number of projects that achieve their results, while reducing the number of procurement transactions that projects do. Therefore, it is moving towards purely results-based financing. However, the Bank has concerns about the possibility of corruption, leakages, and inefficient use of funds. Further, there has to be a gradual learning process of pricing and monitoring results correctly. Therefore, it plans to finance the ACE Impact project through investment project financing where the disbursements are linked to indicators. As explained below, the primary factor for disbursements is results, but the World Bank and AFD still ensure that they finance actual, necessary, and verifiable costs for the programme. The Bank and AFD will reimburse programme costs that are fiduciary low-transaction costs, such as staff salaries. The investment expenditures for goods, services and limited civil works, which occasionally entail many transactions and substantial fiduciary risks, are assumed by the government and the institution. However, the World Bank and AFD will still facilitate and monitor that (i) the agreed investment amounts are available on a timely basis to the government and the institution and (ii) acceptable government and institutional fiduciary and safeguards guidelines are followed. Further, the World Bank and AFD will support fiduciary capacity building (but it will not take part in the fiduciary transactions except in special cases where it has been agreed that the expenditure for the procurable item will be part of the Eligible Expenditure Programme).

7.5 Disbursements and Financing per ACE
92. The amount of credit disbursements will be contingent on achievement of results as measured by Disbursement Linked Indicators (DLIs). The DLIs are presented in Table 5.2 which is the generic model table in USD for all financed ACEs. This model has been adjusted to each ACE as a function of the amount allocated to each ACE and the applicable exchange rate on the date of negotiation of the Financing Agreement. There are seven DLIs broken down into DLRs. Each DLI is allocated an amount which is the ceiling for disbursement under that DLI. Both the DLIs and the DLRs are varies by country and by types of ACE.

93. Exchange rate. The currency of the IDA credits is SDRs. The above amounts in USD are the equivalent USD amount of the SDR amounts in the Financing Agreement using the exchange at the time of negotiation with each country. Expression of the credits in SDR reduces currency fluctuations and therefore provides more stable financing over the five year period.

94. Exchange rate The currency of the AFD credits is Euros. The above amounts in USD are the equivalent USD amount of the Euro amounts in the AFD Financing Agreement using the exchange at the time of negotiation with each country. Expression of the credits in Euros reduces currency fluctuations and therefore provides more stable financing over the five year period.

  Table 7.1 Generic Model DLI Financing Table
Disbursement Linked Indicator Formula and Unit cost Disbursement Calculation (expressed in USD equivalent) DLI #1 Institutional implementation readiness • DLR# 1.1: Basic Readiness: USD 300,000 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone • DLR# 1.2: Full Readiness: USD 300,000 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone DLI #1: 600,000 (disbursed when all results have been completed) DLI #2 Development Impact of the ACE Centre • DLR# 2.1 Progress to Impact: USD 25,000 per point in the score. Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). • DLR# 2.2 Development Impact: USD 25,000 per point in the score. Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). DLI #2: 200,000 DLI#3 Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization DLRs are scalable per student with at least 30% of regional students. • DLR#3.1: New PhD students in ACE courses. Amounts:  10,000 per national student  12,500 per female student  12,500 per regional student  15,600 per female regional student • DLR#3.2: New Master students in ACE courses. Amounts:  2,000 per national student  2,500 per female student  4,000 per regional student  5,000 per regional female student • DLR#3.3: New short term students in ACE courses. Amounts:  400 per national student  500 per female national student  800 per regional student  1000 per female regional student • DLR#3.4: New Bachelor Students in ACE courses. Amounts:  1,000 per national male student  1,500 per national female student DLI #3: 825,000 DLI#4: Quality of education and research through regionalization • DLR# 4.1: Accreditation Steps: Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step:  US$ 300,000 per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency  US$ 100,000 per program nationally/regionally accredited  US$ 100,000 per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken  US$ 50,000 for new/revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board. • DLR#4.2: Research Publications: Scalable per article. Amounts:  US$ 10,000 per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners  US$ 15,000 per article co-authored with regional partners • DLR#4.3: Improved learning and research infrastructure. Not scalable within each milestone.  US$ 300,000 per milestone DLI #4: 1,700,000 DLI#5 Relevance of education and research • DLR#5.1: Externally generated revenue. Amounts:  S$ 1 for each US$ 1 generated from national non-firm sources or international sources  US$ 2 for each US$ 1 generated from regional or private sources • DLR#5.2: Number of students and faculty with at least 1-month period internship. Amounts:  1,000 per period within the country  1,500 per period within the region • DLR#5.3: Milestone for developing entrepreneurship Not scalable within each milestone.  US$ 100,000 for the milestone. DLI #5: 795,000 DLI#6 Timeliness and quality of fiduciary reporting Scalable within each result. • DLR#6.1: Timely fiduciary reporting and submissions. Amounts:  US$15 000 per year • DLR#6.2: Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management. Amounts:  US$15 000 per year • DLR#6.3: Web transparency of ACE expenses. Amounts:  US$15 000 per year • DLR#6.4: Quality of Procurement. Amounts:  US$15 000 per year DLI #6: 255,000 DLI#7 Institutional impact (by ACE host institution) Not scalable within each result. • DLR#7.1:Meaningful Uniersity Regional Strategy. Amounts:  US$100 000 • DLR#7.2 Open and merit-based selection university heads. Amounts:  US$ 200,000 for selection of the head of institution  US$ 50,000 for selection of a dean • DLR#7.3 Institutional wide accreditation steps. Amounts:  US$ 200,000 for Insttutional international accreditation  US $ 75,000 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation • DLR#7.4 Participation in PASET Benchmarking. Amounts:  US$ 50,000 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • DLR#7.5 Milestones for Institutional Impact. Amounts:  US$ 100,000 per institutional impact milestone • DLR#7.6 Milestones for Participation in the NREM services. Amounts:  US$ 100,000 per year for single or bundle services ( Applicable for Nigeria Only) DLI #7: 625,000 And DLI# 7: 725,000 ( For Nigeria only) Note: Formulas and calculations in the table above are based on a total allocation of USD 5 million. Table 7.2(a) Summary of Burkina Faso Financing DLI Total Financing (EUR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 1,998,000 0 6 0 0 0 0 SDR 333,000 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone. Allocated amount: 1,998,000 1,998,000 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center 698,560 0 0 8 8 16 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). EUR 21,830 per point in the score. Allocated amount: 698,560 0 174,640 174,640 349,280 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 3,636,285 0 11 PhD students 40 Master students 130 Short course professional students 0 first degree students 35 PhD students 110 Master students 200 Short course professional students 0 first degree students 46 PhD students 125 Master students 210 Short course professional students 0 first degree students 52 PhD students 135 Master students 250 Short course professional students 0 first degree students 41 PhD students 130 Master students 250 Short course professional students 0 first degree students Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. • PhD students: - EUR 8,730 per male national student - EUR 11,000 per female national student - EUR 11,000 per male regional student - EUR 13,600 per female regional student • Master Students: - EUR 1,750 per national student - EUR 2,200 per female student - EUR 3,750 per regional student - EUR 4,400 per regional female student • Short-course professional: - EUR 350 per national student - EUR 435 per female student - EUR 700 per regional student - EUR 870 per female regional student • First degree Students: - EUR 870 per national male student - EUR 1,305 per national female student Allocated amount: 3,636,285 0 265,950 711,275 852,100 958,600 848,360 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 9,168,200 0 4 accredi-tation steps 40 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 7 accredi-tation steps 50 published research articles 3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 7 accredi-tation steps 65 published research articles 6 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 4 accredi-tation steps 70 published research articles 3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 0 accredi-tation steps 65 published research articles 4 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure • Accreditation step (not scalable per step): - EUR 262,000 per program intl. accredited - EUR 87,320 per program nat./reg. accredited - EUR 87,320 per gap/self-evaluation - EUR 43,660 for new/revamped courses • Research publication (scalable per article): - EUR 8,730 per article co-authored by ACE - EUR 13,095 per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone): - EUR 262,000 per milestone Allocated amount: 9,16, 200 416,000 1,829,920 2,639,280 2,561,000 1,722,000 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 4,426,255 0 88,000 in revenue 45 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 782,000 in revenue 100 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 1,067,000 in revenue 110 Internships 2 Entre-preneur milestones 968,930 in revenue 160 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 857,885 in revenue 125 internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External revenue: - EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources - EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies • Internships: - EUR 870 per period in country - EUR 1,305 per period in region • Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable): - EUR 87,320 for the milestone Allocated amount: 4,426 255 127,150 869,000 1,337,340 , 126,130 966,635 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 1,270,700 0 4 Timely Fiduciary reporting 5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 5 transparency of ACE expenses 4 quality of procurement planning 5 Timely Fiduciary reporting 5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 5 transparency of ACE expenses 5 quality of procurement planning 5 Timely Fiduciary reporting 5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 5 transparency of ACE expenses 5 quality of procurement planning 5 Timely Fiduciary reporting 5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 5 transparency of ACE expenses 4 quality of procurement planning 5 Timely Fiduciary reporting 5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 5 transparency of ACE expenses 5 quality of procurement planning • Scalable within each result. - EUR 13,100 for timely fiduciary reporting - EUR 13,100 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - EUR 13,100 for transparency of ACE expenses - EUR 13,100 for Quality of procurement planning Allocated amount: 1,270,700 235,800 262,000 262,000 248,900 262,000 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 1,202,000 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 2 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 2 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 3 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 3 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 2 PASET Benchmarking 1 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 3 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 2 Milestones on institutional impact Not scalable. • University-wide regional strategy: - SDR 71,900. • Open, merit-based competitive selection: - SDR 143,800 for the head of institution - SDR 35,950 for a dean • Accreditation step: - SDR 143,800 for international accreditation - SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation • PASET Benchmarking - SDR 35,950 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional impact: - SDR 143,800 per institutional impact milestone Allocated amount: 1,20, 000 0 218,000 159,000 252,000 573,000 Total IDA Financing 19,200,000 1,044,900 3,846,835 5,265,360 5,243,910 3,798,995 Table 7.2(b) Summary of Djibouti Financing DLI Total Financing (SDR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 1,294,240 0 4 0 0 0 0 SDR 323,560 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone. Allocated amount: 1,294,240 1,294,240 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Center 201,320 0 0 0 4 4 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). SDR 25,165 per point in the score. Allocated amount: 201,320 0 0 100,660 100,660 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 1,353,330 0 0 PhD students 10 Master students 0 Short course professional students 0 first degree students 0 PhD students 30 Master students 25 Short course professional students 80 first degree students 5 PhD students 60 Master students 100 Short course professional students 160 first degree students 15 PhD students 70 Master students 100 Short course professional students 160 first degree students 15 PhD students 90 Master students 110 Short course professional students 300 first degree students Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. • PhD students: - SDR 7,190 per male national student - SDR 8,990 per female national student - EUR SDR 8,990 per male regional student - EUR SDR 11,215 per female regional student • Master Students: - SDR 1,440 per national male student - SDR1,800 per national female student - SDR 2,875 per regional male student - SDR 3,595 per regional female student. • Short-course professional: - SDR 290 per national male student - SDR 360 per national female student - SDR 575 per regional male student - SDR 720 per female regional student • First degree students: - SDR 720 per male student - SDR 1,080 per female student Allocated amount: 1,353,330 0 20,000 120,115 292,640 386,110 534,465 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 3,846,715 0 1 accredi-tation steps 5 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 5 accredi-tation steps 10 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 3 accredi-tation steps 15 published research articles 4 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 3 accredi-tation steps 20 published research articles 5 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 0 accredi-tation steps 20 published research articles 1 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure • Accreditation step (not scalable per step): - EUR 215,705 per program intl. accredited - EUR 71,900 per program nat./reg. accredited - EUR 71,900 per gap/self-evaluation - EUR 35,950 for new/revamped courses • Research publication (scalable per article): - EUR 7,190 per article co-authored by ACE - EUR 10,785 per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone): - EUR 215,705 per milestone Allocated amount: 3,846,715 71,900 323,550 1,157,610 1,919,770 373,885 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 1,679,820 0 35,000 in revenue 40 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 185,000 in revenue 90 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 320,000 in revenue 110 Internships 1 Entre-preneur milestones 375,000 in revenue 120 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 325,720 in revenue 150 internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External revenue: - EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources - EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies • Internships: - EUR 720 per period in country - EUR 1,080 per period in region • Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable): - EUR 71,900 for the milestone Allocated amount: 1,679,820 63,800 249,800 471,100 461,400 433,720 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 647,100 0 0 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 0 quality of procurement planning 2 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 2 quality of procurement planning 2 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 2 quality of procurement planning 2 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 2 quality of procurement planning 2 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 2 quality of procurement planning • Scalable within each result. - EUR 15,820 for timely fiduciary reporting - EUR 15,820 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - EUR 15,820 for transparency of ACE expenses - EUR 15,820 for Quality of procurement planning Allocated amount: 647,100 71,900 143,800 143,800 143,800 143,800 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 377,475 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 1 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 1 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 1 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 1 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 1 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 1 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact Not scalable. • University-wide regional strategy: - SDR 71,900. • Open, merit-based competitive selection: - SDR 143,800 for the head of institution - SDR 35,950 for a dean • Accreditation step: - SDR 143,800 for international accreditation - SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation • PASET Benchmarking - SDR 35,950 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional impact: - SDR 143,800 per institutional impact milestone Allocated amount: 377,475 0 107,850 53,925 71,900 143,800 Total IDA Financing 9,400,000 1,521,840 945,115 2,219,735 3,083,640 1,629,670 Table 7.2(c) Summary of Ghana Financing DLI Total Financing (SDR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 3,662,960 0 12 0 0 0 0 SDR 305,580 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone. Allocated amount: 3,662,960 3,662,960 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center 1,380,480 0 0 12 20 32 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). SDR 21,570 per point in the score. Allocated amount: 1,380,480 0 258,840 431,400 690,240 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 6,576,705 0 21 PhD students 50 Master students 280 Short course professional students 94 PhD students 225 Master students 480 Short course professional students 114 PhD students 180 Master students 530 Short course professional students 127 PhD students 225 Master students 530 Short course professional students 116 PhD students 195 Master students 530 Short course professional students Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. • PhD students: - SDR 7,190 per male national student - SDR 8,990 per female national student - SDR 8,990 per male regional student - SDR 11,215 per female regional student • Master Students: - SDR 1,440 per national male student - SDR1,800 per national female student - SDR 2,875 per regional male student - SDR 3,595 per regional female student • Short-course professional & first-degree students: - SDR 290 per national male student - SDR 360 per national female student - SDR 575 per regional male student - SDR 720 per female regional student Allocated amount: 6,576,705 0 389,700 1,325,140 1,589,125 1,708,600 1,564,140 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 10,722,050 0 1 accredi-tation steps 34 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 15 accredi-tation steps 89 published research articles 1 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 5 accredi-tation steps 110 published research articles 8 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 6 accredi-tation steps 135 published research articles 10 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 0 accredi-tation steps 95 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure • Accreditation step (not scalable per step): - SDR 215,705 per program intl. accredited - SDR 71,900 per program nat./reg. accredited - SDR 71,900 per gap/self-evaluation - SDR 35,950 for new/revamped courses • Research publication (scalable per article): - SDR 7,190 per article co-authored by ACE - SDR 10,785 per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone): - EUR 215,705 per milestone Allocated amount: 10,722,050 331,500 1,920,605 3,034,140 4,616,030 819,775 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 10,790,405 0 212,000 in revenue 100 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 1,570,000 in revenue 290 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 2,350,000 in revenue 335 Internships 8 Entre-preneur milestones 2,782,800 in revenue 435 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 2,184,405 in revenue 370 internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External revenue: - EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources - EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies • Internships: - EUR 720 per period in country - EUR 1,080 per period in region • Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable): - EUR 71,900 for the milestone Allocated amount: 10,790,405 284,000 1,778,800 3,180,800 3,096,000 2,450,805 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 2,847,600 0 9 Timely Fiduciary reporting 9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 9 transparency of ACE expenses 9 quality of procurement planning 9 Timely Fiduciary reporting 9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 9 transparency of ACE expenses 9 quality of procurement planning 9 Timely Fiduciary reporting 9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 9 transparency of ACE expenses 9 quality of procurement planning 9 Timely Fiduciary reporting 9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 9 transparency of ACE expenses 9 quality of procurement planning 9 Timely Fiduciary reporting 9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 9 transparency of ACE expenses 9 quality of procurement planning • Scalable within each result. - EUR 15,820 for timely fiduciary reporting - EUR 15,820 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - EUR 15,820 for transparency of ACE expenses - EUR 15,820 for Quality of procurement planning Allocated amount: 2,847,600 569,520 569,520 569,520 569,520 569,520 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 3,019,800 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 5 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 5 Institutional accreditation steps 5 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 4 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 5 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 5 Institutional accreditation steps 5 PASET Benchmarking 3 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 4 Milestones on institutional impact Not scalable. • University-wide regional strategy: - SDR 71,900. • Open, merit-based competitive selection: - SDR 143,800 for the head of institution - SDR 35,950 for a dean • Accreditation step: - SDR 143,800 for international accreditation - SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation • PASET Benchmarking - SDR 35,950 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional impact: SDR 143,800 per institutional impact milestone Allocated amount: 3,019,800 0 539,250 575,200 1,294,200 611,150 Total IDA Financing 39,000,000 5,237,680 6,392,155 9,380,185 11,974,590 6,015,390 Table 7.2(d) Summary of Guinea Financing DLI Total Financing (SDR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 862,820 0 4 0 0 0 0 SDR 215,705 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone. Allocated amount: 862,820 862,820 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center 287,600 0 0 4 4 8 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). SDR 17,975 per point in the score. Allocated amount: 287,600 0 71,900 71,900 143,800 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 1,217,030 0 2 PhD students 20 Master students 10 Short course professional students 40 first degree students 5 PhD students 50 Master students 65 Short course professional students 40 first degree students 15 PhD students 70 Master students 65 Short course professional students 40 first degree students 15 PhD students 70 Master students 110 Short course professional students 50 first degree students 15 PhD students 70 Master students 110 Short course professional students 50 first degree students Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. • PhD students: - SDR 7,190 per male national student - SDR 8,990 per female national student - SDR 8,990 per male regional student - SDR 11,215 per female regional student • Master Students: - SDR 1,440 per national male student - SDR1,800 per national female student - SDR 2,875 per regional male student - SDR 3,595 per regional female student • Short-course professional & first-degree students: - SDR 290 per national male student - SDR 360 per national female student - SDR 575 per regional male student SDR 720 per female regional student Allocated amount: 1,217,030 0 73,340 213,190 299,450 310,500 320,550 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 2,279,335 0 0 accredi-tation steps 8 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 6 accredi-tation steps 8 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 0 accredi-tation steps 14 published research articles 4 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 1 accredi-tation steps 14 published research articles 2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 0 accredi-tation steps 15 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure • Accreditation step (not scalable per step): - SDR 215,705 per program intl. accredited - SDR 71,900 per program nat./reg. accredited - SDR 71,900 per gap/self-evaluation - SDR 35,950 for new/revamped courses • Research publication (scalable per article): - SDR 7,190 per article co-authored by ACE - SDR 10,785 per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone): - EUR 215,705 per milestone Allocated amount: 2,279,335 64,710 352,315 977,890 762,190 122,230 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 1,004,795 0 38,000 in revenue 20 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 175,840 in revenue 70 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 188,000 in revenue 75 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 188,000 in revenue 75 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 184,555 in revenue 80 internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External revenue: - EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources - EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies • Internships: - EUR 720 per period in country - EUR 1,080 per period in region • Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable): EUR 71,900 for the milestone Allocated amount: 1,004,795 52,400 226,240 242,000 242,000 242,155 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 345,120 0 0 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 0 quality of procurement planning 2 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 2 quality of procurement planning 2 Timely Fiduciary reporting 0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 2 quality of procurement planning 2 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 2 quality of procurement planning 2 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 0 quality of procurement planning • Scalable within each result. - SDR 10,785 for timely fiduciary reporting - SDR 10,785 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - SDR 10,785 for transparency of ACE expenses - SDR 10,785 for Quality of procurement planning Allocated amount: 345,120 43,140 86,280 64,710 86,280 64,710 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 503,300 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 1 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 2 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 2 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 1 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 2 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 1 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact Not scalable. • University-wide regional strategy: - SDR 71,900. • Open, merit-based competitive selection: - SDR 143,800 for the head of institution - SDR 35,950 for a dean • Accreditation step: - SDR 143,800 for international accreditation - SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation • PASET Benchmarking - SDR 35,950 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional impact: SDR 143,800 per institutional impact milestone Allocated amount: 503,300 0 143,800 107,850 107,850 143,800 Total IDA Financing 6,500,000 1,096,410 1,093,725 1,763,800 1,652,620 893,445   Table 7.2(e) Summary of Senegal Financing DLI Total Financing (EUR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 1 188 000 0 4 0 0 0 0 EUR 297,000 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone. Allocated amount: 1,188,000 1,188,000 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Center 698,560 0 0 8 8 16 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). EUR 21,830 per point in the score. Allocated amount: 698,560 0 174,640 174,640 349,280 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 1,872,340 0 10 PhD students 40 Master students 80 Short course professional students 0 first degree students 20 PhD students 50 Master students 80 Short course professional students 0 first degree students 24 PhD students 50 Master students 80 Short course professional students 0 first degree students 24 PhD students 50 Master students 120 Short course professional students 0 first degree students 32 PhD students 60 Master students 200 Short course professional students 0 first degree students Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. • PhD students: - EUR 8,730 per male national student - EUR 11,000 per female national student - EUR 11,000 per male regional student - EUR 13,600 per female regional student • Master Students: - EUR 1,750 per national student - EUR 2,200 per female student - EUR 3,750 per regional student - EUR 4,400 per regional female student • Short-course professional: - EUR 350 per national student - EUR 435 per female student - EUR 700 per regional student - EUR 870 per female regional student • First degree Students: - EUR 870 per national male student - EUR 1,305 per national female student Allocated amount: 1,872,340 0 227,100 347,530 385,950 405,160 506,600 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 3,995,920 0 0 accredi-tation steps 24 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 2 accredi-tation steps 24 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 2 accredi-tation steps 24 published research articles 2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 6 accredi-tation steps 24 published research articles 2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 0 accredi-tation steps 24 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure • Accreditation step (not scalable per step): - EUR 262,000 per program intl. accredited - EUR 87,320 per program nat./reg. accredited - EUR 87,320 per gap/self-evaluation - EUR 43,660 for new/revamped courses • Research publication (scalable per article): - EUR 8,730 per article co-authored by ACE - EUR 13,095 per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone): - EUR 262,000 per milestone 3,995,920 260,000 347,320 871,320 1,657,280 260,000 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 1,756,400 0 66,000 in revenue 30 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 205,460 in revenue 60 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 292,000 in revenue 60 Internships 2 Entre-preneur milestones 386,000 in revenue 60 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 380,000 in revenue 80 internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External revenue: - EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources - EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies • Internships: - EUR 870 per period in country - EUR 1,305 per period in region • Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable): EUR 87,320 for the milestone 1,756,400 92,100 257,660 518,840 438,200 449,600 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 1,048,000 0 4 Timely Fiduciary reporting 4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 4 transparency of ACE expenses 4 quality of procurement planning 4 Timely Fiduciary reporting 4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 4 transparency of ACE expenses 4 quality of procurement planning 4 Timely Fiduciary reporting 4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 4 transparency of ACE expenses 4 quality of procurement planning 4 Timely Fiduciary reporting 4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 4 transparency of ACE expenses 4 quality of procurement planning 4 Timely Fiduciary reporting 4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 4 transparency of ACE expenses 4 quality of procurement planning • Scalable within each result. - EUR 13,100 for timely fiduciary reporting - EUR 13,100 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - EUR 13,100 for transparency of ACE expenses EUR 13,100 for Quality of procurement planning 1,048,000 209,600 209,600 209,600 209,600 209,600 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 1,440,780 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 2 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 2 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 2 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 2 PASET Benchmarking 3 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 4 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact Not scalable. • University-wide regional strategy: - SDR 71,900. • Open, merit-based competitive selection: - SDR 143,800 for the head of institution - SDR 35,950 for a dean • Accreditation step: - SDR 143,800 for international accreditation - SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation • PASET Benchmarking - SDR 35,950 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional impact: SDR 143,800 per institutional impact milestone 1,440,780 0 261,960 130,980 349,280 698,560 Total IDA Financing 11,400,000 1,976,800 1,598,710 2,291.330 3,408,800 2,124,360 Table 7.2(f) Summary of Benin Financing DLI Total Financing (SDR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 176,000 4 0 0 0 0 SDR 220 000 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone. Allocated amount: 176,000 176,000 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center 58,640 0 4 4 8 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). SDR 18,325 per point in the score. Allocated amount: 58,640 0 14,660 14,660 29,320 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 385,470 0 3 PhD students 5 Master students 14 Short course professional students 5 PhD students 11 Master students 16 Short course professional students 6 PhD students 12 Master students 22 Short course professional students 6 PhD students 12 Master students 22 Short course professional students 6 PhD students 12 Master students 22 Short course professional students Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. • PhD students: - SDR 7330 per male national student, - SDR 9160 per female national student, - SDR 9160 per male regional student, - (SDR 11450 per female regional student. • Master students: - SDR 1470 per national student, - SDR 1830 per female student, - SDR 1830 per regional student - SDR 3660 per regional female student. • Short-course professional students: - SDR 295 per national male student, - SDR 370 per female national student, - SDR 590 per regional male student, - SDR 730 per female regional student. • First degree students: - SDR 730 per national male student, - SDR 1100 per national female student Allocated amount: 385,470 0 43,000 76,070 88,000 88,000 88,000 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 682,130 0 0 accredi-tation steps 3 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 4 accredi-tation steps 5 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 3 accredi-tation steps 5 published research articles 3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 2 accredi-tation steps 5 published research articles 4 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 1 accredi-tation steps 4 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure • Accreditation step (not scalable per step): - SDR 220,000 per program intl. accredited - SDR 73,300 per program nat./reg. accredited - SDR 73,300 per gap/self-evaluation - SDR 36,650 for new/revamped courses • Research publication (scalable per article): - SDR 7,330 per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners; - SDR 11,000 per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone): - SDR 220 000 per milestone 682,130 28,600 67,330 221,000 283,200 82,000 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 654,400 0 30,000 in revenue 9 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 112,000 in revenue 19 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 132,000 in revenue 20 Internships 2 Entre-preneur milestones 152,000 in revenue 20 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 110,940 in revenue 20 internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External revenue: - EUR 1 for each EUR generated from national non-company sources - EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies; • Internship: - EUR 915 per period in country - EUR 1375 per period in region • Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable): - EUR 91 500 for the milestone. 654,400 38,235 129,385 186,900 170,300 129,580 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 145,600 0 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 0 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 1 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning Scalable within each result. - USD 15,000 (EUR 14000) for timely fiduciary reporting - USD 15,000 (EUR 14000) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - USD 15,000 (EUR 14000) for transparency of ACE expenses • USD 15,000 (EUR 14000) for Quality of procurement planning 145,600 16,800 33,600 33,600 28,000 33,600 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 197,760 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 2 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 2 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 2 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 2 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 2 PASET Benchmarking 1 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 2 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 2 Milestones on institutional impact Not scalable. • University-wide regional strategy: - SDR 73 300 • Open, merit-based competitive selection: - SDR 146 600 for the head of institution - SDR 36650 for a dean; • International Accreditation - SDR 146 600 for international accreditation - SDR 55 000 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation • PASET Benchmarking - SDR 36650 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional Impact - SDR 73 300 per institutional impact milestone 197,760 0 44,000 22,000 43,980 87,780 Total IDA Financing (SDR) 1 500 000 247,600 202,060 346,460 445,300 258,580 Total IDA Financing (EUR) 800,000 55,035 162,985 220,500 198,300 163,180 Table 7.2(g) Summary of The Gambia Financing DLI Total Financing (SDR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 990,000 0 2 0 0 0 0 Not scalable within each milestone USD 675,000 (SDR 495,000) per milestone. Allocated amount: 990,000 990,000 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center 264,000 0 0 0 4 4 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). USD 45,000 (SDR 33,000) per point in the score. Allocated amount: 264,000 0 0 132,000 132,000 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 1,247,000 0 0 PhD students 0 Master students 0 Short course professional students 120 Bachelor students 0 PhD students 0 Master students 0 Short course professional students 180 Bachelor students 0 PhD students 0 Master students 20 Short course professional students 300 Bachelor students 0 PhD students 0 Master students 40 Short course professional students 360 Bachelor students 0 PhD students 0 Master students 120 Short course professional students 420 Bachelor students Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. Unless otherwise agreed with the government in the Regional Operational Manual, the Center can achieve the DLI through any combination of the student types (with exception that 30 percent of students must be regional). • PhD students: - USD 10,000 (SDR 7330) per male national student, - USD 12,500 (SDR 9125)per female national student, - USD 12,500 (SDR 9125) per male regional student, - USD 15,600 (SDR 14450) per female regional student. • Master Students: - USD 2,000 (SDR 1470) per national student, - USD 2,500 (SDR 1835) per female student, - USD 4,000 (SDR 2940) per regional student - 5,000 (SDR 3670) per regional female student. • Short-course professional students: - USD 400 (SDR 300) per national male student, - USD 500 (370) per female national student, 800 (SDR 590) per regional male student, a - 1000 (SDR 730) per female regional student. • Bachelor Students: - 1,000 (SDR 730) per national male student, - 1,500 (SDR 1100) per national female student Allocated amount: 1,247,000 0 103,000 154,000 264,000 323,000 403,000 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 2,615,200 0 2 accredi-tation steps 0 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 3 accredi-tation steps 0 published research articles 1 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 1 accredi-tation steps 0 published research articles 3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 1 accredi-tation steps 5 published research articles 3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 1 accredi-tation steps 5 published research articles 2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure • Accreditation Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step: - US$ 300,000 (SDR 220,000) per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency; - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per program nationally/regionally accredited; - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken; - US$ 50,000 (SDR 36,650) for new/revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board. • Research publication: Scalable per article. Amounts: - US$ 10,000 (SDR 7330) per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners; - US$ 15,000 (SDR 11,000) per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure, the result is not scalable within each milestone. - US$ 300,000 (SDR 220,000) per milestone 2,615,200 73,300 366,600 733,300 742,000 700,000 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 824,950 0 57,000 in revenue 0 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 75,000 in revenue 20 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 104,000 in revenue 30 Internships 1 Entre-preneur milestones 130,000 in revenue 60 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 173,650 in revenue 80 internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External revenue, - US$ 1 for each US$ 1 generated from national non-firm sources or international sources; - US$ 2 for each US$ 1 generated from regional or private sources; • Internship, - US$ 1,000 (SDR 730) per period in country - US$ 1,500 (SDR 1100) per period in region • Entrepreneurship Not scalable - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300) for the milestone. 824,950 57,000 89,600 199,200 173,800 305,350 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 374,000 0 0 Timely Fiduciary reporting 0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 1 transparency of ACE expenses 0 quality of procurement planning 1 Timely Fiduciary reporting 1 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 1 transparency of ACE expenses 1 quality of procurement planning 1 Timely Fiduciary reporting 1 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 1 transparency of ACE expenses 1 quality of procurement planning 1 Timely Fiduciary reporting 1 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 1 transparency of ACE expenses 1 quality of procurement planning 1 Timely Fiduciary reporting 1 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 1 transparency of ACE expenses 1 quality of procurement planning Scalable within each result. For instance, disbursement can take place for the reports that were timely submitted even if other reports were submitted with a delay. - US$ 30 000 (SDR 22,000) for timely fiduciary reporting - US$ 30 000 (SDR 22,000) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - - USD 30 000 (SDR 22,000) for Web transparency of ACE expenditures - USD 30 000 (SDR 22,000) for Quality of procurement planning 374,000 22,000 88,000 88,000 88,000 88,000 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 384,850 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 1 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 1 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 1 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 1 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 1 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 1 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact Not scalable. • University-wide regional strategy: - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300) • Open, merit-based competitive selection of the head of institution: - US$ 200,000 (SDR 146,600) - US$ 50,000 (SDR 36,650) for an open and merit-based competitive selection of a dean; • Accrediatation step - US$ 200,000 (SDR 146,600) for - Institutional international accreditation; - US $ 75,000 (SDR 55,000) each for gap assessment/self-evaluation. • PASET Benchmarking - US$ 50,000 (SDR 36,650) for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional Impact - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per institutional impact milestone 384,850 0 109,950 55,000 73,300 146,600 Total IDA Financing 6,700,000 1,245,300 808,150 1,471,500 1,532,100 1,642,950 Table 7.2(h) Summary of Nigeria Financing DLI Total Financing (SDR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 2,444,444 0 20 0 0 0 0 USD 300,000 (SDR 220000) per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone ( NOT APPLICABLE FOR RENEWAL CENTERS) Allocated amount: 2,444,444 2,444,444 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center 1,449,711 0 0 28 40 68 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). - USD 25,000 (SDR 18325) per point in the score Allocated amount: 1,449,711 0 317,633 407,222 724,856 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 6,537,778 0 68 PhD students 99 Master students 207 Short course professional students 85 PhD students 176 Master students 263 Short course professional students 108 PhD students 176 Master students 328 Short course professional students 108 PhD students 198 Master students 494 Short course professional students 108 PhD students 226 Master students 494 Short course professional students Scalable per student. • PhD students: - USD 10,000 (SDR 7330) per male national student, - USD 12,500 (SDR 9160) per female national student, - USD 12,500(SDR 9160) per male regional student, - USD 15,600 (SDR 11450) per female regional student. • Master Students: - USD 2,000 (1470) per national student, - USD 2,500 (SDR 1830) per female student, USD 4,000 (SDR 2930) per regional student - 5,000 ((SDR 3670) per regional female student. • short-course professional students: - USD 400 (SDR 295) per national male student - ,USD 500 (SDR 370) per female national student, - USD 800 (SDR 590) per regional male student, - USD 1000 (SDR 730) per female regional student. • Bachelor Students: - USD 1,000 (SDR 730) per national male student, - USD 1,500 (SDR 1100) per national female student Allocated amount: 6,537,778 0 860,556 1,188,667 1,418,889 1,505,667 1,564,000 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 11,085,278 0 0 accredi-tation steps 71 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 27 accredi-tation steps 71 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 10 accredi-tation steps 99 published research articles 27 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 10 accredi-tation steps 99 published research articles 10 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 10 accredi-tation steps 99 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure For accreditation Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step: - US$ 300,000 (SDR 220 000) per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency; - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per program nationally/regionally accredited; - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken; - US$ 50,000 (SDR 36650) for new/revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board. • Research publication: Scalable per article. Amounts: - US$ 10,000 (SDR 7330) per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners; - US$ 15,000 (SDR 11 000) per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure, the result is not scalable within each milestone. - US$ 300,000 (SDR 220 000) per milestone 11,085,278 625,778 1,192,167 4,675,222 2,499,667 2,092,444 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 9,918,311 0 705,333 in revenue 99 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 1,430,556 in revenue 241 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 1,778,667 in revenue 297 Internships 17 Entre-preneur milestones 2,244,222 in revenue 408 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 1,934,000 in revenue 463 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External revenue, - US$ 1 for each US$ 1 (SDR 1 for each SDR 1) generated from national non-firm sources or international sources; - US$ 2 for each US$ 1 (SDR 2 for each SDR 1) generated from regional or private sources; • Internship, - US$ 1,000 (SDR 730) per period in country - US$ 1,500 (SDR 1100) per period in region • Entrepreneurship milestone - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) for the milestone. Not scalable 9,918,311 777,522 1,606,567 2,720,089 2,541,900 2,272,233 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 1,896,889 0 7 Timely Fiduciary reporting 17 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 17 transparency of ACE expenses 0 quality of procurement planning 17 Timely Fiduciary reporting 17 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 17 transparency of ACE expenses 17 quality of procurement planning 17 Timely Fiduciary reporting 0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 17 transparency of ACE expenses 17 quality of procurement planning 17 Timely Fiduciary reporting 17 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 17 transparency of ACE expenses 17 quality of procurement planning 17 Timely Fiduciary reporting 17 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 17 transparency of ACE expenses 17 quality of procurement planning Scalable within each result - US$ 15 000 (SDR 11000) for timely fiduciary reporting - US$ 15 000 (SDR 11000) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - USD 15 000 (SDR 11000) for Web transparency of ACE expenditures - - USD 15 000 (SDR 11000) for Quality of procurement planning 1,896,889 265,222 435,111 326,333 435,111 435,111 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 7,067,589 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 17 ICT services for innovation in teaching and research 10 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 17 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 17 ICT services for innovation in teaching and research 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 17 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 17 ICT services for innovation in teaching and research 7 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 17 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 17 ICT services for innovation in teaching and research 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 17 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 17 ICT services for innovation in teaching and research Not scalable. - University-wide regional strategy: US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) • Open, merit-based competitive selection of the head of institution: - US$ 200,000 (SDR 146 600) - US$ 50,000 (SDR 36650) for an open and merit-based competitive selection of a dean; • International accreditation; - US$ 200,000 (SDR 146 600) for Institutional international accreditation; • PASET Benchmarking - US $ 75,000 (SDR 55 000) each for gap assessment/self-evaluation. - US$ 50,000 (SDR 36650) for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional Impact - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per institutional impact milestone • ICT services for innovation in teaching and research - US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per year for a single or bundle of services 7,067,589 724,856 1,494,506 1,268,744 1,404,917 2,174,567 Total IDA Financing 40,400,000 5,698,378 6,234,650 10,816,500 9,112,117 8,538,356 Table 7.2(i) Summary of Niger Financing DLI Total Financing (SDR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 1,320,000 0 6 0 0 0 0 USD 300,000 (SDR 220,000) per milestone Not scalable within each milestone.. Allocated amount: 1,320,000 1,320,000 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center 439,200 0 0 8 4 12 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). USD 25,000 (SDR 18300) per point in the score. Allocated amount: 439,200 0 146,400 73,200 219,600 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 1,889,200 0 2 PhD students 20 Master students 10 Short course professional students 5 PhD students 60 Master students 90 Short course professional students 20 PhD students 100 Master students 100 Short course professional students 20 PhD students 100 Master students 160 Short course professional students 20 PhD students 105 Master students 160 Short course professional students Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. • PhD students: - USD 10,000 (SDR 7330) per male national student, - USD 12,500 (SDR 9160) per female national student, - USD 12,500 (SDR 9160) per male regional student, - USD 15,600 (SDR 11450) per female regional student. • Master Students: - USD 2000 (SDR 1470) per national male student, - USD 2500 (SDR 1830) per national female student, - USD 4000 (SDR 2930) per regional male student - USD 5000 (SDR 3660) per regional female student. • Short-course professional and first-degree students: - USD 400 (SDR 295) per national male student, - USD 500 (SDR 370) per national female student, - USD 800 (SDR 590) per regional male student, - USD 1000 (SDR 730) per female regional student. • Bachelor Students: - UDS 1000 (SDR 730) per national male students, - USD 1500 (SDR 1100) per national female student. Allocated amount: 1,889,200 0 110,000 337,000 466,000 483,000 493,200 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 3,751,600 0 0 accredi-tation steps 11 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 7 accredi-tation steps 11 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 2 accredi-tation steps 18 published research articles 6 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 1 accredi-tation steps 18 published research articles 3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 2 accredi-tation steps 20 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure • For accreditation Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step: - USD 300,000 (SDR 220,000)per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency; - USD 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per program nationally/regionally accredited; - USD 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken; - USD 50,000 (SDR 36,650) revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board. • Research publication: Scalable per article. Amounts: - USD 10,000 (SDR 7330) per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty; - USD 15,000 (SDR 11000) per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure, the result is not scalable within each milestone. - USD 300,000 (SDR 220,000) per milestone 3,751,600 92,000 387,600 1,622,000 1,037,000 613,000 Total IDA Financing 7 400 000 1522 000 871 000 2 161 200 1 739 600 1 106 200 DLI Total Financing (EUR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 1,920,325 0 74,000 in revenue 30 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 295,000 in revenue 120 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 337,000 in revenue 130 Internships 1 Entre-preneur milestones 337,000 in revenue 130 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 287,150 in revenue 135 internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External Revenue, - EUR 1 for each EUR generated from national non-company sources or international sources; - EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies; • Internship, - USD 1000 (EUR 915) per period in country - USD 1500 (EUR 1375) per period in region • Entrepreneurship milestone - USD 100,000 (EUR 91500) for the milestone. Not scalable. 1,920,325 101,450 404,800 547,450 455,950 410,675 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 658,800 0 0 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 0 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 0 quality of procurement planning Scalable within each result. - USD 15,000 (EUR 13725) for timely fiduciary reporting - USD 15,000 (EUR 13725) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - USD 15,000 (EUR 13725) for transparency of ACE expenses - USD 15,000 (EUR 13725) for Quality of procurement planning 658,800 82,350 164,700 123,525 164,700 123,525 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 1,120,875 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 1 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 3 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 3 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 2 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 3 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 1 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 2 Milestones on institutional impact Not scalable. • University-wide regional strategy: - USD 100,000 (EUR 91500) • Open, merit-based competitive selection of the head of institution: - USD 200,000 (EUR 183000) - USD 50,000 (EUR 45750) for an open and merit-based competitive selection of a dean; • Accreditation Step - USD 200,000 (EUR 183000) for international accreditation; - USD 75,000 (EUR 68625) each for gap assessment/self-evaluation. • PASET Benchmarking - USD 50,000 (EUR 45750) for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional Impact - USD 100,000 (EUR 91500) per institutional impact milestone 1,120,875 0 228,750 205,875 320,250 366,000 Total IDA Financing 3,700,000 183,800 798,250 876,850 940,900 900,200 Table 7.2(j) Summary of Togo Financing DLI Total Financing (EUR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 DLI 1: Institutional readiness results 1 100 000 0 4 0 0 0 0 USD 300,000 (EUR 275 000) per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone. Allocated amount: 1 100 000 1 100 000 0 0 0 0 DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center 552 000 0 0 4 8 12 0 Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5). - USD 25,000 (EUR 23 000) per point in the score. Allocated amount: 552 000 0 92 000 184 000 276 000 0 DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization 2,603,000 0 24 PhD students 45 Master students 90 Short course professional students 28 PhD students 55 Master students 110 Short course professional students 28 PhD students 65 Master students 170 Short course professional students 28 PhD students 65 Master students 170 Short course professional students 28 PhD students 65 Master students 170 Short course professional students Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. • PhD students: - USD 10,000 (EUR 9150) per male national student, - USD 12,500 (EUR 11 500) per female national student, - USD 12,500 (EUR 11 500) per male regional student, - USD 15,600 (EUR 14 300) per female regional student. • Master Students: - USD 2000 (EUR 1830) per national male student, - USD 2500 (EUR 2300) per national female student, - USD 4000 (EUR 3660) per regional male student - USD 5000 (EUR 4580) per regional female student. • Short-course professional and first-degree students: - USD 400 (EUR 360) per national male student, - USD 500 (EUR 460) per national female student, - USD 800 (EUR 730) per regional male student, - USD 1000 (EUR 915) per female regional student. • Bachelor Students: - UDS 1000 (EUR 915) per national male students, - USD 1500 (EUR 1370) per national female student. Allocated amount: 2,603,,000 0 422 000 504 000 559 000 559 000 559 000 DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure 4,945,000 0 0 accredi-tation steps 30 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 5 accredi-tation steps 30 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 2 accredi-tation steps 30 published research articles 5 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 2 accredi-tation steps 30 published research articles 2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure 2 accredi-tation steps 40 published research articles 0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure • Accreditation Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step: - USD 300,000 (EUR 275 000) per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency; - USD 100,000 (EUR 91 500) per program nationally/regionally accredited; - USD 100,000 (EUR 91 500) per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken; - USD 50,000 (EUR 45 750) revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board. - • Research publication: Scalable per article. Amounts: - USD 10,000 (EUR 9150) per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty; - USD 15,000 (EUR 13 700) per article co-authored with regional partners. • Teaching and research infrastructure, the result is not scalable within each milestone. - USD 300,000 (EUR 275 000) per milestone Allocated amount: 4,945,000 352 000 580 500 1 919 500 1 090 000 1 003 000 Total IDA Financing 9,200,000 1 874 000 1 176 500 2 662 500 1 925 000 1 562 000 DLI Total Financing (SDR) DLI DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement Formula Baseline Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship 2, 263,700 0 113 500 in revenue 70 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 367,000 in revenue 85 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 480,000 in revenue 85 Internships 3 Entre-preneur milestones 480,000 in revenue 85 Internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones 304,000 in revenue 85 internships 0 Entre-preneur milestones • External revenue, - USD 1 for each USD 1 (SDR 1 for each SDR 1) generated from national non-company sources or international sources; - USD 2 for each USD 1 (SDR 2 for each SDR 1) generated from regional sources or companies; • Internship, - USD 1000 (SDR 730) per period in country - USD 1500 (SDR 1100) per period in region • Entrepreneurship milestone - USD 100,000 (SDR 73 300) for the milestone. Not scalable. Allocated amount: 2,263,700 164 600 429 050 761 950 542 050 366 050 DLI 6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management 605,000 0 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 0 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 2 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning 3 Timely Fiduciary reporting 3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt 3 transparency of ACE expenses 3 quality of procurement planning - USD 15,000 (SDR 11 000) for timely fiduciary reporting - USD 15,000 (SDR 11 000) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management - USD 15,000 (SDR 11 000) for transparency of ACE expenses - USD 15,000 (SDR 11 000) for Quality of procurement planning Allocated amount: 605,000 88,000 132,000 132,000 121,000 132,000 DLI 7: Institutional Impact 1,631,300 0 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 1 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 3 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 3 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 0 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 0 Institutional accreditation steps 3 PASET Benchmarking 7 Milestones on institutional impact 0 University regional strategy 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean 3 Institutional accreditation steps 0 PASET Benchmarking 3 Milestones on institutional impact Not scalable. University-wide regional strategy: USD 100,000 (SDR 73 300) • Open, merit-based competitive selection of the head of institution: - USD 200,000 (SDR 146 600) - USD 50,000 (SDR 36 700) for an open and merit-based competitive selection of a dean; • International Accreditation - USD 200,00 (SDR 146 600) for international accreditation; - USD 75,000 (SDR 55 000) each for gap assessment/self-evaluation. • PASET Benchmarking - USD 50,000 (SDR 36 700) for each year the university participates (up to 2 years) • Institutional Impact - USD 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per institutional impact milestone Allocated amount: 1,631,300 0 183,400 165,000 623,200 659,700 Total IDA Financing 4,500,000 252,600 744,450 1,058,950 1,286,250 1,157,750 Table 7.3 Overall Financing per Country and type of ACE Selected Centers DLI 1 Institutional Readiness DLI 2 Development Impact DLI 3 Students Enrolment DLI 4 Education and Research Quality DLI 5 Education and Research Relevance DLI 6 Financial Management DLI 7 Institutional impact TOTAL Burkina Faso (DLI 1 & 7 in SDR and DLI 2 to 6 in EURO) In EURO In SDR 1 Center of Excellence for Training and Research in Water, Energy and Environment Sciences and Technologies in West and Central Africa (ACE-2iE) 0 174,640 639,675 1,091,660 929,285 262,000 376,000 3,097,260 376,000 2 Center of Excellence for Social Risk Management - CESES 0 174,640 519,500 1,039,320 175,500 262,000 0 2,170,960 0 3 Center of Excellence for Training, Research and Expertise in Drug Sciences of the University of Ouagadougou I 666,000 174,640 956,680 2,823,620 1,390,935 262,000 413,000 5,607,875 1,079,000 4 Center of Excellence for Bio-technological Innovation for the Elimination of Vector- Borne Diseases of the Université Nazi Boni 666,000 174,640 956,680 2,823,620 1,390,935 262,000 413,000 5,607,875 1,079,000 5 College of Engineering of the International Institute of Water and Environment Engineering 2iE 666,000 0 563,750 1,433,640 539,600 222,700 0 2,759,690 666,000 Djibouti (SDR) 1 Emerging Center for Logistics and Transport of the University of Djibouti 647,120 201,320 785,990 1,819,100 909,620 323,550 377,475 5,064,175 2 College of Engineering of the University of Djibouti 647,120 0 567,340 2,027,615 770,200 323,550 0 4,335,825 Ghana (SDR) 1 West African Centre for Cell Biology of Infectious Pathogens of the University of Ghana Legon 0 172,560 775,500 1,081,285 1,253,900 316,400 143,800 3,743,445 2 West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement of the University of Ghana Legon 0 172,560 775,500 1,081,285 1,253,900 316,400 197,725 3,797,370 3 Regional Centre for Water and Environmental Sanitation of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology University 0 172,560 775,500 1,081,285 1,253,900 316,400 287,600 3,887,245 4 Regional Transport Research and Education Center, of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology 611,160 172,560 701,165 1,294,315 1,144,100 316,400 305,575 4,545,275 5 Regional Center for Energy and Environmental Sustainability of the University of Energy & Natural Resources 611,160 172,560 701,165 1,294,315 1,144,100 316,400 557,225 4,796,925 6 West African Center for Water, Irrigation and Sustainable Agriculture of the University of Development Studies 611,160 172,560 701,165 1,294,315 1,144,100 316,400 557,225 4,796,925 7 Center of Excellence for Coastal Resilience of the University of Cape Coast 611,160 172,560 701,165 1,294,315 1,144,100 316,400 557,225 4,796,925 8 West African Genetic Medicine Centre of the University of Ghana 611,160 172,560 701,165 1,294,315 1,144,100 316,400 395,450 4,635,150 9 College of Engineering of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology 607,160 0 744,380 1,006,620 1,308,205 316,400 0 3,982,765 Guinea (SDR) 1 Center of Excellence Prevention and Control of Communicable Diseases of the University of Gamal Abdel Nasser of Conakry 431,410 143,800 587,475 1,351,740 563,955 172,560 377,475 3,628,415 2 Emerging Center for Mines and Societies of the Higher Institute of Mines and Geology of Boké 431,410 143,800 629,555 927,595 440,840 172,560 125,825 2,871,585 Senegal (EURO) 1 Center of Excellence for Mathematics, Computer Science and ICT of the University of Gaston Berger 0 174,640 349,315 322,500 392,500 262,000 261,960 1,762,915 2 Center of Excellence for Maternal and Infant Health of Cheikh Anta Diop University 0 174,640 349,315 322,500 392,500 262,000 174,640 1,675,595 3 Center of Excellence for Environment and Health of Cheikh Anta Diop University 594,000 174,640 586,855 1,375,460 485,700 262,000 502,090 3,980,745 4 Center of Excellence for Agriculture for Food and Nutrition Security of Cheikh Anta Diop University 594,000 174,640 586,855 1,375,460 485,700 262,000 502,090 3,980,745 Benin (DLI 1-4 & 7 in SDR and DLI 5&6 in Euros) 1 ACE: Mathematical Sciences, Computer Science and Applications, University of Abomey Calavi 0 0 0 0 1,135,875 252,000 0 1,387,875 2 ACE: Water and Sanitation (C2EA), University of Abomey Calavi 0 0 0 0 1,098,825 238,000 0 1,336,825 3 Collège of Engineering: Energy, Transport Infrastructures and Environment (CoE-EIE),University of Abomey Calavi 0 0 0 0 1,037,300 238,000 0 1,275,300 Cote D voire (Euro) 1 ACE: Mines and Mining Environment (CEA-MEM) 0 176,000 853,000 929,000 1,083,675 226,100 432,225 3,700,000 2 ACE: Valorization of Waste Products with High Value Added (VALOPRO) 670,000 176,000 899,325 1,866,000 1,018,350 226,100 344,225 5,200,000 3 ACE: Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Agriculture (CCBAD) 0 176,000 864,175 929,000 1,083,675 226,100 421,050 3,700,000 4 ACE: Statistics and Quantitative Economics (ENSEA) 0 176,000 864,175 929,000 1,083,675 226,100 421,050 3,700,000 The Ghambia (SDR) 1 Emerging Center: Science, Technology and Engineering for Entrepreneurship, Gambia Technical Training Institute 990,000 264,000 1,247,000 2,615,200 824,000 374,000 384,850 6,700,000 Niger (DLI 1 to 4 in SDR and DLI 5 to 7 in EURO) 2 Emerging Center: Innovative Teaching/Learning of Mathematics and the Sciences for SSA (CE-IEA-MS4SSA, Université Abdou Moumouni 0 0 0 0 589,875 219,600 343,125 1,152,600 3 Emerging Center: Mining Environment EMIG 0 0 0 0 589,875 219,600 343,125 1,152,600 4 ACE: Pastoral Productions – Meat, Milk, Leather and Skins (CERPP), Université Abdou Moumouni 0 0 0 0 740,575 219,600 434,625 1,394,800 Nigeria (SDR) 1 ACE: Genomics of Infectious Diseases (ACEGID), Redeemer's University 0 146,600 717,500 696,650 1,188,200 198,000 714,700 3,661,650 2 ACE: Neglected Tropical Diseases and Forensic Biotechnology (ACENTDFB), Ahmadu Bello University 0 146,600 717,500 696,650 1,188,200 198,000 714,700 3,661,650 3 ACE: Reproductive Health Innovation (CERHI), University of Benin 0 146,600 717,500 696,650 1,188,200 198,000 714,700 3,661,650 4 ACE: Dry Land Agriculture (CDA), Bayero University, Kano 0 146,600 717,500 696,650 1,188,200 198,000 714,700 3,661,650 5 ACE: Food Technology and Research (CEFTER) , Benue State University 0 146,600 717,500 696,650 1,188,200 198,000 714,700 3,661,650 6 ACE: OAU ICT-DRIVEN KNOWLEDGE PARK (OAU-OAK), Obafemi Awolowo University 0 146,600 717,500 696,650 1,188,200 198,000 714,700 3,661,650 7 ACE: Oilfield Chemicals Research (CEFOR), University of Port Harcourt 0 146,600 717,500 696,650 1,188,200 198,000 714,700 3,661,650 8 ACE: Public Health and Toxicological Research, University of Port Harcourt 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 9 ACE: Centre for Population Health and Policy, Bayero University, Kano 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 10 ACE: Covenant Applied Informatics and Communication, Covenant University 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 11 ACE: Technology Enhanced Learning (ACETEL), National Open University of Nigeria 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 12 ACE: Innovative and Transformations Stem Education (CITSE), Lagos State University 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 13 ACE: Mycotoxin and Food Safety, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 14 ACE: Drug Research, Herbal Medicine Development and Regulatory Science, University of Lagos 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 15 ACE: New Pedagogy in Engineering Education (ACENPEE), Ahmadu Belo University 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 16 ACE: Sustainable Power and Energy Development (ACE_SPED), University of Nigeria Nsukka 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 17 ACE: Future Energies and Electrochemical Systems, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria 440,000 146,600 614,000 1,451,900 858,401 187,000 714,700 4,412,601 Togo (DLI 1 to 4 in EURO and DLI 5 to 7 in SDR) 1 ACE: Poultry Science (CERSA), University of Lomé 0 184,000 725,000 903,000 0 0 0 1,812,000 2 ACE: Power Management (CERME), University of Lomé 550,000 184,000 1,878,000 4,042,000 0 0 0 6,654,000 3 ACE: Sustainable Cities in Africa (DOUNEDON), University of Lomé 550,000 184,000 1,878,000 4,042,000 0 0 0 6,654,000
8. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND DISBURSEMENT
a) General Guidelines for process for first disbursement for the Africa Centres of Excellence for Development Impact

95. The first withdrawal application is based upon achievement of DLI 1. Following the disbursement process described in the Operations Manual and experience with the disbursement process under ACE I, kindly find below the disbursement processes that each ACE will need to follow.

• Step 1: The Government through the National Review Committee will review and submit information to the World Bank and or AFD (where applicable) with copy to the AAU regarding the achievement of the preparation and qualification results (DLI 1 – Year 0). DLI is that the Conditions for Effectiveness have been met.

• Step 2: Each ACE must ensure that the appropriate documents are provided to AAU (responsible independent verification agency) who will provide a letter to the WB and/or AFD confirming that DLI 1 has been met. This information will be supplemented with expenditures in the Eligible Expenditure Programme (primarily salaries). This first disbursement is planned to amount to about 10% of the agreed ACE Impact support for most of the New centers. Renewals do not get any funding for achievement of DLI 1 but it is a pre-requisite for them to receive funding for other achieved DLI’s

• Step 3: Obtain letter from independent verification agency (AAU) that DLI 1 has been met. AAU will independently verify that DLI 1 has been met following submission from ACE, to AAU with copy to WB . AAU will then provide letter independently verifying the achievement of DLI1. Attached is sample letter provided by AAU to WB and Government.

• Step 4 : Following the obtaining of evidence on achieving DLI1, log in to client connection to submit withdrawal application for the amount of the DLI1 (DLI amount is similar across country. See Tables 3 above for the amount per country). This will be done using the form 2380 accessible through Client Connection (https://clientconnection.worldbank.org). The form will be accompanied by the approved resolution as per DLI 1 in Schedule 4 of the Financing Agreement and the details of the bank account where the reimbursement will be sent to. The project accountants will include in the application (i) the AAU letter certifying achievement of DLI 1 and (ii) the EEP , ie salaries of staff related to the ACE upon which the WB will reimburse.

• Step 5: The funds flow through which the disbursement is made from World Bank and/or AFD to respective country/ACE is different for each country. Below is the expected step process for each respective country based on negotiations and signed financing agreements and disbursement letters.
b) General funds flow arrangement
96. Bank Accounts: The following bank accounts will be opened for the ACE Impact implementing entities:

Project Account will be opened for funds to be received by the ACE sent by the Ministry of Finance or funds received in a DA denominated in foreign currency and there is need to open an account in local currency to make payments in that currency. The Project Account will be opened at a commercial bank acceptable to the IDA or the Central Bank depending on national and university procedures/guidelines. This account will also serve as the depository for government counterpart fund contributions were applicable. Funds sent to the ACE Impact Project Account will be used for ACE Impact eligible investments.

97. There will be at least two signatories required for each approved payment from the above accounts subject to national and university procedures/guidelines. The two signatories should come from two categories. The first category should comprise the project’s management and the second, the staff accounting for the project’s funds. The signatories will be communicated to the IDA and/or AFD together with the bank account details after the signing of the project but before the project’s effectiveness. The funds from both bank accounts must be used only for eligible expenditures.

c) Funds Flow Arrangements of ACE Impact Project in Nigeria 98. Bank Accounts: The following bank accounts will be opened for the ACE Impact project:
A. One Reimbursement ACE Impact Project Account will be opened by NUC for funds to be received from the WB in US$ and there is need to open an account in local currency to make payments and transfers to ACEs in the local currency. The Project Account will be opened at the Central Bank of Nigeria. This account will also serve as the depository for government counterpart fund contributions were applicable. Funds sent to the ACE Impact Project Account will be used for ACE Impact eligible investments.

The authorization/approvals for the release of these funds to the ACEs and for the PIU operations shall be made by the Head of the PIU in accordance with the rules of the Project. However, he/she shall de-brief the Executive Secretary on a monthly basis or during the bi-annual National Review Committee meetings.

B. Signatories. There will be at least two signatories required for each approved payment from the above ACE Impact Project account. The two signatories should come from the below two categories.
Signatories (Two Panels)
i. Panel A (Main)…………………Project Coordinator (NUC)
ii. Alternate………………………….A Director from NUC or a member of the Project Management team

Panel B (Main)…………………. Project Accountant (NUC) Alternate…………………………Financial Management Officer (NUC)

The signatories will be communicated to the IDA together with the bank account details after the signing of the project but before the project’s effectiveness. The funds from both bank accounts must be used only for eligible expenditures.

C. Each of the ACEs will open Naira accounts following national and university procedures. Thus there will be 17 project accounts. For each ACE Impact account, there will be two signatories, which should come from two categories. The first category should comprise the project’s management and the second, the staff accounting for the project’s funds. The signatories will be communicated to the NUC for information purposes as in the financial management manual per the ACE.

D. Summary of Funds Flow for Nigeria

d) Guidelines for processing first disbursement for the Africa Centres of Excellence for Development Impact Project in Nigeria 99. The first withdrawal application is based upon achievement of DLI 1.
Step 0: NUC will open the ACE Impact Project Reimbursment Account at the Central Bank of Nigeria. The NUC will also open a local Naira account for transfers to the ACEs and share the account details with the World Bank. WB will copy AFD on approval of the accounts.
Step 1: Each ACE will submit to NUC their respective ACE Project accounts (opened in local Naira currency) with names of signatories.
Step 2: Each ACE will submit to NUC the Eligible Expenditure Program (EEPs) , which are primarily salaries.
Step 3: AAU will independently verify that DLI 1 has been met following submission m of the relevant documents by the ACEs and issue a letter to NUC and the WB.
Step 4: The WB will confirm in an email to NUC and the centers (with copy to AFD) the achieved DLIs as well as amounts to be paid out of both the WB and AFD allocations and give clearance for NUC to submit a withdrawal application request. This will include the total amount requested with the EEPs for each ACE and total amount requested should equate the amount of EEPs submitted to the WB and AFD for reimbursement.
Step 5: The NUC Project accountant will log in to client connection to submit withdrawal application for the amount of the DLI1 . This will be done using the form 2380 accessible through Client Connection (https://clientconnection.worldbank.org. The project accountant will include in the application (i) the AAU letter certifying achievement of DLI1 and (ii) the EEP, ie salaries of staff related to the ACEs upon which the WB will reimburse.

e) Funds Flow Arrangements in Ghana
100. Bank Accounts: The following bank accounts will be opened for the ACE Impact Project:

A. A Designated ACE Impact Project Account will be opened by each centre of excellence for development impact for funds to be received from the WB in a DA denominated in foreign currency and there is need to open an account in local currency to make payments and transfers. The Project Account will be opened at a commercial bank acceptable to IDA Funds sent to the ACE Impact Project Account will be used for ACE Impact eligible expenditure as per the financing agreement.

B. Details of the Designated Account ie the name of the account number, list of authorized signatures, and specimen of signatures will be communicated to the IDA together with the bank account details after the signing of the project but before the project’s effectiveness. The funds from both bank accounts must be used only for eligible expenditures.

C. Summary of Funds Flow for Ghana

f) General Guidelines for process for first disbursement for the ACE in Ghana
101. The first withdrawal application is based upon achievement of DLI 1. This first disbursement is planned to amount to 10% of the agreed ACE support. This information will be supplemented with expenditures in the Eligible Expenditure Program (EEPs) , which are primarily salaries.
Step 0: Each ACE will open an ACE Impact Designated Project Account opened in US$ with local account in CEDI with names of signatories.
Step 1: NCTE will prepare the evidence of achievement of DLI 1 by April 30, 2019. DLI is (a) The national representative in the Steering Committee has endorsed a resolution to promote regional specialization among Participating Universities and (b) Conditions for Effectiveness have been met.
This evidence includes:
1. Signed resolution/declaration of intent promoting regional specialization and
2. Evidence of being declared effective by WB (Signed WB letter declaring Ghana effective ie project has met all the effectiveness conditions .
• Step 2: The Government through the National Review and Performance Committee led by NCTE will review and authorize NCTE to submit to the AAU with copy to the World Bank regarding the achievement of the preparation and qualification results (DLI 1 – Year 0).
• Step 3: AAU will independently verify that DLI 1 has been met following submission from NCTE (on behalf of the ACEs) and issue letter to NCTE with copy to WB. Attached is sample letter provided by AAU to WB and Government.
• Step 4: Following DLI verification letter from AAU, NCTE will submit letter to WB to clear ACEs to submit withdrawal application request.
• Step 5: Each ACE Impact Project accountant from each Centre will log in to client connection to submit withdrawal application for the amount of the DLI1 which is SDR 305,580. This will be done using the form 2380 accessible through Client Connection (https://clientconnection.worldbank.org). The project accountant will include in the application (i) the AAU letter certifying achievement of DLI1 and (ii) the EEP report, ie salaries of staff related to the ACEs upon which the WB will reimburse
9. PROCUREMENT
102. General. Procurement activities under the ACE Impact Project will be implemented under Components 1 and 2 by each centre and under Component 3.1 by the RFU hosted within the AAU (Component 3.1), National Council for Tertiary Education of Ghana, the Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation (MESRSI) of Burkina Faso, the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research in Cote d’Ivoire and National Universities Commission of Nigeria (Component 3.2). All activities to be supported under the project will adhere to the World Bank “Guidelines on Preventing and Combating Fraud and Corruption in Projects Financed by IBRD Loans and IDA Credits and Grants, dated October 2006 and revised in January 2011”.

103. For the ACEs (Components 1 and 2) which have a DLI approach, all expenditures to be reimbursed under the ACE Impact project will be part of the Eligible Expenditure Programme (EEP). All expenditure for procurable items in the EEP will follow the World Bank “Guidelines for Procurement of Goods, Works and Non-Consulting Services", dated January 2011 or the World Bank "Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants", dated January 2011, with procurement plans acceptable to IDA. The EEPs for each University/ACE is defined in the above section. The EEPs consist primarily (or exclusively) of non-procurable expenditure, such as salaries and operational costs.

104. Other project expenditure for procurable items, entirely financed by other financing sources, including government budget, can be procured according to national procurement guidelines as described in the approved Procurement Manual of each ACE. The procurement audit must cover all expenditures under the project, including those in the EEP and the Annual Work Plans, and will verify whether the relevant procurement guidelines have been followed.

105. ACE Procurement Plan for all ACE activities (EEPs and others). The procurement plans for the ACEs were reviewed and approved as part of the negotiations. The procurement plans will be subject to updates at least once a year, and if necessary, more frequently and such updates are subject to the World Bank’s review and agreement.

106. For AAU, NCTE, MESRSI, and NUC (Component 3), they will use the World Bank “Guidelines: Procurement of Goods, Works and Non-Consulting Services", dated January 2011 or the World Bank "Guidelines: Selection and Employment of Consultants", dated January 2011, with procurement plans acceptable to IDA. The AAU (RFU), NCTE, MESRSI, and NUC will procure both goods and consultant services, such as computer equipment and simple consultant contracts (works contracts are excluded).

Requests for No Objection:

107. Given the ACE Impact is an IPF with DLI and EEPs are salaries, technically WB procurement processes is for salaries and the center/university is expected to apply the approved procurement manual that uses university procedures.
108. For project financed staff that are recruited to support the ACE Impact project at the center, as per the Financing Agreement the project implementation team needs to be acceptable to the Bank. Thus, it is expected that a no objection on the ToRs have to be provided by the Bank. Additionally, as relevant, a technical opinion from the Bank is provided on the recruitment process to ensure the selected candidates meet the project requirements and the project has followed due process. This is particularly pertinent for both fidiciary positions, where there have been cases where ACEs have recruited financial management staff only for the final candidate not to meet the project requirements and the process having to be restarted.

109. Steps for Requests for No Objection:
a. For the ACEs: The Bank does NOT require prior no objection on any procurement in the approved Procurement plan as long as the procurement will follow the agreed institutional procedures.
b. For the ACEs: The Bank will provide a no objection on n:
- ToRs for fiduciary and safeguard consultants
- ToRs for staff funded by the project including project manager, M&E specialist and other technical posts
c. Once the ToR is obtained, the ACEs will submit for a technican opinion the selection criteria, short list and final evaluation repor of the recrtuiment. This is to ensure that the final selected candidate meets the project expectations and that the ACEs do not select candidates , especially for the fidiciary positions that do not meet the project requirements.
d. All CVs for Fiduciary positions must be cleared by the Bank
e. CVs for technical positions should also be reviewed by Bank given that the implementation team for the project needs to be acceptable to the Association ie Bank as per the FA. However for technical positions, point c is recommended but not mandatory.
f. For the ACEs, The AAU will review:
- Annual procurement plan (together with the annual workplan)
- Procurable items not included in the approved procurement plan
- Procurable items when the agreed procurement procedures are not followed. Hence, any procurements not following the agreed procurement procedures must have the Bank’s prior approval.

g. For Component 3 – AAU, NCTE, MESRSI and NUC: As per standard Bank procurement guidelines
- All ToRs
- All Workshops
- International travel
- Procurements in amounts above the agreed thresholds.
Hence all procurement above these thresholds is subject to the Bank’s prior review (and no objection).

h. For the NUC, the following additional special clauses apply:
- Once the Bank’s No Objection is obtained on (c) above, the authorization/approvals for the release of funds for these activities shall be made by the Head of the PIU in accordance with the rules of the Project.
- For all travels on project related missions, the World Bank rates for the various cities shall apply for the payment of perdiem and hotels. All travels shall be on economy class, except where the trip exceeds five hours and or where there are health concerns. In such instances a no objection would be required.

i. For Burkina Faso (MESRSI) and Ghana (NCTE) procurement thresholds (in USD) are:
Works Goods Consultancy Individual 5m 1.5m 0.5m 0.2m Shopping – Goods above USD100,000 and Works above USD200,000.

j. For the NOC in Côte d'Ivoire, the procedures of the national procedure manual will apply.
110. Compliance with combating fraud and anti-corruption: All activities to be supported under the project will adhere to the World Bank “Guidelines on Preventing and Combating Fraud and Corruption in Projects Financed by IBRD Loans and IDA Credits and Grants, dated October 2006 and revised in January 2011”.

111. Procurement Compliance: The Centres were informed that only procurements emanating from the Approved Work Plan & Budget is eligible on the Procurement Plan. Similarly, only procurable items on the approved Procurement Plan must be procured. Given that the ACE’s implementation is Results Based Linked to DLI, the non-compliance of Procurement provisions in the Legal Agreement leaves the Bank and/or AFD with several options in case of non-compliance: (i) declaring mis-procurement; (ii) Withholding of the Amount for the procurement DLI; (iii) advising that all the procurements going forward shall be prior reviewed; (iv) cause for a forensic procurement audit, and (vi) cancel the Project and stop funding.

112. Things to Avoid: The ACEs should avoid Conflict of Interest, Ineligibilities, Unfair Competitive Advantage, Mis-procurement and Fraud and Corruption practices as they have serious impact on project procurement implementation with heavy sanctions.
ANNEX
ANNEX 1: TERMS OF REFERENCE OF PROJECT COMMITTEES
ANNEX 1.A: TERMS OF REFERENCE OF NATIONAL REVIEW COMMITTEE

I. Introduction
Background Information

1. Project objectives and scope. The World Bank is scaling up the Africa Centers of Excellence in West and Central Africa. The development objective of the new phase, the Africa Higher Education Centers of Excellence for Development Impact (ACE Impact) is to improve the quality, quantity and development impact of postgraduate education in selected universities through regional specialization and collaboration. The higher order objective of this third phase is to meet the demand for skills required for Africa's development, across various priority sectors. Further, ACE Impact will contribute to the strengthening of the best African universities within the STEM, health, Agriculture, Environment, Applied Social Sciences and associated disciplines. Each of the selected centers will focus on a particular development challenge, and over a five-year period will develop a sustainable portfolio of: postgraduate degree (master’s and Ph.D.) programs; strategic applied research; industry and academic partnerships within and outside the region; and short-term training courses for mid-career professionals. Beyond the center-level support, ACE Impact also aims to influence institutional impact of the universities hosting the centers. Host universities are given an opportunity to achieve specific institutional level results aligned with both the vision of the universities and the objective of ACE Impact. Select colleges of engineering will be given support (beyond the centers) to strengthen their programs. ACE Impact is expected to cover 12 countries across Western and Central Africa, with the majority being those countries covered under ACE I and new countries such as Djibouti, Niger and Guinea.

2. Project institutional and implementation arrangements. The Project will be implemented by the selected centers, with project facilitation and coordination support from the Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU). Participating governments and the ECOWAS will steer the project through their representatives on the ACE Impact Project Steering Committee. The role of the key stakeholders are as follows:
(i) Each ACE Impact Center, with support from their respective host universities, will principally be irresponsible for implementing the activities under the project. The individual center is responsible for its strategic planning, proposal preparation and implementation, fiduciary activities, M&E, and reporting.
(ii) The Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) will coordinate and facilitate regional-level activities and provide capacity building support to the ACE Impact centers
(iii) Project implementation support and supervision at the national level will be undertaken by the National Steering Committee (NSC).
(iv) The ACE Impact project will operate under the overall guidance and oversight of the Project Steering Committee (PSC)whose main task is to set implementation guidelines, review results and progress, oversee the RFU and to ensure the achievement of the project objectives. The PSC will be comprised of two levels: Ministerial and government representative.

II. Objectives of the National Steering Committee (NSC)
Role:

3. The role of the NSC is to oversee, guide and provide implementation support for the project at the national level. The NSC will also be responsible for advocating for national level collaboration in higher education, and act as a liaison between the project, other relevant line/sectoral ministries and industry partners as well as with the public at large.

4. The NSC will meet in-person twice a year for national level review meetings of the project.

Scope and deliverables

5. The specific tasks of the NSC will include the following:
(i) Undertaking annual performance and progress reviews for the selected centers in the country and national facilitation agency (in the case of Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso and Nigeria)
- Reviewing of the implementation plans, annual workplans, annual budgets, Interim Unaudited Financial Reports (IFRs), results (achievements of Disbursement-Linked Results (DLRs) and fund utilization and
- Monitoring of overall progress of the project with a special focus on delays, problems and bottlenecks (approval of progress reports, decisions on follow-up activities presented by the selected centers).
- Overseeing annual fiduciary (procurement and financial) audits of the centers and national facilitation agencies (Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso and Nigeria). This includes being informed about the terms of reference for the annual audits, and oversee follow-up on recommendations in the annual audit reports presented by the selected centers, especially in cases where the individual university audit oversight mechanisms are not adequately functional;
- Reviewing the adherence to national procurement and financial management guidelines for each center(s);
(ii) Discussing at NSC meetings the alignment of ACE Impact with national strategies and support the center(s) to foster linkages with relevant governmental bodies, line ministries and other sectoral partners
(iii) Recommending changes to center-specific Implementation Plan(s) and
(iv) Making key project related recommendations to the respective Ministry in charge of higher education in the country and the PSC

II. Structure of the National Steering Committee (NSC)
Composition
6. Composition of the NSC will include representation from the Ministry and/or agency responsible for higher education, which is expected to be the chair and convener; related line Ministries of the selected centers, Ministry of Finance and the selected centers. The NSC will have approximately five-seven members. This committee will meet semi-annually. Composition and TORs can vary between countries.

Costs associated with NSC Meetings
7. To participate in the NSC meetings, center representatives will pay for their own travel expenses through the project while the government representatives will be government financed. Similarly, the national facilitation agencies (in Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso and Nigeria) will pay for their own travel expenses through their own funds under Sub-component 3.2 The RFU, if attending such meetings, will cover its costs out of Sub-component 3.1. Minor logistical and review expenses for the preparation and facilitation of meetings of the NSC will be financed and managed by the centers. Such expenditures should be clearly identified. However, where there is no national facilitation agency supported through the projects, a request could be made to the Project Manager at the RFU for minor expenses. Capacity-building of NSC members can also be undertaken via the RFU (hosted at AAU).


ANNEX 1.B: TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR ACE IMPACT STEERING COMMITTEE (SC)

Introduction

I. Background Information
Project objectives and scope. The World Bank is scaling up the Africa Centers of Excellence in West and Central Africa. The development objective of the new phase, the Africa Higher Education Centers of Excellence for Development Impact (ACE Impact) is to improve the quality, quantity and development impact of postgraduate education in selected universities through regional specialization and collaboration. The higher order objective of this third phase is to meet the demand for skills required for Africa's development, across various priority sectors. Further, ACE Impact will contribute to the strengthening of the best African universities within the STEM, health, Agriculture, Environment, Applied Social Sciences and associated disciplines. Each of the selected centers will focus on a particular development challenge, and over a five-year period will develop a sustainable portfolio of: postgraduate degree (master’s and Ph.D.) programs; strategic applied research; industry and academic partnerships within and outside the region; and short-term training courses for mid-career professionals. Beyond the center-level support, ACE Impact also aims to influence institutional impact of the universities hosting the centers. Host universities are given an opportunity to achieve specific institutional level results aligned with both the vision of the universities and the objective of ACE Impact. Select colleges of engineering will be given support (beyond the centers) to strengthen their programs. ACE Impact is expected to cover 12 countries across Western and Central Africa, with the majority being those countries covered under ACE I and new countries such as Djibouti, Niger and Guinea.

Project institutional and implementation arrangements. The Project will be implemented by the selected centers, with project facilitation and coordination support from the Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU). Participating governments and the ECOWAS will steer the project through their representatives on the ACE Impact Project Steering Committee. The role of the key stakeholders are as follows:
(i) Each ACE Impact Center, with support from their respective host universities, will principally be responsible for implementing the activities under the project. The individual center is responsible for its strategic planning, proposal preparation and implementation, fiduciary activities, M&E, and reporting.
(ii) The Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) will coordinate and facilitate regional-level activities and provide capacity building support to the ACE Impact centers
(iii) Project implementation support and supervision at the national level will be undertaken by the National Steering Committee.
(iv) The ACE Impact project will operate under the overall guidance and oversight of the Project Steering Committee (PSC)whose main task is to set implementation guidelines, review results and progress, oversee the RFU and to ensure the achievement of the project objectives. The PSC will be comprised of two levels: Ministerial and government representative.

II. Objectives of the Project Steering Committee (PSC)

Role
The role of the PSC is to oversee and guide the project. The PSC will also be responsible for advocating for regional collaboration in higher education, and act as a liaison between the project and regional leadership as well as with the public at large. The RFU will support the PSC by serving as its secretariat.

The PSC will meet in-person once a year at the Ministerial level and twice a year at the representative level. Virtual meetings at the representative level will also be held on an as needed basis. Further details on the structure of the PSC are provided in section III of the terms of reference.

Scope and deliverables
Unless otherwise stated, the key tasks of the PSC listed below will be conducted by the representative level. These key tasks are:
(i) Make strategic decisions to ensure the continued coherence between the program support and sector and regional development priorities. (by Ministerial level PSC);
(ii) Facilitate national (includes ensuring the functioning of the National Steering Committee (NSC) for their specific country), regional, and international networking and outreach activities for the project as a whole;
(iii) Oversee implementation of the decisions of the Ministerial-level PSC, keep the Ministerial-level updated on key outcomes of the representative-level PSC and NSC meetings and regularly update their respective Ministers on national level progress and challenges of the project,
(iv) Sign-off on the call for proposals, process of project evaluation and other aspects of the project design;
(v) Consider the findings and recommendations of the independent evaluation committee (as facilitated by the RFU) in making the final selection of the ACE centers and validation of the emerging centers, while ensuring thematic, geographic, linguistic and gender balance. (by the Ministerial level PSC);
(vi) Make decisions concerning deviations from the project support documents (including the Project Appraisal Document -PAD and the Project Operational Manual -POM);
(vii) Review and guide the overall progress of the project including (a) a special focus on the delays, non- performance of centers, and any other problems and bottlenecks that may inhibit the achievement of the ACE Impact objective; and (b) the review of progress and approval of workplan, budget, financial reports and decisions on follow-up activities presented by the RFU;
(viii)Oversee the implementation of cross-cutting issues (e.g. gender and diversity) as identified in the project documents and provide implementation support during visits to the participating institutions on these issues;
(ix) Review the extent and performance of ACE Impact partnerships (both academic and sectoral collaborations); and
(x) Oversee audits (approval of the annual audit, overseeing follow-up on recommendations in the annual audit report presented by RFU).

III. Structure of the Project Steering Committee (PSC)

Composition
Composition of the PSC will have representation of each country participating in the project. The PSC is constituted by the project’s stakeholders in consultation with the World Bank as part of project preparation.

The Ministerial-level will consist of Ministers in charge of higher education in the countries participating in the project and ECOWAS. The representative-level will include the following members:
(i) Representation of government/Ministry of Higher Education of each participating country (11 representatives).
(ii) Representation by academic experts of international stature representing the disciplines covered under this program (2 academicians).
(iii) Representatives from the private sector (1 private sector representative).
(iv) Representatives of the centers (1 Vice chancellor representing the selected centers).
(v) Representative from ECOWAS (1).
(vi) Representative from UEMOA (1).
1.
The Ministry in charge of higher education may also assign an ACE Impact focal point who will be a country representative supporting the representative-level PSC member.

Meeting Procedures and Related Costs
The procedures of the PSC meetings will be determined by the Committee itself. Similar to the process followed under the ACE I project, each meeting will be chaired by a Chair Person who will be either the Minister or the representative (depending on the level of the meeting) on the PSC from the country hosting the meeting.

The PSC makes decisions on a majority basis. Decisions are subject to the agreed project objective, Project Operations Manual (POM) and Financial Agreements as agreed between the governments World Bank, the French Development Agency (AFD) and AAU. The PSC will be able to co-opt externally for advice as it sees fit (e.g. soliciting insights from subject matter experts providing implementation support to the ACEs).

The PSC will have an appropriate budget under Component 3 to perform its functions. Members of the Committee will all have reasonable travel expenditures covered and per diem but will not receive honorarium.

IV. Required Qualifications For PSC Members

The Project Steering Committee country representative will be selected according to the following criteria: A member of the Ministry and/or national agency in charge of higher education in their country and must
• Be appointed by the Minister or National Agency in charge of higher education.
• Has a strong understanding of higher education in their own country as well as a well-formed overview of the state of higher education in the region.
• Has the ability and status to liaise with the Ministry of Finance within their respective country on issues concerning the project (at the national level).
• Has some experience in managing donor funds. • Has good networks and strong working relationships with higher education institutions.
Has strong relevant experience with project implementation and coordination.
• Is responsive, pro-active in problem solving and has strong communication skills.

Annex 1b - Table 1: Members of ACE Impact Steering Committee and Focal Points

Name Title and Sector Country/ Organization Email Contact 1 Prof. Aboubakar Marcos Deputy Centre Leader, CEA-SMA Abomey-Calavi Universty Benin abmarcos@imsp-uac.org 2 Prof. Ramané Kaboré Director of Quality Assurance for Higher Education Burkina Faso ramaneka@hotmail.com 3 Prof. Fulgence Nindjin Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research Cote d’Ivoire nindjinaka_fulgence@hotmail.com 4 Dr. Fahmi Ahmed Ministry of Higher Education Djibouti fahmi_gamal@yahoo.fr 5 Prof. Leopoldo Amado Commissioner in charge of Education, Science and Culture ECOWAS leopoldo.amado@gmail.com 6 Prof. Salifu Mohammed Executive Secretary of NCTE Ghana salifum@ncte.edu.gh 7 Prof. Mamadou Saliou Diallo Professeur titulaire des Universités Directeur Général Institut Supérieur de Formation à Distance (ISFAD) Guinea diallobala@yahoo.fr; msbala.diallo@isfad-gn.org 8 Mr. Secka Modak Permananet Secretary The Gambia msecka40@hotmail.com 9 Prof. Habibou Abarchi Niger abarchy1@yahoo.fr 10 Prof. Abubakar Rasheed Executive Secretary of NUC Nigeria rasheed3h@gmail.com 11 Prof. Coumba Kane Head of molecular biology laboratory of Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar, Dakar (UCAD) Senegal coumba.toure@ucad.edu.sn 12 Prof. Kouami Kokou Professor Faculty of Sciences/ University of Lomé Togo kokoukouami@hotmail.com 13 Dr Didier Acouetey PSC, Industry France Dacouetey@africsearch.com 14 Dr. Emmanuel Barry PSC -UEMOA Burkina Faso Ebarry@uemoa.int

ANNEX 2: REGIONAL FACILITATION UNIT-TERMS OF REFERENCE

I. Introduction
Background Information
1. Following the successful implementation of the ACE I Project, World Bank is scaling up and increasing the impact of ACEs on achieving key outcomes that are fundamental to economic growth through the ACE for Development Impact Project, or simply, ACE Impact Project.

2. The development objective of the ACE Impact is to improve the quality, quantity and development impact of postgraduate education in selected universities through regional specialization and collaboration. The project will contribute to participating Governments’ objectives of reducing the higher-level skills gaps and improving applied research and technology uptake in the priority sectors. Further, the project would contribute to the strengthening of the best African universities within Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM); Agricultural Sciences; and Health Sciences, as well as in Applied Social Sciences and Environment.

3. The ACE Impact Project covers 12 countries (Republic of Benin, Burkina Faso, Republic of Cote d’Ivoire, Republic of Djibouti, Republic of Ghana, Republic of Guinea, Republic of Niger, Federal Republic of Nigeria, Republic of Senegal, Republic of The Gambia, and Republic of Togo).

4. The AAU is the Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) for the project. The responsibilities of the RFU include the coordination and facilitation of regional activities, monitoring and evaluation, capacity building for the selected centers of excellence and sharing of good practices across the countries.

Institutional and implementation arrangements
5. The Project will be implemented by the selected ACEs, with project facilitation and coordination support from the Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) and technical assistance from selected consultants as necessary. The individual ACE is responsible for strategic planning and implementation of their institutional proposal, monitoring, evaluation and reporting. The ACE will also be responsible for all fiduciary aspects required under World Bank and/or AFD guidelines for financial management, procurement and environment and social safeguards. The project will operate under the overall guidance and oversight of a Project Steering Committee (PSC) whose main task is to set implementation guidelines, review results and progress, oversee the RFU and assist ACEs to ensure the achievement of the project objectives.

6. Project implementation support and supervision at the national level would be undertaken by the National Project Performance Review Committee. The fiduciary capacity available within higher education or related project would provide implementation support and possibly oversight for the ACE. Further, the ACE project would to the extent feasible, use the same fiduciary procedures as in the closely related project.

Objectives
7. Given the regional nature of the project, the project requires an RFU to coordinate and facilitate regional activities to the ACE, partner institutions and be responsible for implementing regional activities for non-ACE countries participating in the project. The RFU will not implement or compete with the ACEs in implementation of the project, rather the RFU will work in close collaboration with the ACEs to ensure smooth operation of the project and will support the implementation of project through:
(i) facilitate the selection of the ACEs and other project preparation activities.
(ii) ensure effective and efficient coordination and facilitation of regional project activities.
(iii) Efficient communications with all project stakeholders, including participating countries, the World Bank and AFD.
(iv) support the monitoring and evaluation needs of the selected ACEs as well as aggregated M&E needs of the overall project.
(v) support to the Project Steering Committee in delivering its tasks.

II. Scope of work
8. Specifically the RFU’s role will be to support the project through:

9. Preparation Phase: during this phase the RFU will
(i) Coordinate and facilitate the selection and evaluation process of the ACEs.
(ii) Support preparation of MoUs for ACEs with partner institutions.
(iii) Undertake baseline study for project results framework.
(iv) Support the set-up of the project steering committee.

10. Implement component 3 of the project, namely regional project coordination, monitoring and evaluation and tertiary education support to partner institutions. Tasks include:
(i) support the capacity building, knowledge sharing and coordination between the ACEs and partner institutions through joint lessons learning and capacity building events.
(ii) serve as the facilitation secretariat between the different project stakeholders including supporting the coordination between the ACEs with concerned Ministries/ Departments of national Governments, the World Bank and AFD.
(iii) be responsible for overseeing implementation of cross-cutting intervention tasks such as policy studies for regional mobility and other relevant tertiary education issues.
(iv) organizing two annual supervision missions.
(v) prior to the supervision missions, semi-annual reports on Project implementation will be prepared by the ACEs with the support of the Facilitation Secretariat.
(vi) coordinate and fund the activities of the Project Steering Committee, including facilitating the bi-annual PSC meetings.
(vii) support the provision of technical assistance to ACEs in thematic and other tertiary education areas as requested.

11. Provide Monitoring and Evaluation support to the ACEs in particular:
(i) overall data collection for monitoring and evaluation.
(ii) support in M&E activities including report updating.
(iii) aggregating reports from all the ACEs into one.
(iv) guide the operations of Monitoring and Evaluation Specialists in ACEs and Partner institutions through providing advice and operating as a support role for issues (problems and solutions) raised by ACEs and partner institutions.
(v) support the development of procedures for regular monitoring of performance of project institutions,
(vi) conduct/commission impact evaluation of training programmes and various types of other studies and disseminate the findings.
(vii) publish on its website results of all national level selections, findings from monitoring and evaluation studies and such other information as required under Disclosure Management Framework.

III. Staffing
12. The Secretariat will have a team that is selected to assist in the tasks outlined above. The team is expected to include a Project Manager dealing with the Project, and adequate key and support staff including a finance officer, procurement officer, and monitoring and evaluation officer.

IV. Required qualification
13. The RFU is selected as a regional organization (identified as part of project preparation) which is involved in capacity building in Africa and one that has credibility within the higher education community. The RFU is a body that has a regional reach, cuts across the disciplines, is not a beneficiary itself and has extensive capacity building and higher education experience. The RFU has been selected from among regional organizations involved in capacity building in Africa according to the following criteria:
(i) experience in managing donor funds.
(ii) long term mandate in higher education.
(iii) established working relationships with higher education institutions.
(iv) evidence of experience in working across sectors.
(v) evidence (based on due diligence assessment) of well established fiduciary capacity or a credible plan to build such a capacity (procurement, FM, environment).
(vi) evidence of regional coverage across thematic areas.
(vii) ability to work in French and English.
(viii) Experience with project implementation and coordination.

ANNEX 3: ACE IMPACT COUNTRY FOCAL POINT - TERMS OF REFERENCE

Terms of Reference of ACE Impact Country Focal Point

Role of the ACE Impact Project Focal Point
As part of project preparation and implementation, a government focal point was appointed to lead the ACE Impact project interests at the national level. This focal point is responsible for communicating with the World Bank, ACEs and all other national stakeholders to advance the project implementation and ensure alignment with national priorities within higher education.

The specific tasks of the ACE focal point include:
• Support to coordination of the annual performance and progress reviews for the selected ACEs.
• Support the ACEs to present the approved annual work plans for the coming year including budget plans, and procurement plans for each ACE to the national steering committee.
• Support the ACEs to submit the approved DLI results and related withdrawals applications.
• Ensure linkages within the ACEs to national strategies.
• Undertake monitoring of overall progress of the project with a special focus on delays, problems and bottlenecks (approval of progress and financial reports, decisions on follow-up activities presented by the selected ACEs).
• Work closely with the centre leaders to help solve bottlenecks.
• Work closely with ministry of higher education and ministry of finance to ensure smooth running and implementation of the project.
• Coordinate regular national review meetings to undertake performance and support to the 3 ACEs.
• In cases where the focal point is not the ACE steering committee member, work closely with the ACE steering committee member of that country to support the implementation of the project.

Qualification and Experience
The national ACE Impact focal point will have the following qualifications:
• The ACE Impact focal point will be a member of the Ministry of Higher Education and/or national agency in charge of higher education
• The ACE Impact focal point will have some experience in managing donor funds;
• Has good networks and strong working relationships with higher education institutions;
• Has strong relevant experience with project implementation and coordination.

ANNEX 4: ACE IMPACT SUBJECT MATTER EXPERTS - TERMS OF REFERENCE AND SUPERVISION MISSION

Africa Centers of Excellence for Development Impact (ACE Impact)

Terms of Reference for Experts

Introduction

The Africa Centers of Excellence for Development Impact (ACE Impact) project is a regional higher education project with 11 participating countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The anticipated budget, with funding from the World Bank and Agence Française de Développement (AFD), is approximately $350 million over five years. The project will support 43 Centers of Excellence, 5 Emerging Centers, and 4 Colleges of Engineering focused on postgraduate education, applied research and addressing development challenges.

Role of Experts

The ACE Impact Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) is tasked with identifying and coordinating a team of subject matter Experts who contribute to the operational and technical implementation support and supervision of the ACE Impact Centers. These independent Experts are selected based upon their academic and/or disciplinary expertise relative to the ACE Impact Centers, and their international experience in higher education and/or university leadership. Experts are expected to support specific Centers and to contribute to the ACE Impact project as a whole.

The core qualifications for the ACE Impact Experts are:

· Experience in teaching and/or management of higher education programs
· Experience in working closely with industry and sector for the delivery of education and research programs they teach
· Subject matter experts in one or more disciplines associated with Development Challenges and the ACE Impact Center portfolio
· Capable of evaluating and supervising postgraduate education programs, and applied research activities
· Expertise in the management of university research centers
· Expertise in the global academic system
· Strong communication skills and ability to work well in a team
· As a team, the Experts are expected to be diverse in terms of subject matter expertise, geographic location and gender.

Each ACE Impact Center has been assigned a primary Expert who will provide implementation support and supervision to the Center. As required, additional Experts may be utilized to support a Center based upon a demonstrated need. Experts are expected to support and guide the ACE Impact Centers so that they attain scientific excellence, quality, relevance and impact. Each Expert will provide his/her inputs in close coordination and guidance from the ACE Impact Project Manager and the World Bank Task Team Leaders (including both the Regional TTLs and the Country Co-TTLs).

Experts assigned to each Center are expected to:

· Be fully familiar with the ACE Impact project, including being well versed in the ACE Impact Operations Manual, Proposal and Implementation Plan of the select ACE they are supposed to support
· Understand the Center and its goals
· Engage with the Center leadership, university leadership, and Focal Point/Ministry in support of the ACE Impact project
· Provide implementation support and supervision, and provide guidance, advice to the Center and to the host institution, and
· Provide support to the Center to ensure that DLIs are achieved in a timely fashion and project expenditures are managed to support the project implementation.

Key Tasks of Subject Matter Experts
The key tasks of the subject matter experts include:
· Review, and provide expert insight and advice on, the ACE Impact Center Implementation Plan. Make recommendations on their quality, relevance and potential in addressing development challenges.
· Review, and provide expert insight and advice on, the ACE Impact Center annual Work Plans. Make recommendations on their quality, relevance and potential in addressing regional challenges.
· Mentoring the ACE Impact Centers as appropriate.
· Undertake supervision and implementation support visits (these may be either in-person or remote/virtual) to the ACE Impact Centers. Report on the support visits to the Regional Facilitation Unit in a timely fashion.
· As agreed with the RFU, the World Bank and the ACE Impact Centers, participate in remote support meetings for Centers.
· Review the research publications of the ACE Impact Centers to ensure compliance with ACE Impact objectives.
· Support the ACE Impact Centers by, when appropriate, connecting them to potential university and industry partners, and potential funding opportunities.
· Report supervision findings to the Project Steering Committee during its Meetings.
· Participate in the ACE Impact Regional Workshops. Contribute to the development of the Agenda, participate in plenary sessions as required, and lead thematic and topical breakout groups as appropriate. Submit a report on the breakout sessions they lead highlighting Center progress and critical challenges.
· Liaise with the RFU on any key factors that may hinder the success of Centers or the ACE Impact project.
· Provide ongoing advice and support to the RFU and the World Bank on the ACE Impact project.

Deliverables and Outputs
· Supervision Reports following on-site supervision missions to ACEs
· Contributions to Aide Memoires as requested during regional workshop as necessary
· Brief Reports on remote support meetings
· Short report on review of relevance of research publications as requested by the RFU
· Inputs and preparation material for the regional workshop thematic/sector sessions as necessary

Working Arrangement

· The Expert will submit in a timely manner all deliverables and outputs described above to the RFU of the ACE Impact Project
· The Expert will ensure that in all communication to the Center/ACEs, the ACE Impact Project Manager is copied, and that the World Bank regional TTLs and country co-TTL are copied
· The Expert will as necessary participate in virtual Webex/Skype/Teams/Zoom meetings with the ACEs in addition to email communication
· If the Expert is undertaking an on site mission, the expert will coordinate with the ACE Impact Project Manager to ensure the ACE Impact Manager shares a draft agenda to the ACE/center team well in advance of the mission

Selection of the Subject Matter Experts

The subject matter Experts are selected and engaged by the RFU in consultation with the World Bank and AFD

ANNEX 5: COVID-19 PROJECT PARAMETERS UPDATES

I. Updates to DLR 3 (students) verification process – Regionality flexibility rules

1. Students earned with Regional flexibility: Regionality Rule is waived for students submitted up to year 2 maximum in DLI table.
1.1 National students are automatically paid up to the maximum number of students allocated for year 2 in each center DLI table without applying the regional rules.
1.2 Regional students are all paid in addition to the Nationals - flexibility noting that even though they are paid for they have not yet been applied to national students and can be used for extra national students in 2020 or for future verification.
1.3 The first set total of students earned by the centers equals to the sum of Nationals - flexibility and Regionals – flexibility.

2. Students earned without Regionality flexibility (Regular project rule): Regionality rule (1 regional for 4 national) is applied for extra national students beyond year 2 maximum
2.1 For any additional national students submitted by the centers beyond year 2 maximum, the regionality rule is applied back using “Regionals – flexibility” students.
2.2 If the number of “Regionals – flexibility” students does not cover for all extra natoinal, center will be paid for only the national students covered by regionals and the unpaid nationals could be paid using extra regional students from future verification.

3. Total Payment for students (Flexibility + Extra) equals National and Regional Students earned with Regional flexibility plus extra nationals earned with regionality rule
3.1 Total students earned by each center will equal the sum of Total Students earned – flexibility and Total Nat.l Students earned – No flexibility.
3.2 Maximum per DLR still holds (ultimate restricting factor) so final earnings to the center will be disbursed up to the DLR maximum ceilings estimated for the students in the DLI table.

4. Extra/Deficit Students for future verification
4.1 Regionals students counted/paid but not used for national students will be saved and used (but not paid) for future verification or for past verification of national students who were not counted due to lack of regionals.
4.2 Nationals students not paid for due to lack of regional students have also been saved and could be paid for during future verification where center might have extra regional students.

II. List of COVID-19 related activities eligible under DLR 5.1 on Revenue generated

Eligible COVID-19 related activities under DLR 5.1 could be classified into the following categories:

1. Sale of COVID-19 related products including Personal protection equipment, hand and general sanitizers, manufactured by the ACE;
2. Income from COVID-19 related Consultancy Services rendered by the ACE both locally and internationally including research services;
3. Rental of facilities for COVID-related activities; and
4. Grants for undertaking COVID-19 related research.


ANNEX 6: ACE IMPACT PARTNERSHIP DOCUMENTATION
ANNEX 6.A: PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT TEMPLATE

1. Identification of Partners
1. This Partnership Agreement (“PA”) is entered into on (insert date) by and between (list all partners engaged with the ACE project):
(Partner 1), a (insert type of organization e.g. public university) based at (insert address)
(Partner 2), a (insert type of organization e.g. public university) based at (insert address)
(Partner 3), a (insert type of organization e.g. sector partner) based at (insert address)
(Partner 4), a (insert type of organization e.g. sector partner) based at (insert address)
2. The parties are herein individually and jointly referred to as the ‘partner’ and the ‘partners’ respectively.
WHEREAS:
1.1 (Partner 1) and (Partner 2) are institutions of higher education, and (Partner 3) is a (e.g. private health clinic) taking an active part in (list overall project activities – e.g. joint research, curriculum development, faculty exchange, student exchange etc.), within the context of the Africa Centres for Excellence project and that project’s objectives, set out in Section 2 below.

1.2 The government of (insert country name) has offered the partners a grant amounting to $(insert amount) to support the project, subject to the terms and conditions detailed in the Performance and Funding Contract (refer to separate document shared with all partners).

1.3 (Partner 1), as the Africa Centre of Excellence for Development Impact (ACE Impact), and lead partner, has accepted this grant on behalf of the partners.

1.4 The partners wish to enter into this Partnership Agreement in order to set out their respective rights and obligations under this arrangement.
3. Context of the Partnership Agreement
3.1. Partnership is a key modality of regional collaboration. The award specifies that at least 15% of project funding must be invested in partnerships, and at least 10% must be invested in partnerships activities with African partners (excluding national partners). The ACE is required to serve as a hub for a network of partner institutions including academic and industry partners.
3.2. The main objectives of the academic partnership are to; raise the quality of research and education in institutions in the region and; to raise the ACE’s own capacity in research and education.

4. Objectives and Scope of the Partnership Agreement
4.1. The strategic objective of this Partnership Agreement is to contribute towards the shared project goal (outlined in section 2.1); to promote regional specialization among participating universities in areas that address regional development challenges and strengthen the capacities of these universities to deliver quality training and applied research.
4.2. At the operational level, this Partnership Agreement seeks to facilitate and to enhance academic cooperation and sharing of resources to deliver the agreed partnership activities towards the achievement of the project objectives.
4.3. This Partnership Agreement is not a legally binding contract, but rather a framework document underpinning a collaborative partnership between the respective institutions.
5. Governance, roles and responsibilities.
5.1. By virtue of the inter-institutional nature of this partnership, the partners’ senior management teams shall commit themselves to the principles and approaches embodied in this Partnership Agreement, as well as its requirements and implications, to enable well-informed and supportive decision-making that facilitates its implementation.
5.2. For purposes of expediting the effective coordination and implementation of the activities covered by this Partnership Agreement, the partners shall nominate authorized representatives. The lead project contacts will participate in the project management group established by the ACE, to oversee the implementation of this Partnership Agreement.
5.3. As the ACE is the lead partner in this agreement, the ACE will take responsibility for:
(a) Convening regular meetings (insert frequency) of the partners and circulating the relevant documentation in advance of the meeting. Meetings will normally take place using ICT, to be cost-efficient, except when a physical meeting is necessary.
(b) Financial management on behalf of the partners in accordance with the agreed project guidelines and project budget (Annex 3).
(c) Oversight of the implementation of the Partnership Action Plan (Annex 1).
(d) Compiling the annual project report with input from all partners, including reporting against agreed indicators, activity reporting, financial and qualitative reporting.
(e) Discussing and resolving any issues with the partners as they arise.
5.4. (Insert name of Partners 2, 3, 4, etc. If their responsibilities differ, insert additional sections) will take responsibility for:
(a) Participating in regular meetings of the partners.
(b) Complying with the agreed budget for partnership activities.
(c) Deliverables as outlined in the Partnership Action Plan (Annex 2).
(d) Contribution to the annual report, and review and sign off on the annual report.
(e) Discussing and resolving any issues with the partners as they arise.

6. Financial Management
6.1. The ACE is responsible for project financial management, including budgeting, expenditure and accounting. This includes specific responsibility for ensuring that 15% of project funding is spent on partnership activities as agreed in the Partnership Action Plan and project budget. The ACE is required to solicit concurrence from all partners for the expenditures.
6.2. Each partner is responsible for deliverables in accordance with the agreed Partnership Action Plan (Annex 1) and the project budget.

7. Monitoring and Evaluation
7.1. The partners shall inform one another about progress made, and challenges, in respect of each joint activity at regular meetings of the partners.
7.2. ACEs will be funded based on achievement of results that are annually reported (DLIs). The Partnership Action Plan captures partnership deliverables that will contribute towards those results. Partners agree to work together towards these results and or results relating to the attainment of DLIs.
7.3. The ACE will compile an annual report which will include reporting against indicators, activity reporting, financial and qualitative reporting. Each partner will provide the ACE with inputs for this report on request, following sufficient notice of requirements. The annual reports must be endorsed and signed off by all partners and the final version published and circulated to all partners.
7.4. Each year the partners shall review the operation of this Partnership Agreement and revise the specific collaborative activities and commitments for the upcoming year in line with the outcomes of the review.
7.5. The partners agree on the following additional monitoring procedures which will contribute to the review and development of the partnership:
(i) Insert details here as needed
(ii) Insert details here as needed
8. Intellectual Property
8.1. Ownership of any intellectual property (including but not limited to confidential information, know-how, patents, copyrights, design rights, rights relating to computer software, and any other industrial or intellectual property rights) developed or created by the students and faculty as a result of joint research or education activity during the course of this project shall be vested in both partners to this agreement. Partners shall have the joint right to determine the commercial exploitation and disposition of such intellectual property, and partners shall enter in good faith discussions in order to make joint applications for the registration of the same. Before any registration or commercialization of any intellectual property takes place, the partners agree to reach a separate agreement covering issues such as exploitation rights and revenue sharing. Any publication regarding such intellectual property shall only be possible with the prior written consent of all partners, with the understanding that such consent should not be unreasonably withheld.

  9. Confidentiality
9.1. All confidential information disclosed in writing and clearly marked “Confidential” by one partner to the others relating to this Partnership Agreement shall be kept confidential, and the partners shall under no circumstances disclose this information to any third party without prior written consent of all partners except when the provisions of law make allowance.

10. Liability
10.1. Each partner undertakes to perform its part of the project at its own risk and under its own sole liabilities.

11. Initiation and Termination of the Partnership Agreement.
11.1. This Partnership Agreement will come into force on the date that it is fully signed by all partners and shall remain in force for the duration of the ACE Impact project, from (insert project dates here) unless terminated by any partner.
11.2. Any partner may terminate the Partnership Agreement at any time by giving prior written notice of three months first to the other partners, then to the Association of African Universities as the Regional Facilitation Unit, although such action will only be taken after consultation with all partners, in order to avoid possible inconvenience to all concerned.
11.3. The partners agree that proposed changes to the Partnership Agreement’s contents or validity must be communicated in writing by the proposing partner to the other partners. Any variation to the Partnership Agreement must then be agreed in writing by all partners.
12. Disputes
12.1. The partners will make every reasonable effort to resolve all issues fairly by negotiation. In the event that the dispute cannot be resolved within a four week period the matter shall be referred to the Presidents or other leaders of the partner organisations involved, for resolution. Any dispute which cannot be settled amicably shall be finally settled by third party mediation. Each partner shall bear its own costs connected to such a mediation procedure.

ANNEX 6.B: PARTNERSHIP ACTION PLAN

Description of the main partnership activities.
Guidelines: Describe the nature of the key activities that partners will undertake together. For example, joint research, faculty exchange and training, student exchange, curriculum development, research publications, policy briefs, share facilities/equipment,

Implementation plan
Guidelines: Use this template to outline the main partnership activities, deliverables and milestones. Provide additional notes on specific responsibilities, below the table, as needed.

Deliverable Activities and Milestones Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Responsibility Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Develop and deliver joint curriculum in petroleum engineering laboratory methods Lab and equipment procurement Faculty training workshops Offer new curriculum to 25 MSc students Student visits to ACE Offer curriculum to 50 MSc students Student visits X X X X X X X ACE ACE Partner 2 ACE Partner 2 ACE Complete Authorized Representatives Partner 1 (Insert Name) Partner 2 (Insert Name) Partner 3 (Insert Name)… Lead project contact Name: Address: Email: Phone: Name: Address: Email: Phone: Financial contact Name: Address: Email: Phone: Name: Address: Email: Phone: Administrative contact Name: Address: Email: Phone: Name: Address: Email: Phone: Other contact (s) Name: Address: Email: Phone: Name: Address: Email: Phone: ANNEX 6.C: PARTNERSHIP BUDGET Guidelines: Use this template to outline the costs of the partnership activities. As outlined previously, the ACE is responsible for expenditure, according to this budget, on behalf of the partners. Activity Item Cost Total Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Example: Activity 1: Joint curriculum in petroleum engineering Item 1.1: Lab equipment installation $50,000 $50,000 Item 1.2: Lab equipment maintenance $5,000 $5,000 $5,000 $15,000 Item 2…. Activity 1 subtotal $ Activity 2…. Item 2.1 Item 2.2… Total value of partnership budget in US dollars $65,000


  ANNEX 6.D: RESULTS FRAMEWORK AND MONITORING (NOTE THIS IS A SUB-COMPONENT OF THE OVERALL PROJECT RESULTS FRAMEWORK)

Guidelines:
Use this template to describe what success will look like in relation to the partnership activities. Include specific targets for Years 1-4 and agreed responsibilities in relation to data collection and sharing.

Indicators: Unit of measure Baseline Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Frequency Of measurement Data Source Responsibility for Data Collection Objective 1: Improve capacity of ACE and institution 2 for research and education in petroleum engineering Example: Number of students completing joint MSc module in lab methods for petroleum engineering Students completing MSc module 0 25 50 75 100 Annual University student records Each institution will collect ACE will compile information Objective 2…. The partners have signed this Partnership Agreement which will come into force on the date outlined in Section 1. Signature Page:

Signed on behalf of (Partner 1) by: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬ ______________________

Printed Name: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬______________________

Position: President/Vice-Chancellor/CEO Date: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬ ______________________

Signed on behalf of (Partner 2) by: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬______________________

Printed Name: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬______________________ Position: President/Vice-Chancellor/CEO

Date: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬ ______________________

Signed on behalf of (Partner 3) by: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬______________________ Printed Name: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬______________________ Position: President/Vice-Chancellor/CEO Date: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬ ______________________


  ANNEX 6.E: GUIDELINES FOR ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIPS

1. Background

 The objective of the ACE Impact project is to meet the labor market demands for skills within specific areas, where there are skill shortages affecting development, economic growth and poverty reduction. The project will promote regional specialization among participating universities in areas that address regional challenges and strengthen the capacities of these universities to deliver quality training and applied research. Partnership will be a key modality of regional collaboration. At least 15% of project funding must be invested in partnerships, and at least 10% must be invested in partnership activities with African partners (excluding national partners). Each ACE will be required to serve as a hub for a network of partner institutions. Partnerships can be developed with academic institutions, including research institutions, and industry partners, including both private sector partners and community institutions (e.g. health clinics). These guidelines refer to partnerships between academic institutions specifically. Academic partnerships will be at the national, regional (West and Central Africa) and global level (outside Africa).
 Academic partnerships can build research capacity and be a means to develop sustainable research systems (local, national or global) with the overall goal of having research findings contribute more directly and powerfully to development. The specific objectives of academic partnerships within the ACE project are to: (i) increase the capacity of partner institutions in the region to deliver quality education and conduct research, preferably including institutions in fragile countries.; (ii) raise the Centres’ educational and research capacity through drawing upon partnership with internationally leading institutions within the same domain, and (iii) build upon the strengths of national and regional institutions (e.g. sharing of unique physical and faculty resources) to create synergies and thereby raise the quality of education and research The ACEs will partner with academic institutions that have, or need, capacity within the particular development challenge they are addressing. This includes similar international academic Centres globally, universities in the region, and national and regional research institutions. In particular, collaboration with regional research institutions is critical within agriculture and health where substantial academic capacity is located outside universities in sector-specific research institutions. The partnership activities may include joint delivery of education programs, professional courses for regional faculty, faculty exchanges/visiting faculty, joint research, joint conferences, sharing of specialized equipment and library resources. Partnership activities should address regional development challenges, and the collaboration should benefit each partner institution in clearly defined terms. The ACE project partnerships can include existing and new partnerships.

2. Objectives of the Partnership Guidelines

• To learn from academic institutions that have identified partnership success factors and challenges.
• To provide practical guidance to ACEs in establishing/implementing successful partnerships.
• Note that guidelines are not mandatory, unless explicitly stated, in which case this is also stated in the Call for Proposals.

3. Partnership Principles

 Partnership is a cooperative strategy between two or more organizations or individuals favoring cooperation above substitution, subordination or competition . An effective educational partnership is a dynamic collaborative process between educational institutions that brings mutual, though not necessarily symmetrical, benefits to both parties. Partners share ownership of the project. Their relationship is based on respect, trust, transparency and reciprocity as well as a good understanding of each other’s cultural and working environment. Decisions are taken jointly after real negotiations between the partners. Each partner is open and clear about what they are bringing to the partnership and their expectations. The following principles and guidelines can inform the establishment and development of ACE partnerships.

Table 1: 10 Principles and Actions for Successful Educational Partnership

1st Principle: Shared Ownership of Partnership
• Clarify and communicate partnership aims and expectations.
• Ensure that partners jointly participate in the decision-making process and management of the partnership.
• Articulate the benefits of the partnership for each partner. These need not be exactly symmetrical.
2nd Principle: Trust and Transparency amongst Partners
• Partners should be particularly open and transparent when discussing objectives, motivations, managerial issues, ownership of research outputs, access to resources, and budgets.
• Transparency should translate into specific acts such as documentation, record keeping, communicating openly.
• Opportunities to meet face-to-face can help to build trust. Trust and mutual respect can take time to develop.
3rd Principle: Understanding each Partner’s Cultural and Working Environment.
• Evaluate the impact of the larger environment on the proposed partnership
• Develop and share a baseline of capacity for each partner institution in the areas relevant to delivering proposed partnership activities. Identify strengths, weaknesses and concerns
• Ensure that working procedures and structures are appropriate to the environment.
4th Principle: Clear Division of Roles and Responsibilities
• The roles and responsibilities of each partner and the individuals involved should be clearly identified, examined and agreed upon.
• The roles and responsibilities of the partners and each individual should be based on their capabilities and skills, current and anticipated. Training needs should be identified.
• Each institution should be clear and open on what they have to offer. Consider what structures are needed to manage the partnership. How will responsibilities be divided? How will people be chosen to take responsibility?
5th Principle: Effective and Regular Communication
• Develop a plan for both internal (project staff) and external (other stakeholders) communications.
• Challenges and problems should be discussed as soon as they arise. Results and successes should be celebrated and communicated.
• Some specific steps to be taken include:
o Identify a key project contact person in each institution
o Agree on the best and most practical modes of communication
o Set regular meetings
o Make use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) where possible
• Ensure a budget for face-to-face meetings to increase understanding of partner contexts and build trust.
6th Principle: Joint Strategic Planning and Implementation
• Define partnership objectives and activities through a joint planning process.
• Develop a Partnership Action Plan.
• Draft and sign a Partnership Agreement between partners.
• Review partnership objectives on a regular basis.
7th Principle: Strong Commitment from Junior and Senior staff and Management
• Be clear on the commitment of skills and time that is required.
• Communicate with senior management and secure their support for the partnership.
• International partnerships are labor-intensive and take time to develop. Keep the momentum going.
8th Principle: Supportive Institutional Infrastructure
• Assess staff training needs and plan and budget for training and mentoring.
• Assess ICT capabilities, including online learning methods, and develop a realistic communications plan.
• Make use of any established institutional strategy for international partnerships and associated infrastructure.
9th Principle: Monitoring and Evaluation
• Determine indicators of success of the partnership as part of a joint planning process. These should be clear qualitative or quantitative indicators that measure objectives.
• Agree on monitoring procedures, applying indicators of success at regular intervals to inform management.
• Agree on evaluation responsibilities. Use evaluation to disseminate impact of project and maintain support.
10th Principle: Sustainability
• Develop a clear financing plan.
• Be alert to changes in the partnership and potential funding gaps. Review these regularly.

  4. Stages of Partnership

 Successful partnerships tend to change and evolve over time. Any academic partnership will go through a number of stages and phases during its lifecycle. These stages differ according to the type of partnership and the profile of partner institutions involved. Four main stages can be identified as follows: Planning and Consultation, Partnership Agreement, Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation. Guidelines and a checklist of considerations for each of these stages are provided below.

5. Planning and Consultation

 All partnerships will be grounded in the objectives of the ACE Impact to build regional collaboration in research and education to address a specific development challenge. The ACE could consider doing an analysis of its own strengths and weaknesses in addressing these objectives which would identify outstanding gaps and needs and help drive the partnership process. Building on this, the next step would be to do an analysis to scan existing and potential partners, then create a profile of desirable partners for this project. Next, the ACE could create a short-list of potential partners to approach, and a set of partnership selection criteria. Once potential partners have been identified a consultation process can begin either face-to-face or by phone or videoconference. Once there is agreement, in principle, to establish a partnership, a more specific, joint, planning process can be carried out which starts to outline the proposed roles and responsibilities of each partner.

Table 2: Guidelines for Consultation and Planning Processes.

Step 1: Consultation Process – discussion points Step 2: Partnership Action Plan  What are the reasons driving the idea of initiating a partnership?  What are the individual and institutional needs and aims?  Is a partnership the best way of responding to these needs and objectives?  What are the potential benefits to each partner? Who are the beneficiaries?  Does the partnership fit in with any institutional plans or national strategic frameworks?  Will the benefits delivered through the partnership have a long-term impact?  Can the institution make a long-term commitment to the partnership?  Is the institution able to invest the necessary human and financial capacity and resources involved in running a partnership?  Are there enough staff from the organization willing and keen to get involved with the partnership? Are they willing to dedicate time to planning and managing the partnership?  Do the staff feel that the partnership would be beneficial in terms of their own professional development?  Would the senior management of the institution be willing to support the partnership?  Will the institution be able to help monitor and evaluate the outcomes of the work to ensure it is meeting the agreed objectives?  Are there any uncertainties or questions in the future which may jeopardize the partnership?  Decide on a lead contact person for each institution.  Agree on clear strategic objectives for the partnership  Decide on concrete results related to each objective  Describe key partnership activities  Set realistic timescales for each stage of the plan  Agree on project delivery and project management structures  Agree on budget allocated to partnership activities  For the purposes of the Proposal Submission Form, ACEs will be required to provide details of proposed action plans for national, regional and international collaboration and an associated budget for partnership activities. Partnership activities may include education services, joint research, student and faculty exchange and others (further guidelines are provided in the Proposal Submission Form). Since partnerships are a key modality for implementing the activities of the ACE, they could also be referenced in other sections of the Proposal Submission Form, as appropriate. All partnership activities should be included in the budget. The submitting institution will be the prospective ACE and all funds will be managed by this ACE. Letters of support are also required from each proposed partner. These will include information on activities, benefits to each partner, contributions of each partner and the budget. Letters must nominate a main contact person and be signed off by senior management within each institution. A formal Partnership Agreement is not required at the proposal stage. Guidelines are provided, within the Proposal Submission Form, for Letters of Support and Partnership Action Plans. Selected institutions will have the opportunity to revise and update the Partnership Action Plan following the evaluation comments, including consideration of new partners.

6. Partnership Agreement

 When funding has been awarded, a Partnership Agreement will be developed by the ACEs in close collaboration with their partners and co-signed by all major partners. This agreement will form part of the performance and funding contract to be signed with the Government. The Partnership Agreement formalizes the commitments between institutions. A template for this agreement will be provided, although institutions should adapt this to their institutional processes and preferences. Below is an outline of the sample template. The final agreement does not need to include all the details of the partnership, and it may be preferable to avoid excessive detail. Additional detail can be included in the annual Partnership Action Plan. There should also be some flexibility within the agreement to allow adaptation and re-negotiation under changing circumstances, as the partnership develops.

Sample Template: Overview of topics covered within partnership agreement:
1. Identification of parties
2. Context of the Partnership Agreement
3. Objectives and Scope of the Partnership Agreement
4. Governance, Roles and Responsibilities
5. Financial Management
6. Monitoring and Evaluation
7. Intellectual property
8. Confidentiality
9. Liability
10. Initiation and Termination of the Partnership Agreement
11. Disputes
12. Annexes
• Partnership Action Plan
• Authorized Representatives
• Partnership Budget
• Results Framework and Monitoring
13. Signatures

7. Partnership Implementation
 Implementation of partnerships will be guided by the agreed partnership which will be a reference point when there is need for clarification on key inputs, activities and outputs. These will be summarized in the Partnership Action Plan. Selected institutions will revise and update the Partnership Action Plan following evaluation comments, including consideration of new partners. Following the overall planning process, partners will need to develop and agree on the implementation of these plans and outline details. Partnership work should have a clear and manageable focus. The first few months of the partnership are important as they will set the tone for the future of the working relationship and help determine the success of the project.
 As the partnerships are implemented, processes must be clarified. Partners should make use of existing infrastructure within their institutions and will develop additional project infrastructure as needed. Governance structures will be established and all partners should be satisfied that they are appropriately represented within these structures. Communications channels will be clarified, for example acceptable modes of communication, and a schedule of regular meetings should be agreed. A practical system of record-keeping and information sharing will be established. Particularly within the initial months of the project, partners should attempt to be somewhat flexible and open to learning and adapting their processes. Regular reviews of the partnerships should be scheduled (for example this could be a regular item on the agenda of project management meetings), to enable partners to share their feedback and use this to inform the development of the partnerships.
 Staff buy-in and participation at all levels is crucial. To this end, roles and responsibilities must be made clear to all involved. Training needs should be identified and addressed. A range of incentives for staff can be considered, including financial rewards, professional support, peer support, job rotation and partnership visits or exchanges. Staff, at all levels, must have a clear, accessible forum for resolving disputes. There should also be regular communications with senior management and external partners to ensure that they remain supportive of the partnerships.

8. Monitoring and Evaluation
 Monitoring is intended to be an ongoing project management practice. Formal evaluation will take place on an annual basis, led by each ACE, reporting to the Association of African Universities. Annual reports will include reporting against indicators, activity reporting, financial and qualitative reporting. All partners must contribute to the annual reports and these must be endorsed and signed off by each partner before submission to the AAU. ACEs will be funded based on achievement of results that are annually reported. The Partnership Action Plan should capture partnership outputs that will contribute towards those results and will align with the overall Project Results Framework. The main partnership indicators will be the number of faculty and students rotating and providing services in ACE and partner institutions (including those on regional student body, internships and faculty and student outreach activities), as well as the number of regional research publications. Additional partnership indicators may vary depending on the sectors and disciplines that are prioritized by the ACE. After two years there will be a mid-term review at which point the Partnership Action Plan will be revised.
 The tools for monitoring and evaluation of partnerships will be: (a) institutional progress reports; (b) third party verification through external reviewers and performance audit reports, if necessary; and (c) interactions with stakeholders. Partners must agree on their respective responsibilities regarding monitoring and evaluation and capture this in the Partnership Agreement. Activities to be allocated will include; development of a baseline measures, setting up monitoring processes, data collection, taking responsibility for annual evaluation reports.
 For the purposes of monitoring and ongoing project management, ACEs may wish to develop additional, tailored, partnership indicators which will facilitate the process of partnership development. Table 3 below provides a list of questions that partners may wish to consider in monitoring their partnerships.

Table 3: Monitoring Partnerships
Activities and Outputs
Are the agreed partnership activities taking place? If not, what are the barriers and what actions are required?
Are the agreed outputs being delivered by partners? If not, what are the barriers and what actions are required?
Structures and Processes
Are partners participating in governance structures as agreed?
Are the roles and responsibilities of each partner clear?
Is communication between partners easy? How is it facilitated?
Do the partners know each other well and trust each other?
Is there transparency? Do all partners have access to project budget documents, reports and other scientific information?
Are there any current outstanding issues or disputes between partners? What is required to resolve these issues?
Are there any additional staff training needs?
Are all internal and external stakeholders updated and engaged on partnership activities?
Learning and Improvement
What lessons have been learned about partnerships to date?
What improvements could be made to the partnerships?
What are the actions arising from this review?

ANNEX 7: DATA VERIFICATION TERMS OF REFERENCE

THIRD PARTY VERIFICATION OF DISBURSEMENT LINKED INDICATORS (DLIs)

DRAFT

M&E within the ACE Impact Programme:
The ACE Impact Project adopts a programme-for-results approach and therefore has a strong focus on monitoring and evaluation to facilitate the achievement of planned goals. Progress of implementation will be monitored at the level of the individual ACEs and their partner institutions (PIs), and the Regional Facilitating Unit (RFU). The information gathered will inform management decisions, strategic planning and risk management, and demonstrate the results, impact and cost effectiveness of the ACE-Programme. Additionally, the information collected will help determine disbursement of the grant.
To facilitate the process, an overall Results Framework (RF) was developed by the Bank in collaboration with the AAU and other key stakeholders, and with input from government and university representatives in the region. The RF features Individual ACEs, once selected, will develop more specific results frameworks detailing the expected results, indicators and targets specifically tailored to their proposed projects. ACEs will be required to collect and submit data biannually (November 15th and June 1st) to the Association of African Universities (AAU) which will be responsible for coordinating and supporting them in implementing and monitoring their projects. The data once received, compiled and analyzed, will be submitted to the World Bank and AFD (by Dec. 30th and June 30th) to inform project management and grant disbursement decisions.

A. OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this assignment is to conduct an independent verification of progress on disbursement linked indicators (DLIs) before any disbursement can be done for the project under the DLI category of expenditure. This consultancy aims to: (a) design evaluation methodology for verification of the progress made on DLIs by the ACEs; (b) Conduct the verification in a transparent and independent manner such that it provides the robust evidence for decision-makers.

B. DURATION OF THE ASSIGNMENT AND WORK PLAN
1. The assignment will be undertaken over a four-year period between June 1st 2019 and July 31st 2023. The successful firm/organization will need to maintain necessary presence in Accra, Ghana and the programme field in the ACE Impact participating countries. It is expected that the consultancy will have a total duration of about one month per year.

2. The verification activity will commence on xx 2019 or shortly thereafter. By xx 2020 a draft report will be submitted and the final report will be finalized by xx , 2020. These dates are expected to be strictly adhered to. This will be repeated every year until the last DLIs are to be achieved in 2023. The consulting firm/agency may also be required to do an interim evaluation of carryover DLIs as an exception.

3. The Firm/Agency is expected to develop methodology and schedule of the evaluation plan with relevant set of instruments for conducting the study. The work plan shall provide details of how all the various tasks, sub-tasks, and activities will be undertaken; specific timelines for each task; logistic and manpower resources for entire period of the assignment. The proposed work plan should be consistent with the technical approach and methodology, reflecting understanding of the scope of work. During mobilization, and having studied the operational budget and logistics, the Consultant shall produce an updated work plan for review and approval. This revised work plan will form the basis for execution, supervision and progress and shall not be modified or revised by the Consultant without prior approval by AAU and the World Bank.

4. The World Bank/RFU reserves the right to reject the instruments or re-negotiate with the Agency about modifications to the set of instruments or methodology.

5. The assignment will be consulted and coordinated under AAU and the Programme Coordinator will be the key focal person for management coordination.

6. Payment schedule will be agreed upon in advance of contract finalization and will include first release of advance upon contract signing, and lump sums after major deliverable milestones.

C. SCOPE OF WORK/ SPECIFIC TASKS AND METHODOLODY
A third party firm or organization is required to design, conduct, and analyse the baseline and follow-on studies that will evaluate the DLIs. The project has 7 DLIs with 20 associated annual DLI targets. Each DLI target has a specific timeline and achievement level linked to it. The primary task of this exercise will be to carry out transparent and impartial verification of the DLIs under various components of the project.
D. DELIVERABLES AND TIMELINES
The selected firm/agency shall provide the following deliverables during the course of the implementation of the assignment in a timely manner. All deliverables have to be authorized and approved by the WB and RFU (AAU).
1. The list of deliverables includes but is not limited to the following:
a) Methodology of the verification exercise.
b) Survey questionnaires
c) Verification Indicators and checklist
d) Form/Instrument used for validation exercise.
e) Data entry template and coding scheme
f) Detailed activity plan for conducting the verification exercise.
g) Field data collection report; field quality control report
h) Analysis of the findings of the verification exercise.
i) Scanned copies of all completed questionnaires
j) Brief note/report reviewing the methodology and tools used and providing recommendations for future improvements.

2. Report (both qualitative and quantitative) on variations and discrepancies on the DLI activities
3. Identification of impediments (if any) in the timely achievement of the benchmarks and possible remedial measures

E. RESPONSIBILITIES
(i) Additional Responsibilities for the Consultant
General Oversight:
The Consultant shall be responsible for overall management of the services including supervision and management of the study, team training, liaison with AAU and other parties, and ensuring quality control of services. As part of project management, there will be biweekly progress meetings (physical or via internet) between the WB, AFD, AAU and the Consultant. The Consultant shall produce minutes of the proceedings. The Consultant shall submit all the deliverables to ACE Impact Project Manager.
Professional Profile of Consultant:
The Consulting Firm or Agency should:
1. Be a registered agency/organization operating under either international regulations or the rules of its host Government.
2. Have a minimum of five years of experience in evaluating education and related services with extensive
3. experience in developing countries
4. Be financially sound, well reputed and with a sound track record of successful implementation of assignments with the World Bank or similar international organisation
5. Have proven experience of successfully carrying out high quality process and output evaluations in developing countries
6. Have an evaluation team that has all relevant expertise and skills to carry out the verification exercise.
7. Criteria for selecting the firm or agency shall include:
i. Experience of the firm with details of the relevant evaluation work
ii. Strength of Financial Statement
iii. CVs with Qualification of relevant staff.
iv. Staff with good communication skills in English and French both written and oral
v. Relevant testimonials provided by the firm
vi. Soundness and applicability of the proposal
vii. An understanding of the university system in West and Central Africa would be desirable.

Consultant Staff:
The Consultant is expected to put together a team of appropriate experts to undertake the individual tasks as outlined in the work plan. CVs for experts other than the Consultant (Team Leader) will not be examined during the proposal review process. However, the name of the proposed experts, their input and position shall be indicated both in the technical and in the financial proposals with indications of proposed fee rates for each expert.

Inputs:
In addition to technical expertise, the consultant shall be responsible for arranging and providing any additional resources required to carry out the work, including but not limited to the following:
Ground transportation;
Communication;
Report preparation;
Office Space and Equipment; and
Translations/Interpretation (if needed).

(ii) Responsibilities of AAU
Logistics:
The list of facilities to be provided by AAU will be finalized during negotiations. The Consultant should note that all capital items purchased under this contract will be the property of the ACE Impact Project at the end of the services. The Consultant will be expected to operate within the approved plan and budget and will not deviate without prior approval by the AAU/World Bank. The Consultant will be provided with relevant programme documents as required.

F. APPLICATION
A technical and financial proposal should be submitted separately by email to aceimpact@aau.org within four weeks of hiring the consultant. The assignment could be undertaken by single consultants or by a firm, applications from both are welcome. A notification that the application has been received will be sent automatically to the sender.
The AAU in collaboration with World Bank will execute the consultant selection process in a transparent and merit-based approach. The Consultant will be selected following the World Bank’s Guidelines
  ANNEX 8: ACE IMPACT IMPLEMENTATION PLAN TEMPLATE

Africa Centers of Excellence for Development Impact (ACE Impact)

[ACE title]

Implementation Plan

2019 – 2024

(Draft January 23, 2019)

  [List of abbreviations and acronyms]

  1. NARRATIVE SUMMARY (max 2 pages)
Provide an overview of the Center. Identify the Development Challenge to be addressed, and the expected impact on the Challenge over the Center lifetime (e.g. ad mid-term and after five years). Describe the Education and Research objectives, the methodology for both learning (pedagogy) and research as well as how the two are integrated, as well as the anticipated results both quantitative (table) and qualitative (graduates’ knowledge/skills/attitude and types of applied research results). Discuss the roles of partners – academic and sectoral – that will contribute to the Center activities and results. Include a description of important changes to the project design that have been incorporated based upon the evaluators’ feedback and on the submitted proposal and recommendations during the negotiation phase.

  2. OVERVIEW OF PLANNED OUTPUTS, REVENUE GENERATION, ACTIVITIES AND COST FOR FIRST YEAR
Provide a narrative summary (max 2 page + tables) of the planned outputs and activities for the first year of the ACE Impact Center. Focus on the launch of the Center, establishing the consortium with strong partnerships, and the activities that need to be accomplished to achieve the goals of the Center over the project lifetime.

Table 1. Overview of expected outputs and related income within the first project year
• This is a performance-based project, which means that the most important part of planning is to secure the flow of funds. This is done by ensuring that the planned activities deliver results towards the agreed DLR’s thereby ensuring planned targets for each individual DLI is reached.
• Please be mindful that the turnover time from achievement of DLI results, through verification to actual fund release to the ACE is about 6 months. That means that funds triggered through DLI’s achievements in second half of the year will only be available the next year. DLI 1 Effectiveness is designed to give each ACE sufficient capital to have funds available until own first installment based on DLI’s.
• In consecutive annual workplans it is required that each individual ACE follow its progress in meeting the different DLR’s. This is to ensure that the ACE has a balanced approach and is not lagging in any of the result areas. The DLI’s are designed to be interlinked and to reinforce each other, so lagging in one might impede expected effect of others.
Outputs and funds generation year 1 (US$) ACE results Expected outputs in numbers Percentages of the DLI Unit price Expected revenue DLI 1 Readiness DLI 1.1 Basic Readiness (0 or 100) ? DLI 1.2 Full Readiness (0 or 100) ? DLI 2 Development Impact DLI 2.1 Independent external evaluation of development impact ? DLI 3 Quantity of students DLI 3.1a New eligible PhD student’s male 10,000 DLI 3.1b New eligible PhD student’s female 12,500 DLI 3.1c New eligible PhD student’s regional male 20,000 DLI 3.1d New eligible PhD student’s regional female 25,000 DLI 3.2a New eligible Master student’s male 2,000 DLI 3.2b New eligible Master student’s female 2,500 DLI 3.2c New eligible Master student’s regional male 4,000 DLI 3.2d New eligible Master student’s regional female 5,000 DLI 3.3a New eligible short course student’s male 400 DLI 3.3b New eligible short course student’s female 500 DLI 3.3c New eligible short course student’s regional male 800 DLI 3.3d New eligible short course student’s regional female 1,000 DLI 4 Quality of Education DLI 4.1a National accreditation 100,000 DLI 4.1b GAP assessment following International standards (0 or 100) 100,000 DLI 4.1c Self-assessment following International standards (0 or 100) 100,000 DLI 4.1d International accreditation (0 or 100) 500,000 DLI 4.1e New courses meeting international standards (0 or 100) 50,000 DLI 4.2 ACE International research publications with national partners 10,000 DLI 4.2 ACE International research publications with regional partners 15,000 DLI 4.3a Infrastructure improvement for research and learning (procurement and civil works) Step 1: Approved plan (0 or 100) 300,000 DLI 4.3b Infrastructure improvement for research and learning (procurement and civil works) Step 2: Procured or Foundation Constructed (0 or 100) 300,000 DLI 4.3c Infrastructure improvement for research and learning (procurement and civil works) Step 3: Operational or Construction Completed (0 or 100) 300,000 DLI 4.3d Infrastructure improvement for research and learning (procurement and civil works) Step 2: NA or Building Operational (0 or 100) 300,000 DLI 5 Relevance of Education & Research DLI 5.1a External generated revenue from private sector X 2 DLI 5.1b External generated revenue from other sectors X 1 DLI 5.2a Number of students with at least 1-month internship or staff with placement nationally 1,000 DLI 5.2b Number of students with at least 1-month internship or staff with placement regionally 1,500 DLI 5.3 Number on new entrepreneurship, innovation, start-up companies, and commercialization support programs 100,000 DLI 6 Fiduciary Enhancement DLI 6.1 Timely fiduciary reporting (0 or 100) 15,000/year DLI 6.2 Functioning internal audit unit (0 or 100) 15,000/year DLI 6.3 Web Transparency on Fiduciary reports (0 or 100) 15,000/year DLI 6.4 Quality of Procurement planning (0 or 100) 15,000/year DLI 7 Institutional Impact DLI 7.1 University-wide regional strategy (0 or 100) 100,000 DLI 7.2a ACE host university adopts merit-based selection of university heads (0 or 100) 200,000 DLI 7.2b ACE host university adopts merit-based selection of department heads (0 or 100) 50,000 DLI 7.3a ACE host university adopts GAP analysis as part of international accreditation (0 or 100) 75,000 DLI 7.3b ACE host university adopts self-evaluation as part of international accreditation (0 or 100) 75,000 DLI 7.3c ACE host university adopts international accreditation (0 or 100) 200,000 DLI 7.4 ACE host university participate in PASET (0, 50 or 100) 50,000/year DLI 7.5 ACE host university meets its Institutional Impact as per approved proposal (0, 50 or 100) 200,000/Institutional Impact Milestone DLI 7.6 ACE host Institutions participates in NREN (0, 50 or 100) 100,000/ year Total revenue expected triggered from ACE program Additional government funding support Other external revenue generation Total Income

Table 2: Overview of expected activities and expenditures within the first project year
• Most of the outputs listed in table 1 will require activities to achieve. Please bear this in mind when populating table 2.
• This table is closely linked to Section 7 of the Implementation Plan. Each activity listed in Table 2 will require a separate Activity Sheet to be completed in Section 7.
• For additional activities, please add rows as required to Table 2.
• Ensure that each course, research project and other activity is listed separately.
• Remember to set aside a budget for participation in ACE-Impact regional workshops.
• For new centers, be aware that procurement and civil works takes time. Planning and preparation should be initiated in year one, while actual procurement and initiation of civil work most likely won’t happen before implementation year two.
• For new centers it is highly recommended to invest upfront in your partnerships. If you are planning a project launch workshop, invite all your key partners and set side a day or two to go through the Implementation Plan in detail with them to get their comments and ideas for improvement and to get their buy-in to the ACE.
• This table can be adjusted based on discussions with the partners (e.g. during the launch workshop). If adjustments are made to the approved Implementation Plan (IP), please share the updated IP with the AAU including a cover letter describing the adjustments made and the justification for these adjustments.

Code Priority Rank Result/Activity/Task Budget Estimate (US$) ACE institution Partners Total Action Plan 1 (1 highest 5 lowest) (Expected output) (Component total for ACE institution) (Component total for partners) (Total of component) (Insert sub-component number) (title of sub-component) (rank) (Insert activity number and title) (list amount for ACE institution) (list amount for partners) (list total amount for activity) (rank) (Insert activity number and title) (list amount for ACE institution)) (list amount for partners) (list total amount for activity) Action Plan 2 (1 highest 5 lowest) (Expected output) (Component total for ACE leader) (Component total for partners) (Total of component) (Insert sub-component number) (title of sub-component) (rank) (Insert activity number and title) (list amount for ACE institution) (list amount for partners) (list total amount for activity) (rank) (Insert activity number and title) (list amount for ACE institution)) (list amount for partners) (list total amount for activity) Sup-total (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) Contingency (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) TOTAL BUDGET (list amount) (list amount) (list amount)

Table 3: Overview of budget distribution among partners for year 1

• This table is a breakdown of the partner budget presented in Table 2
• The last column in Table 3 must match the second last column in Table 2
• Add rows and columns as required
• This table can be adjusted based on discussions with the partners (e.g. during the launch workshop). If adjustments are made to the approved Implementation Plan (IP), please share the updated IP with the AAU including a cover letter describing the adjustments made and the justification for these adjustments.

Code Result/Activity/Task Budget Estimate (US$) (write partner name) (write partner name) (write partner name) (write partner name) (write partner name) Total Partner Budget Action Plan 1 (Expected output) (Component total for partner) (Component total for partner) (Component total for partner) (Component total for partner) (Component total for partner) (Partners total of component) (Insert sub-component number) (title of sub-component) (Insert activity number) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list total partner amount for activity) (Insert activity number) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list total partner amount for activity) Action Plan 2 (Expected output) (Component total for partner) (Component total for partner) (Component total for partner) (Component total for partner) (Component total for partner) (Partners total of component) (Insert sub-component number) (title of sub-component) (Insert activity number) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list total partner amount for activity) (Insert activity number) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list amount) (list total partner amount for activity)  

3. TIMING OF PLANNED ACTIVITIES FOR ENTIRE PROJECT PERIOD (Gantt chart)

Table 4: Work plan for the ACE Impact project period

• Construct a Gannt Chart for the entire project period
• Gannt Charts may be developed in Excel, using project management software, or using available freeware (e.g. http://www.ganttproject.biz)

  4. IMPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENTS

4.1 Guiding Policies, Rules and Regulations
(Briefly describe the policies, rules and regulations that govern the ACE Impact Center and its partnerships. Include information on safeguarding against fraud/corruption.)
4.2 Governance Structures
(Briefly describe the ACE governance structure. Provide an updated Organization Chart including names and official titles. Describe the roles of the Sectoral Advisory Board and the International Scientific Advisory Board. Comment on the position of the Center within the host institution. Please also provide insights into how (and which) key partners are involved in the governance of the ACE)
4.3 Sectoral Advisory Board
(All ACE Impact Centers are expected to maintain a Sectoral Advisory Board (SAB), composed of regional sectoral leaders. In the Table below, identify the confirmed members of this Board, and comment on their expertise and anticipated contributions.)

Table 5: Sectoral Advisory Board

Name Position/Title Company/Organization Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title Company/Organization Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title Company/Organization Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title Company/Organization Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title Company/Organization Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title Company/Organization Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution 4.4 Sustainability
(Describe the plan for Center financial sustainability beyond the project funding period. Focus on external funding – research grants, center partners, fundraising, tuition, etc. – and prepare a roadmap for development from center launch onwards. Include details on the confirmed and the anticipated revenue from the sectoral partners that have committed to support the Center.)

4.5 International Scientific Advisory Board
(All ACE Impact Centers are expected to maintain an International Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), composed of leading academics worldwide who have agreed to provide guidance and input on the education and research activities of the Center. In the Table below, identify the confirmed members of this Board, and comment on their expertise and anticipated contributions.)

Table 6: International Scientific Advisory Board

Name Position/Title University/Institution Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title University/Institution Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title University/Institution Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title University/Institution Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title University/Institution Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title University/Institution Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution Name Position/Title University/Institution Tel. # Email Expertise Anticipated Contribution

4.6 Institutional Impact
(Briefly describe the program of activities that will be undertaken to align the host institution with global best practices for higher education. Be sure to identify the baseline for these activities. ACE’s has positively influenced their host institutions in different ways e.g.: More attention to gap analysis, self-evaluation and accreditation; training of faculty in university pedagogy and PG student supervision; more applied research designed and executed with sector partners; better financial management; more focus on external revenue generation; more attention to quality assurance; improved services of students; importance of skills training and maintenance when purchasing new equipment, use of virtual meetings to reduce travel cost; cleaner and more efficient procurement; etc.)
4.7 Incentive Structures and Mechanisms
(Briefly describe the incentive structures for involved staff – faculty, administration, management - at the ACE Impact lead and partner institutions. In addition, identify the incentives available to external stakeholders such as sectoral partners. Note that the ACE Impact project budget does not support salary top ups, sitting allowances and the like. However, there are many eligible ways to incentivize involved university staff and partners: Opportunity for skills and knowledge upgrading; better teaching and research environment and opportunities; higher turnout of publications through write shops and higher number of PG students; opportunities for participating in conferences and placements schemes; etc. It is recommended that the ACE leadership ensure that university staff supporting the center is officially assigned and recognized for their service by the university).
4.8 Roles and responsibilities of ACE team members
(Please fill the table below as well as prepare and attach as Annex 1. brief Terms of Reference (TOR) for each ACE team member and project financed support staff. Note that justification for not using existing university administrative and support staff is required. Having said that, it is still recommended to second or hire necessary support staff including a project coordinator to assist the project leadership with administration so center leadership can focus on the academic quality of the project).

Table 7: Overview of core project team:
• Positions and qualification listed are indicative adjust as appropriate. Add or subtract rows as applicable.

Position Qualification Responsibilities Centre Leader PhD/Professor • Deputy Centre Leader PhD • Project coordinator Master’s degree • M&E Officer Master’s degree • Training and Education coordinator PhD • Research coordinator PhD • Partnership Coordinator Master’s degree • Head of logistics and ICT Master’s degree • Finance officer BA degree + 5 years’ experience • Accountant BA degree + 5 years’ experience • Communication officer Master’s degree • Environmental and Social safeguards officer Master’s degree • Procurement and property management Officer BA degree + 5 years’ experience • Drivers •

4.9 Sexual Harassment policy
(Insert the Center Sexual Harassment Policy and identify the responsible staff. Ensure that the policy is also disclosed on the Center website.)
4.10 Environment and Social safeguards
(Insert the Environmental and Social Management Plan and identify the responsible staff. Ensure that the policy is also disclosed on the Center website.)
  5. PERFORMANCE MONITORING
• Please refer to the Project Appraisal Document (PAD) ANNEX 2: DLI Disbursement and Verification Protocols
• Insert the Results Framework shared with the RFU

  6. BUDGET OVERVIEW FOR ENTIRE PROJECT PERIOD

Table 8: Indicative budget, (2020 – 2024) with split between partners
• Add rows as applicable.
Expenditure Category Estimated Costs in (US$) YR 1 YR 2 YR3 YR 4 YR5 Total %of total A: Budget by Activity Plan Action Plan 1: (write title) Action Plan 2: (write title) Action Plan x: Management and Governance Contingency TOTAL % of budget B: Budget by partners (Lead institutions name) (Name of partner) (Name of partner) TOTAL

  7. DETAILED ACTIVITY SHEETS (one for each activity)
Target DLI: Timeframe: Activity: Sub-Activity/Task: ACTIVITY OUTPUT OUTPUT INDICATOR SOURCE OF VERIFICATION IMPLEMENTATION MILESTONES PROCUREMENT RESPONSIBILITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION DURATION: Commencement: Completion: PRIMARY CONSTITUENTS: PARTICIPANTS: ASSUMPTIONS FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS/BUDGET LINE Budget Line Analysis 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr 5th Qtr 6th Qtr Total 1 2 3 4 5 TOTALS DETAILED ACTIVITY SHEETS (with explanatory notes) Target DLI: Which DLI is this Activity linked to Timeframe: State the planning period Activity: Code and Name Sub-Activity/Task: Code and Name (Split activity into tasks if these are discrete and has distinct outputs. It should not be a sequential listing of actions that progressively lead to the same output.) ACTIVITY As above Target DLI/OUTPUT Specify which target DLI or Activity from Table 1 or 2 OUTPUT INDICATOR Indicate the quantitative and/or qualitative statistic/parameter that provides a simple and reliable means to measure achievement. SOURCE OF VERIFICATION Specify source of the information for the measurements/indicators specified.
IMPLEMENTATION MILESTONES
State the prior, more easily achieved and measured short term and intermediate changes that lead to the long-term outcomes. Milestones indicate the interim measurable landmarks, sub-tasks, or what needs to be accomplished over time and are useful for planning concise short term strategies and collaborations that contribute to full implementation of a stated activity and achievement of long term outcomes (e.g. products related to knowledge - guidelines, strategies, analysis; products related to physical dimension – medicine/minerals/food; products related to behaviour change - campaigns, TV and radio programmes, documentaries, shows, public debates; products related to capacity development - conferences, working groups, trainings; products related to use of results - using policy and technology-related research-based knowledge, strengthening capacity to use research, public awareness, political will, policy adoption and implementation, physical and social changes in lives and communities including negative and positive changes, reversals and backlash, gender equality and women’s empowerment).
PROCUREMENT
Indicate any procurement preference and the major cost elements (e.g. hardware, software, tickets and travel, equipment, consultancies, etc.) and/or conditionality associated with source of funding
RESPONSIBILITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION
Assign names (office, individual, organizations) associated with or charged with responsibility for the specific task.
DURATION: (Indicate average estimated time for sub-tasks as indicated by Milestones if applicable) Commencement: Dates Completion: Dates
PRIMARY CONSTITUENTS: State the individuals, groups, organizations, whether targeted or not that will be most affected by the intervention.
PARTICIPANTS: Specify collaborators (actors you will work with directly contributing towards implementation of the action) and/or those that will exert influence (positive or negative) on success.
ASSUMPTIONS
State (if any) the key factors or risks which could affect the progress or success of the action.
FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS/BUDGET LINE
Indicate the budget line to fund the activity here, and in the section below estimate the costs of the interventions based on targets contained in the milestones, the coverage of each intervention or activity together with the associated unit costs. State any specific concerns: e.g. costing covers only key technical programmatic areas, areas that have been omitted and why, resources required to address specific needs, improving adherence to procedures, poor compliance and associated increase in cost. Budget Line
Analysis 1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr 5th Qtr 6th Qtr Total 1 Major Cost item 2 3 4 5 TOTALS   Example 1: DETAILED ACTIVITY SHEET Target DLI: DLI 1 Readiness Timeframe: Quarter 2 and 3, 2019 Activity: 1-A-19 Set up Institutional Framework for the Commencement of ACE Sub-Activity/Task: 1-A1-19 Put in place operational manual for ACE administration: procurement, financial management, monitoring and evaluation (M&E). RESULT A working operation manual ACTIVITY Put in place operational manual for ACE administration: procurement, financial management, M&E OUTPUT • Draft procurement management operational manual • Draft financial management operational manual • Draft M&E operational manual OUTPUT INDICATOR • Submission of procurement operational manual • Submission of financial management operational manual • Submission of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) operational manual SOURCE OF VERIFICATION • Approved procurement operational manual • Approved financial management operational manual • Approved M&E operational manual IMPLEMENTATION MILESTONES • Draft Procurement, Financial Management and M&E operational manual (OM) ready by 15th May 2019 • OM revised and ready for approval by 30th June 2019 • OM approved by 15th September 2019 PROCUREMENT Consultancy (optional) RESPONSIBILITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION Center-leader, procurement officer, finance officer, quality assurance officer and M&E officer (both from ACE team and from the University). Partners will be presented for draft OMs for commenting DURATION: 6 months Commencement: April 2019 Completion: September 2019 PRIMARY CONSTITUENTS: • ACE team • Center Leader PARTICIPANTS: ACE team University procurement office University finance team University QA and M&E team ASSUMPTIONS • OM will be made in collaboration with relevant university units • Relevant staff (including from central management) interested in this and willing to fulfil the task • Specific measurement to eliminate risk of corruption and improve overall efficiency of procurement and financial management is included in the operational manual (as excellence is better that the normal university standard) FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS/BUDGET LINE ACE budget for the activity, no partner budget for this   Budget Line Analysis 1stQtr 2ndQtr 3rdQtr 4thQtr 5thQtr 6thQtr Total 1 Drafting OMs 6,000 6,000 2 OMs revision 3,000 3,000 3 Approval of OMs 1,500 1,500 TOTALS 9,000 1,500 10,500   Example 2: DETAILED ACTIVITY SHEET Target DLI: DLI 3 Quantity of Students (DLI 3.1 PhD students & DLI 3.2 Master students) Timeframe: Quarter 2 and 3, 2019 Activity: 3-A-19 Develop recruitment process for new PG students Sub-Activity/Task: 3-A1-19 Develop advertisements material, selection criteria, screening and interview procedures RESULT MSc and PhD students’ recruitment process established ACTIVITY Recruitment process for MSc and PhD students (advertisements material, selection criteria, screening and interview procedures) OUTPUT Advertisement campaign completed timely and screening procedure approved by the Scientific Advisory Board (ACE) and relevant Faculty Boards (University). OUTPUT INDICATOR Advertisement material (with a strategy on how to target and attract female and regional students) Approved screening guidelines SOURCE OF VERIFICATION - Advertisements records - Selection criteria documents IMPLEMENTATION MILESTONES - Advertise MSc and PhD programs timely and targeted - Development and approval of selection procedures PROCUREMENT Advertisement contracts RESPONSIBILITY FOR IMPLEMENTATION Communication officer, Training and Education coordinator and partners. To be executed in collaboration with Registrar and relevant departmental heads DURATION: 6 months Commencement: April 2019 Completion: August 2019 PRIMARY CONSTITUENTS: National and regional institutions of higher learning including non-academic institutions, donor community, youth with a first or second degree. PARTICIPANTS: Relevant university staff. Ultimately national and regional students ASSUMPTIONS Ability to reach and motivate sufficient number of qualified youths interested in pursuing a PG education within relevant programs Relevant staff (including partners) interested in this and willing to fulfil the task Availability of funding Stability in university systems (no strikes) FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS/BUDGET LINE ACE budget for the activity, no partner budget for this   Budget Line Analysis 1stQtr 2ndQtr 3rdQtr 4thQtr 5thQtr 6thQtr Total 1 Develop advertisement material that targets qualified female and regional youth 2,000 2,000 2 Advertise MSc and PhD, programs 5,000 5,000 3 Develop Screening Guidelines 3,000 3,000 4 First Scientific Advisory Board Meeting* 5 Approval of Screening Guidelines 1,000 1,000 TOTALS 10,000 1,000 11,000 *=The first Scientific Advisory Board Meeting will also discuss curriculum review, costing for this meeting is on a separate activity sheet.


ANNEX 9: MILESTONES FORMULATION FOR DLR 4.3 – IMPROVED TEACHING AND LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

A. FIRST ACE IMPACT

Table A12.1: Burkina Faso Approved Milestones Formulation per Center

CEA-CFOREM Plan d’action des RLD Description des Résultats/Activités/Taches Critères de vérification Délai d’achè-vement Estimation du Budget (€) Décais-sements ($) DLI 4.3.1 – Jalon 1 Réalisation des études architecturales et techniques de la nouvelle infrastructure de CFOREM Etudes d’impact social et environnemental du site 14246,4 o Screening du projet de construction du CFOREM par le Ministère de l'Environnement o Recrutement du consultant pour les études de sauvegardes sociales et environnementales o Atelier de validation du rapport d'étude d’impact environnemental et social du projet o Payement des droits fixes du BUNEE • Auto-certification sur les réglementations institutionnelles de passation des marchés • Préparation du plan de passation des marchés (approuvé par la Banque mondiale) • Certificat de conformité PGES disponible et posté sur le site • Appel d’offre, documents d'ouverture et d'évaluation des Novembre 2020 (réalisé) 14 246,4 300 000 (EURO 262,000) Réalisation des études architecturales et techniques : 104175,0 o Recrutement d'un consultant pour l'élaboration du cahier de charge pour le recrutement du cabinet d’études architecturales et techniques o Réunion de validation du cahier de charge pour le recrutement du cabinet de l'étude architecturale et technique o Recrutement des cabinets pour la réalisation des études architecturales et techniques (études du sol, contrôles techniques) o Atelier de validation des rapports des études architecturales et techniques • offres • Signature des contrats attribués avec devis quantitatifs • Tous les documents publiés sur le site Web du centre Mars 2021 104 175 RLD 4.3.2 – Jalon 2 Réhabilitation des anciennes infrastructures actuelles de formation et de recherche Acquisition de matériel roulant Acquisition de matériel et de consommables pédagogiques et de recherche Assurer l’entretien et la réfection des infrastructures actuelles de formation et de recherche = 76 705  o Identification, quantification et planification des besoins de réfection en relation avec les activités de CFOREM o Atelier de validation des besoins, spécifications et plan des réfections o Réalisation des réfections o Acquisition et installation des groupes électrogènes et d'onduleurs pour assurer la continuité du courant dans les laboratoires • Auto-certification sur les réglementations institutionnelles de passation des marchés • Préparation du plan de passation des marchés (approuvé par la Banque mondiale) • Certificat de conformité PGES disponible et posté sur le site (pour les travaux de réhabilitation) • Appel d’offre, documents d'ouverture et d'évaluation des offres (pour les travaux et tous les équipements/ véhicules/consommables) • Signature des contrats attribués avec devis quantitatifs (pour les travaux et tous les équipements) • Certification d'achèvement des travaux par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu • Bordereaux de réception, inspection et installation complète de tous équipements/véhicules/ consommables • Tous les équipements achetés sont opérationnels et clairement marqués comme propriété de l'institution, et enregistrés dans le registre des actifs de l'institution • Certificat de formation du personnel en charge du fonctionnement des équipements • Tous les documents et photos publiés sur le site Web du centre Mars 2021 76 705 300 000 (EURO 262,000) Rendre disponible les logements sains, sécurisés, adaptés et financièrement accessibles aux étudiants : 15397,4 o   Identification de bâtiments o   Aménagement Mars 2021 153 97,4 Faciliter le déplacement académique des étudiants et des enseignants = 167 693,9 o   Acquisition du mini car de 30 places o   Acquisition du véhicule 4X4 Mars 2021 167 693,9 Acquérir de matériel et de consommables pédagogiques = 9833,0 o Accessibilité à internet haut débit dans les locaux actuels de CFOREM o Maintenance du matériel pédagogique Mars 2021 9833,0 Acquérir de matériel et de consommables de recherche (pour 2019, 2020) =202272,4 o Missions des membres de l'équipe dans les laboratoires partenaires du nord pour l'affinement des besoins et des spécifications o Acquisition et installation du matériel lourd de laboratoire (équipements) o Formation des utilisateurs o Acquisition des réactifs, consommables et petits matériels de laboratoire Mars 2021 202272,4 RLD 4.3.3 – Jalon 3 Construction des nouvelles infrastructures de formation et de recherche Recrutement de l'entreprise de construction et du cabinet de suivi-contrôle pour tous les travaux de construction = 4573,5 • Auto-certification sur les réglementations institutionnelles de passation des marchés • Certificat de conformité PGES • Reçus des payement aux différents prestataires • Certification par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu confirmant le niveau de construction atteint (fondation, sous-sol, RDC et Etages) • Tous les documents et photos du bâtiment démontrant le niveau atteint sur le site du centre Juin 2021 4573,5 Construction des fondations et sous-sol = 355 206,2 o Suivi du respect des politiques de sauvegardes sociales et environnementales lors de la construction o Payement de l'entreprise de construction pour tous les travaux • Payement du cabinet de suivi-contrôle des travaux Décembre 2021 355 206,2 300 000 (EURO 262,000) Construire le Bâtiment (RDC, Etages 1, 2, 3, toits) : 179127,6 o Suivi du respect des politiques de sauvegardes sociales et environnementales lors de la construction o Payement de l'entreprise de construction pour tous les travaux o Payement du cabinet de suivi-contrôle des travaux Décembre 2021 179127,6 RLD 4.3.4 – Jalon 4 Réalisation des finitions des nouvelles infrastructures de formation et de recherche             Réaliser la finition 1 (toitures, enduits, ouvertures, peinture, carreaux, …) : 221 051,1 o Suivi du respect des politiques de sauvegardes sociales et environnementales lors de la construction o Payement de l'entreprise de construction pour tous les travaux o Payement du cabinet de suivi-contrôle des travaux • Auto-certification sur les réglementations institutionnelles de passation des marchés • Certificat de conformité PGES • Reçus des payement aux différents prestataires • Certification par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu confirmant le niveau de construction atteint (Finitions 1 et 2) • Bordereaux de réception, inspection et installation complète des équipements, du mobilier, accessoires et équipements • Tous les équipements et le mobilier sont clairement indiqués comme propriété de l'établissement et inscrits au registre des actifs de l'établissement • Tous les documents et photos du bâtiment démontrant le niveau atteint et des équipements installés sur le site du centre Juin 2022 221 051,1 300 000 (EURO 262,000) Réaliser la finition 2 : installation électrique, plomberie, internet, air conditionnée, ventilation centrale : 145 588,9 o Suivi du respect des politiques de sauvegardes sociales et environnementales lors de la construction o Payement de l'entreprise de construction pour tous les travaux o Payement du cabinet de suivi-contrôle des travaux Juin 2022 145 588,9 RLD 4.3.5 – Jalon 5 Acquisition d’équipements pour les nouvelles infrastructures de formation et de recherche                         Equiper le bâtiment en mobilier de bureau et mobilier de laboratoire : 158023,6 o Elaboration des besoins et des spécifications à intégrer dans le DAO o Atelier de validation des besoins en équipements du nouveau Bâtiment o Acquisition et installation du mobilier • Auto-certification sur les réglementations institutionnelles de passation des marchés • Préparation du plan de passation des marchés (approuvé par la Banque mondiale) • Certificat de conformité PGES disponible et posté sur le site (pour les travaux de réhabilitation) • Appel d’offre, documents d'ouverture et d'évaluation des offres (pour les travaux et tous les équipements/ • véhicules/consommables) • Signature des contrats attribués avec devis quantitatifs (pour les travaux et tous les équipements) • Certification d'achèvement des travaux par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu • Bordereaux de réception, inspection et installation complète de tous équipements/véhicules/consommables • Tous les équipements achetés sont opérationnels et clairement marqués comme propriété de l'institution, et enregistrés dans le registre des actifs de l'institution • Certificat de formation du personnel en charge du fonctionnement des équipements • Tous les documents et photos publiés sur le site Web du centre Novembre 2022 158 023,6 300 000 (EURO 262,000) Equiper le bâtiment en groupes électrogènes, en énergie solaire, en ascenseur, chambres froides : 163774,5 o Equiper le bâtiment en groupes électrogènes et en onduleurs de grande capacité o Equiper le bâtiment en ascenseur o Equiper le laboratoire de 03 chambres froides Novembre 2022 163 774,5 Equiper le bâtiment en locaux spécifiques (salle stérile, pharmacie expérimentale, culture cellulaire, animalerie) : 244806,1 o   Equiper le laboratoire en chambre stérile o   Equiper le laboratoire en salle de culture cellulaire o   Equiper le laboratoire pour animalerie o   Equiper le Centre d'une pharmacie expérimentale (ou pédagogique) Novembre 2022 244 806,1 RLD 4.3.6 – Jalon 6 Achèvement de la construction des nouvelles infrastructures de formation et de recherche et acquisition de matériel et de consommables pédagogiques et de recherche des nouvelles infrastructures   Acquérir le matériel de laboratoire pour la recherche scientifique (matériels lourds, consommables et consommables) : 535570,76 o Missions des membres de l'équipe dans les laboratoires partenaires du nord pour l'affinement des besoins et des spécifications techniques du matériel o Organiser un atelier de validation des besoins et des spécifications techniques o Acquisition et installation du matériel lourd de laboratoire o Formation des utilisateurs o Acquisition des réactifs, consommables et petits matériels de laboratoire • Auto-certification sur les réglementations institutionnelles de passation des marchés • Préparation du plan de passation des marchés (approuvé par la Banque mondiale) • Certificat de conformité PGES disponible et posté sur le site (pour les travaux de réhabilitation) • Appel d’offre, documents d'ouverture et d'évaluation des offres (pour les travaux et tous les équipements/ • véhicules/consommables) • Signature des contrats attribués avec devis quantitatifs (pour les travaux et tous les équipements) • Certification d'achèvement des travaux par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu • Bordereaux de réception, inspection et installation complète de tous équipements/véhicules/consommables • Tous les équipements achetés sont opérationnels et clairement marqués comme propriété de l'institution, et enregistrés dans le registre des actifs de l'institution • Certificat de formation du personnel en charge du fonctionnement des équipements • Tous les documents et photos publiés sur le site Web du centre Novembre 2022 535 570,76 300 000 (EURO 262,000) Acquérir des matériels pédagogiques (audiovisuel, visio-conférence, …) : 31175,9 o Acquisition et installation des équipements de visio-conférence pour la nouvelle infrastructure o Accessibilité à internet haut débit dans les locaux actuels de CFOREM o Maintenance du matériel pédagogique Novembre 2022 31 175,9 Acquérir des consommables et des équipements médico-techniques et de laboratoires au profit des partenaires sectoriels : 77511,5 o Atelier de validation des besoins des partenaires o Acquisition et installation du matériel médico-techniques o Acquisition des consommables et réactifs pour faciliter l'encadrement des stagiaires, mémorants et doctorants chez les partenaires Novembre 2022 77 511,5 Réception et inauguration de la construction des nouvelles infrastructures de formation et de recherche Décembre 2022 PM TOTAL   EURO 2 706 732,6 1 800 000 (EURO 1,572,000) COLLÈGE D’INGÉNIERIE POUR LA FORMATION ET LA RECHERCHE EN SCIENCES ET TECHNOLOGIES D’INGÉNIERIE DE L’ÉNERGIE ET DES INFRASTRUCTURES EN AFRIQUE DE L’OUEST ET DU CENTRE - CoE-2iE – Plan d’action des RLD Résultats/Activités/Taches Délai d’achèvement Estimation du Budget (euros) Décaissements (EUR) RLD 4.3.1 – Jalon 1 (Phase préparatoire à l’exécution des travaux) Description des Résultats/Activités/Taches A - Respect de la réglementation de construction (Conformités architecturales, Notice d’Impact environnementale et Sociale (NIES) publiée, respect des normes sécuritaires et d’accès des personnes à mobilité réduite) • Demandes de devis à l’architecte et à l’Ingénieur chargé de la sécurité • Contrat de l’architecte et de l’Ingénieur de de Sécurité • Plans signés par l’architecte et rapport d’études certifié de l’Ingénieur en charge de la sécurité B- Recrutement et contractualisation avec le bureau d’études • Lettres de consultation restreinte aux bureaux d’études consultés • Documents d’ouverture des plis et d’analyse des offres • Procès-verbal d’attribution de marchés d’études • Contrat de bureau d’études de suivi de travaux signé C- Recrutement et contractualisation avec les entreprises de travaux • Dossier de consultation des entreprises de travaux • Lettres de consultation restreinte aux entreprises consultées • Documents d’ouverture des plis et d’analyse des offres • Procès-verbal d’attribution de marchés de travaux • Marché de travaux de l’entreprise avec le devis estimatif joint. D- Recrutement et contractualisation avec les fournisseurs des équipements de laboratoire • Dossier d’appels d’offres International pour les équipements de laboratoires • Documents d’ouverture des plis et d’analyse des offres • Procès-verbal d’attribution de marchés des équipements • Signature des Contrats des fournisseurs des équipements avec la liste des biens ainsi que les devis en annexe E – Documents de autre certification • Auto-certification de la procédure de passation de marchés • Plan de passation de Marchés validé • Certificat de conformité PGES disponible et posté sur le site Web • Tous les documents seront publiés sur le site Web du Centre 31 Mai 2020     262.000 262.000 DLI 4.3.2 – Jalon 2 (Phase de réception et de vérification des travaux) Description des Résultats/Activités/Taches F - Les travaux sont réceptionnés et certifiés • Procès-verbal de réception provisoire • Certificat de fin de travaux délivré par le maitre d’œuvre • Photos des bâtiments construits ou réhabilités G- Les équipements sont réceptionnés et mis en service • Procès-verbal de réception des équipements • Constat d’installation et de mise en service des équipements H- Documents de justification fournis • Le registre des actifs est fourni • Certification par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu confirmant l'achèvement des travaux • Mise en service et inauguration du bâtiment • Auto-certification de la procédure de passation de marchés • Tous les documents et photos des travaux terminés (avant/après) et des équipements sont publiés sur le site Web du centre 31 Mai 2022 262.000 262.000 TOTAL 564 000 564 000 Centre d’Excellence Africain en Innovations Biotechnologiques pour l’Elimination des Maladies à Transmission Vectorielle [CEA/ITECH-MTV] Plan d’action des RLD Résultats/Activités/Taches Délai d’achèvement Estimation du Budget (EURO) Décaissements (EURO) RLD 4.3.1 – Jalon 1 Acquisition d’un système de visio-conférence avec une connectivité internet de haut débit et Préparation du projet architectural/autorisations/plans d’exécution des rénovations et du complexe CEA • Auto-certifications de conformité avec les procédures de passation de marché et signées par le contrôle financier • Préparation du plan de passation des marchés (approuvé par la Banque mondiale) • Appel d’offres et documents d'ouverture et d'évaluation des offres • Photos des réalisations physiques sur le site web du centre • Publication du rapport de la notice d'impact environnemental et social assorti du plan de gestion social et environnemental sur le site Web du CEA • Publication des différents contrats sur le site web du CEA • Publication du procès-verbal de réception technique et provisoire sur le site Web du CEA • Confirmation que tous les équipements sont estampillés et enregistrés dans le registre des immobilisations de l’Université 31-déc-2020 € 253,132 $300,000 (€ 262,000) DLI 4.3.2 – Jalon 2 Achèvement des travaux de rénovation avec équipement des salles de cours et début d’exécution des travaux de construction du complexe CEA jusqu’à 20% • Auto-certifications de conformité avec les procédures de passation de marché et signées par le contrôle financier • Appel d’offres et documents d'ouverture et d'évaluation des offres • Photos des réalisations physiques sur le site web du centre • Publication des différents contrats sur le site web du CEA • Publication du procès-verbal de réception technique et provisoire sur le site Web du CEA • Confirmation que tous les équipements sont estampillés et enregistrés dans le registre des immobilisations de l’Université • Publication du rapport de la notice d'impact environnemental et social assorti du plan de gestion social et environnemental sur le site Web du CEA • Certification par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu confirmant le % d'achèvement atteint 31-juil-2021 € 338,471 $300,000 (€ 262,000) RLD 4.3.3 – Jalon 3 Exécution des travaux de construction du complexe CEA à 50% et acquisition d’équipement de laboratoire • Auto-certifications de conformité avec les procédures de passation de marché et signées par le contrôle financier • Photos des réalisations physiques sur le site web du centre • Appel d’offres et documents d'ouverture et d'évaluation des offres • Publication des différents contrats sur le site web du CEA • Publication du procès-verbal de réception technique et provisoire sur le site Web du CEA • Confirmation que tous les équipements sont estampillés et enregistrés dans le registre des immobilisations de l’Université • Certification par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu confirmant le % d'achèvement atteint 31-déc-2021 € 380,766 $300,000 (€ 262,000) RLD 4.3.4 – Jalon 4 Exécution des travaux de construction du complexe CEA à 90% • Auto-certifications de conformité avec les procédures de passation de marché et signées par le contrôle financier • Certification par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu confirmant le % d'achèvement atteint • Photos des réalisations physiques sur le site web du centre • Publication des différents contrats sur le site web du CEA • Publication du procès-verbal de réception technique et provisoire sur le site Web du CEA 31-juil-2022 € 253,848 $300,000 (€ 262,000) RLD 4.3.5 – Jalon 5 Achèvement à 100% et livraison du bâtiment du complexe CEA au maître d’ouvrage (UNB) • Auto-certifications de conformité avec les procédures de passation de marché et signées par le contrôle financier • Photos des réalisations physiques (bâtiment et installations utilisées par les étudiants) sur le site web du centre • Publication des différents contrats sur le site web du CEA • Publication du procès-verbal de réception technique et provisoire sur le site Web du CEA • Confirmation que le bâtiment et le mobilier ont été enregistré dans le registre des immobilisations de l’Université • Certification d'achèvement à 100% par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu • Mise en service du bâtiment 31-juil-2023 € 169,413 $300,000 (€ 262,000) RLD 4.3.6 – Jalon 6 Acquisition d’équipement de laboratoire pour le complexe CEA • Auto-certifications de conformité avec les procédures de passation de marché et signées par le contrôle financier • Photos des réalisations physiques sur le site web du centre • Publication des différents contrats sur le site web du CEA • Publication du procès-verbal de réception technique et provisoire sur le site Web du CEA • Confirmation que tous les équipements sont estampillés et enregistrés dans le registre des immobilisations de l’Université 31-déc-2023 € 176,370 $300,000 (€ 262,000) TOTAL € 1,572,000 € 1,572,000 Centre d’Etudes, de Formation et de Recherche en Gestion des Risques Sociaux (CEFORGRIS) JALONS OBJECTIF ACTIVITES CRITERES DE VERIFICATION Délai d’achèvement Estimation du Budget (USD) Décaissements (USD/SDR/EUR) JALON 1 Rénovation des bureaux du CEFORGRIS • Cloisonnement de la salle P4 en 9 bureaux et de la salle de réunion • Aménagement de salles d'eau communes • Installation de ventilateurs et de système à air conditionné • Auto-certification de conformité avec les procédures de passation de marché • Préparation du plan de passation des marchés (approuvé par la Banque mondiale) • Certificat de conformité PGES disponible et posté sur le site Web • Appel d’offre et documents d'ouverture et d'évaluation des offres • Publication de tous les contras sur le site • Les factures de livraison sont disponibles dans les archives du centre • Installation complète du mobilier, accessoires et équipements • Tous les équipements achetés sont opérationnels et clairement marqués comme propriété de l'institution, et enregistrés dans le registre des actifs de l'institution • Certification d'achèvement à 100% par un ingénieur indépendant reconnu • Mise en service du bâtiment • Photos des constructions terminées et de tous les équipements installés (en utilisation par les étudiants) sur le site web Mars 2022 37954 $300,000 (EURO 262,000) Rénovation de l’infrastructure du partenaire Aménagement du bureau enseignant Installation du système de projection Acquisition de mobilier 8453 Réalisation des études pour la construction du bâtiment du CEFORGRIS Signature du contrat avec le bureau d’études Validation du rapport 48700 Construction et équipement d’un local pour le CEFORGRIS Achèvement de tous les travaux de construction : • Constructions de la fondation Construction du rez-de-chaussée 204960 TOTAL 299968 300 000 (EURO 262,000) Table A12.2: Djibouti Approved Milestones Formulation per Center Formulations under review. Table A12.3: Ghana Approved Milestones Formulation per Center
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