REGIONAL OPERATIONS MANUAL

OF THE 

AFRICA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTRES OF EXCELLENCE FOR DEVELOPMENT IMPACT

(ACE IMPACT)

 

FOR 11 AFRICAN COUNTRIES

(BENIN, BURKINA FASO, COTE D’IVOIRE, DJIBOUTI, GAMBIA, GHANA, GUINEA, NIGER, NIGERIA, SENEGAL, TOGO)

 

December 15, 2020

Table of Contents

THE PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE OPERATIONS MANUAL

  1. The “Project Regional Operations Manual” (OM) for the First and Second Africa Higher Education Centers of Excellence for Development Impact (1st and 2nd ACE Impact) projects is defined in the Financing Agreements between the Recipient Countries and the World Bank, as the manual to be adopted by the projects’ Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) and communicated to the participating countries for the implementation of the projects, including, inter alia:  (i) the terms of reference, functions and responsibilities for the members or the personnel of the Regional Project Steering Committee (PSC) and RFU; (ii) the procedures for procurement of goods, non-consulting services, consultants’ services, Operating Costs, and training, financial management and audits; (iii) the indicators for monitoring and evaluation; (iv) the terms of reference for the Independent Verifiers; (v) the detailed content of the EEP Spending Reports; (vi) the Disbursement-Linked-Indicators (DLIs) and -results (DLRs); and (vii) the grievance mechanisms.

  2. The OM may be amended from time to time by the projects’ RFU (AAU) with prior written approval from the World Bank

PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES

a) The Project Development Objectives:

  1. The Project Development Objective (PDO) is to improve the quality, quantity and development impact of postgraduate[1] education in selected universities through regional specialization and collaboration. In this respect, the Project will support the 12 Recipient Countries to promote regional specialization among participating universities in thematic areas that address regional challenges and strengthen the capacities of these universities to deliver quality training and applied research.
  2. The overarching objective is to meet the demands of the labour market for skills and applied research in specific priority sectors, where there are shortages affecting development outcomes and economic growth.

b)  Project Beneficiaries

  1. The beneficiaries of the Projects are:
  2. Students in the selected centers and those enrolled in the host institutions of the centers, as well as students in partner institutions across West and Central Africa and Djibouti. Further, current and future students will have an expanded choice of quality and development-related education programs within West and Central Africa;
  3. Faculty and staff from the centers, host institutions and partner institutions who improve their qualifications and teaching and research conditions.
  4. Employers and other knowledge partners, including Ministries and public entities, who will have easier access to highly skilled professionals and to applied research for solutions to pressing development challenges; and
  5. The general population in West and Central Africa and Djibouti who will benefit from a network of dynamic university centers focused on the generation of skills and applied research to drive development.

c) Key Indicators:

  1. The following indicators will measure progress towards achieving the PDO:
    • Number of students (national and regional) enrolled in postgraduate programmes in the selected ACEs (Quantity of Education & Regional Specialization).
    • Number of ACE programmes and ACE host institutions that obtain international accreditation (Quality of Education).
    • Number of ACEs that have substantial development impact (as measured by an independent evaluation of each centre’s impact on development at mid-term and end of project).
    • Percentage of ACE host institutions with a comprehensive strategic plan for regionalization (Regional Specialization and Collaboration).
    • Number of students and faculty participating in internships and/or apprenticeships in relevant industry/sector institutions (Development Impact of Education).

[1] In this project, postgraduate is defined to include master’s and Ph.D. degrees, and short-term professional courses.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF COMPONENTS

  1. The two projects covered under this OM are the 1st ACE Impact and 2nd ACE Impact Projects. Both projects have the same technical design, including common evaluation and selection schedule and processes, this project operational manual (OM), as well as implementation arrangement structures. The regional facilitation unit (RFU), which will be hosted at the Association of African Universities (AAU), will be responsible for regional coordination and monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities for both projects (it will be financed under the 1st ACE Impact project through a regional grant).
  1. The primary differences between the two projects are: the list of participating countries; and the preparation schedule. The 1st ACE Impact project countries were selected based on the following criteria: (i) country readiness, (ii) expressed interest – countries that expressed interest in participating in the project first are prioritized; and (iii) planned elections – those countries with planned elections in February – March 2019 were also prioritized. The 1st ACE Impact countries and entities include: Burkina Faso, Djibouti, Ghana, Guinea, Senegal and AAU. Specifically, under the 1st ACE Impact, there are 16 (6 renewals) ACEs; 2 Emerging Centers and 3 Colleges of Engineering. Additionally, there are 2 National Facilitation Agencies (National Council for Tertiary Education (NCTE) in Ghana and an implementation unit under the Ministère de l’Enseignement Supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation, MMERSRI-PIU in Burkina Faso), and 1 Regional Facilitation Unit (AAU). The 2nd ACE Impact countries and entities include: Benin, Cote d’Ivoire, Niger, Nigeria, The Gambia, and Togo. Specifically, under the 2nd ACE Impact, there are 28 ACEs; 3 Emerging Centers and 3-6 Colleges of Engineering, 1 National Facilitation Agency (the National Universities Commission (NUC) in Nigeria), and an implementation unit under the Ministère de l’Enseignement Supérieur et de la Recherche Scientifique in Cote d’Ivoire.
  1. The project consists of three components.
  • Component 1: Establishing new and scaling-up well-performing existing ACEs (from ACE I) for development impact;
  • Component 2: Fostering regional partnerships and scholarships; and
  • Component 3: Enhancing national and regional project facilitation and, monitoring and evaluation (M&E).
  1. Component 1 will aim to strengthen capacity in the ACEs and their host institutions (supply-side); Component 2 will aim to strengthen non-ACE institutions in the region and allow students to benefit from the capacity in the ACEs (demand-side). Component 3 will aim to support national and regional facilitation of the project and M&E related activities. Financing for Component 1 and 2 will be result-based, while financing for Component 3 will be cost-based.

a) Component 1: Establishing new and scaling-up well-performing existing ACEs (from ACE I) for development impact

  1. Component 1 aims to build and strengthen the capacity of 44 competitively selected centers and 7 Schools of Engineering located in higher education institutions across West and Central Africa. Component 1 has two sub-components: Sub-component 1.1 will support new ACE Impact centers and Sub-component 1.2 will provide additional support to well performing ACE I centers.

Sub-component 1.1: Support to establish new centers of excellence

  1. Sub-component 1.1 will establish twenty-six (26) new ACE Impact centers and increase the number of quality centers and relevant programs offered in the region and to introduce new thematic areas that do not exist in ACE I. All ACE Impact I countries, except Djibouti, will have an ACE Impact center. This sub-component will fund new centers between US$4 million and US$8 million (average US$5.3 million) to each center to fund its activities. The funding allocation to each center depends on the thematic area, the overall funding needs indicated in the center’s proposal, the funding envelope of the center’s government and the government’s priorities. The release of funds will be linked to the achievement of seven DLIs: (a) Institutional readiness results (DLI1); (b) development impact of the ACE Impact Center (DLI2); (c) quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization (DLI3); (d) quality of education and research through international accreditation, research publication and improved teaching and research infrastructure (DLI4); (e) relevance of education and research through externally generated revenue internships and entrepreneurship (DLI5); (f) timeliness and quality of fiduciary management (DLI6); and (g) Institutional impact- to be accomplished by the ACE host institution (DLI 7). The disbursement amount by result is uniform across centers and countries for DLI3, DLI4, DLI5, and DLI 7, because a unit cost can reasonably be established for these results, for instance unit cost for a student or a research publication. Disbursement amounts for DLI1, DLI2, and DLI6 differ by center because they are relative to the center’s funding envelope, because the results are related to the overall performance of the center, notably implementation readiness, impact of center and fiduciary management.

Sub-component 1.2: Support to scale-up well performing ACE I centers

  1. Sub-component 1.2 aims to provide additional funding and support to eighteen (18) existing ACEs (currently supported under the ACE I project) to enable them to scale-up their activities and deepen their development impact. Funding under this sub-component will help these centers to: strengthen productive partnerships with industry, sectoral stakeholders, ministries and policymakers; boost their regional leadership of regional networks; allow centers to lead efforts in the training of quality postgraduate students and maintain their international accreditation; and act as drivers of applied research solutions to development challenges in the region. The funding to renewed centers are from US$2 million – US$ 4.5 million, with an average funding of US$3.6 million. This is equivalent to approximately half the amount of funding previously provided under ACE I, with the expectation that most of these centers will not require capital intensive civil works at the levels they needed in ACE I. Further, these ACEs will be supported to increase their fundraising efforts to become fully sustainable after this round of funding. The allocation to each center depended upon the thematic area, overall funding needs indicated in the center’s proposal, the funding envelope of the center’s government, and the government’s priorities. While the release of funds will be linked to the achievement of the same seven DLIs listed under Sub-component 1.1 above, the DLI amounts for each center under this Sub-component 1.2 will vary between ACEs to customize to the center-specific objectives.

Additional support for Social and Environmental Risk Management Training

  1. Burkina Faso will give add-on funding of US$2.5 million to an ACE Impact center under Component 1 to develop and offer training in Social and Environmental Risk Management. The center will achieve its objectives through: (i) creating a regional network of academics and practitioners in social and environment risk management; (ii) conducting training for agencies of infrastructure and natural resources projects; and (iii) facilitating regional sharing of experiences and learning in safeguards risk management, grievance redress mechanisms (GRMs) and benefit-sharing. Graduates will be equipped with comprehensive and interdisciplinary knowledge in environmental and social sustainability and will deepen their understanding of the role of environmental and social risk assessment and management in project development and implementation.

Additional support to engineering and technology ACE host institutions 

  1. Seven institutions that are selected to host an engineering or technology-focused centers with capacity in other engineering disciplines will receive additional funding in Ghana, Benin, Burkina Faso, Djibouti and Nigeria. This funding will support an institution-wide strengthening of the engineering and technology programs within their College or School of Engineering (CoEngg).  The CoEngg are expected to achieve DLIs just as its ACE/Emerging center to incentivize the scaling-up of enrollment of undergraduates (including enrollment of females); achieving international quality standards; introducing new academic programs; promoting project-based learning and innovative pedagogy; establishing new laboratories; enabling technology transfer and business/entrepreneurship; building linkages to business programs; and enhancing teaching and research capacity; and promoting institutional transformation in terms of policies and operations. This type of support did not exist under ACE I or ACE II.
  2. The renewal and new beneficiary institutions were selected through an open, rigorous, transparent and merit-based selection process. The selection process entailed the following main steps: (i) call for proposals to institutions; (ii) submission of Center of Excellence proposals through their respective governments to the Association of African Universities, the regional facilitation unit (105 proposals were submitted); and (iii) a systematic and detailed evaluation of proposals by 49 independent African and international experts according to pre-defined criteria. The evaluation consisted of three different and discrete sets of assessments including (a) desk reviews in which each proposal was reviewed by two experts in Accra, Ghana; (b) external evaluation in which each proposal was remotely assessed by a subject matter specialist, and (c) a site & leadership evaluation in which a team of experts visited shortlisted proposal sites to ascertain the readiness of the institutions in terms of governance, leadership, and infrastructure.
  1. The final selection of the centres was contingent upon: (i) the approval of the financing from the external financiers (World Bank and the French Development Agency (AFD)) and availability of sufficient financing for all the proposals; (ii) the selected universities incorporated the recommendations of the evaluators into their implementation plans, and (iii) the universities demonstrated sufficient capacity to manage the funds for their intended purpose. The selected centres depicted below (Table 3b) met all these conditions and subsequently got the approval from World Bank.
  1. The selected institutions under component 1 will implement their own ACE Impact project aiming to help address a specific regional development challenge through preparation of professionals (education), applied research and associated outreach activities to partners. Each ACE Impact centre will have an implementation team established to manage the project on a day-to-day basis. Each centre will be responsible for its own strategic and implementation plans, fiduciary and M&E activities. The team will be led by the centre director, who will be a recognized educator/researcher with expertise in the academic focus area of the centre. The centre director will be supported by a deputy director and faculty from all departments contributing to the centre.  Each centre team will also consist of key staff members specializing in procurement, FM, M&E, communications and an industry engagement who will support the centre’s day-to day operations and assist with fiduciary tasks. The host university will provide to the centres administrative support and assistance on the safeguards tools to be developed by the centres.
  1. The institutions will have the responsibility to implement their own institutional specific ACE Impact projects which encompass the following five broad elements:
    • (i) Enhance capacity to deliver regional high-quality training to address the development challenge.
    • (ii) Enhance capacity to deliver applied research to address the regional development challenge.
    • (iii) Build and use industry/sector partnerships to enhance impact of the Centre on development and increase relevance of the Centres education and research.
    • (iv) Build and strengthen regional and international academic partnerships to raise quality of education in other institutions in the region.
    • (v) Enhance governance and management to improve monitoring and evaluation, administration, fiduciary management, transparency, ability to generate resources, and project implementation.

 

  1. These five sets of project activities are closely intertwined. For instance, industry partnership and academic partnership are necessary inputs into enhanced capacity to deliver high quality training. On the other hand, high quality training is a key factor in successful industry and academic partnerships. The following discusses activities related to each of the five set of priorities in greater detail:
  • Enhance capacity to deliver regional high-quality training
  1. These activities aim to raise the capacity of the ACE Impact centres to form a cadre of professionals with cutting-edge conceptual and hands-on competences to address the development challenge of the centres. The three key indicators for measuring progress towards achieving the goal of delivering regional high-quality training will be: (a) Number of regional and national students enrolled in short-term specialized courses and in bachelor, master and PhD degree programmes; and (b) Number of education programmes under the centre of excellence that meet international quality benchmarks; and (c) externally generated revenue.
  1. This will be achieved by implementation of the institutional plan, designed by the institution and reviewed by external experts, to develop and strengthen academic programmes in the ACEs. The plan consists of an institutional specific mix of the following activities: (i) developing and offering specialized short-term education programes aimed at industry professionals for further development; (ii) developing and offering of specialized Master and PhD level programmes; increasing quality and relevance of existing teaching through revision of curricula and teaching-methods based upon industry professional standards; incentivize faculty for good performance, including incentives for research and awards for top teaching. Only non-monetary incentives to faculty to achieve the objective of the proposal can be funded by the ACE grant. The project does not restrict the use of other generated revenue; (iii) improvement of laboratories, classrooms, computers, and other teaching facilities through equipment purchases and limited civil works. Civil works will be limited to 25 percent of the expected costs of the ACE, and should only finance construction
  1. of rehabilitation of buildings and minor extensions of buildings; (iv) establishing international benchmarking and accreditation of education programs; (v) teaching-learning improvement programmes to upgrade teaching capacity and provide cutting-edge student-centred teaching; and (vi) upgrade faculty qualifications. Institutions are not constrained by the above list of suggestive activities. Other activities could be permissible for funding as laid out within the Project Regional Operations Manual.  Lastly, activities under research, industry/sector partnerships, academic partnerships, and governance and administrative strengthening, will equally contribute to strengthening of the Centres’ educational capacity.
  • Enhance Capacity to produce and communicate applied research at the regional level
  1. These activities aim to raise the capacity of the ACEs to conduct industry-relevant applied research. The key indicator for measuring progress towards achieving the related result will be Number of published research outputs and generation of revenue. This will be achieved by carrying out an institutional specific mix of the following activities: (a) Purchase and improvement of research facilities and research material; (b) Incentivize research and publications (non-monetary incentives as discussed above); (c) increase in Master and PhD students, including potential scholarship awards, if necessary, to attract young talent. The project strongly encourages ACEs to prioritize any scholarships for degree courses to young graduates over mid-career faculty members; (d) assistance in relevant trainings for staff and students, including grant proposal writing and publication preparations, such as in translation and editorial support; (e) participating in, and organizing of, conferences and seminars for presentation of research; (f) faculty exchanges with other research institutions, (g) access to resource material, include library material and access to e-journals; (h) costs associated with research collaboration; and (i) minor civil works to improve research facilities.
  • Regional and international academic partnerships
  1. Academic Partnerships serve to make the Centre of Excellence a nodal point that connects globally and disseminates regionally in West and Central Africa, and beyond. The ACE Impact projects have identified a record number of academic partners at the regional and international levels. The focus on strengthening such partnerships under this component will serve three main objectives: (i) increasing the capacity of partner institutions in the region to deliver quality education and conduct research; (ii) raising the Centres’ educational and research capacity through drawing upon partnership with international leading institutions within the same domain, and (iii) build upon the strengths of national and regional institutions –sharing of unique physical and faculty resources- to create synergies and thereby raise quality of education and research.
  1. The key indicators for measuring progress towards achieving the related result increased national and regional impact through institutional collaboration at the regional level will be as follows: (i) share of regional (non-national) students enrolled in ACEs and regional faculty, and (ii) regional research publications. Further, intermediate indicators will measure different aspects of the partnership agreements.
  1. The ACEs have partnered with institutions that have or need capacity to produce skills to address a particular development challenge. This includes similar international academic centres globally, universities in the region, and national and regional research institutions. In particular, collaboration with regional research institutions is critical within agriculture and health where substantial academic capacity is located outside universities in sector-specific research institution. The partnerships can be continuation of on-going partnerships and/or new partnerships.
  1. The academic partnership activities include: Collaboration in delivery of education programmes, faculty development programmes for regional faculty, joint conferences, joint research, sharing access to specialized research, learning equipment and library resources (giving students and faculty exposure to different learning environment and equipment), student and faculty exchange, joint organization of specific courses for example at the post-graduate level. Selected institutions will continue to revise and update the academic partnership action plan following the evaluation comments, including consideration of new partners.
  1. Academic partnership agreements should be developed by the ACEs in close collaboration with their partners. In the case of consortiums that form the ACE, a partnership agreement should be co-developed and co-signed by all major partners. These consortium type ACEs will include these agreements as part of the performance and funding contract to be signed with the Government. Funds for capacity building in partner institutions will be held and managed by the ACE Impact centre/institution leading the network/consortium. All fiduciary and M&E matters related to the use of these funds will fall under the purview of the ACE Impact centres. The academic partnership action plan will be reviewed and revised at mid-term.
  • Build and use regional and national industry/sector partnerships
  1. The key objective of these activities will be twofold: (a) provide skills and knowledge to address the development challenge (putting higher education to work), and (b) benefit the Centre of Excellence through improved relevance of the Centre’s teaching-learning and applied research. The key indicators for measuring progress towards achieving the related result are: Number of Students and Faculty with at least 1 month collaboration/internship in a company or a sector institution; and externally generated revenue.
  1. These objectives will be reached through partnering with industry/sectoral institutions, including companies and service delivery institutions that work to address the development challenge that the Centre is focused on. In this context, industry then should be interpreted broadly to include institutions that work in the economic sector of the development challenge, including for example public teaching hospitals for health and famer associations for agriculture, and not just private companies, such as manufacturing or mining companies. Also, these partnerships are both national and/or regional in nature. Partnerships with key national and regional industry associations or other important players are a strong indication of the potential relevance and impact of the ACE. In some ACEs, industry partnerships are also with lower-level industry/sector-specific training institutions, such as institutions that provide technicians education, midwifery education, or farmers’ extension service training.
  1. Each institution will implement its action plan for industry/sectoral partnerships (as designed in its proposal and subsequent revisions), one that is tailored to its specific development challenge, its existing industry partnerships, and new opportunities for partnerships. These activities could be a combination of: (a) industry-lectures; (b) master and PhD thesis based upon industrial research with companies; (c) advisory boards, (d) placement of students and fairs; industry-outreach cell to promote industry partnerships and liaise with industry. These industry partnership activities are closely linked with the education and research activities, in the sense that the partnership activities could include training of industry professionals, for example training-the-trainers programmes, and joint research. The main industry/sectoral partnerships will be defined in MoUs at the onset, and the plans will be updated at mid-term review.
  • Improving governance and administration of the institution and the ACEs
  1. The key indicator for measuring progress towards achieving the related result on Improved Governance of ACEs are: Improved institutional monitoring of fiduciary responsibility, notably, a functioning internal audit unit and a functioning audit committee in the Board of the Institution, timely unqualified audits, and procurement verification and progress reporting. Further, regularity and transparency of decision making and planning are two intermediate indicators.
  1. Activities to achieve strengthening governance and administrative capacity of the institution may include the following elements: (a) implementation of new and/or improved grants management, procurement, and monitoring procedures; (b) hiring or training of existing personnel for identifying grants opportunities, management, procurement, and monitoring; (c) hiring and training for fund raising; (d) improving board procedures – having regular meetings, strengthening the audit committee of the board, review board membership to include external members such as private sector representatives, and openly disclose board meeting minutes for greater transparency; (e) establishing internal evaluation procedures towards quality control; (f) supporting reporting on lessons-learnt in implementing the programs and making these available to regional bodies aggregating this information and partners.
  • Performance and Funding Contract and related financing parameters
  1. Each selected institution will sign a performance and funding contract with the government which states the grant is subject to the following few financial parameters: (i) At least 15 percent of the funding must be invested in the partnerships under a related partnership agreement(s), (ii) Up to 10 percent of the amount of funding will go towards the ACE host institution’s activities which will be included in the implementation plan and annual workplans of the ACE; (iii) civil works will be limited to 25 percent of the grant; (iv) the project cannot finance monetary incentives of faculty, administrative personnel or public employees; and (v) purchases of vehicles must be explicitly included in the approved annual workplan in order to be eligible and must not exceed one bus and one car per ACE Impact centre. The funding and performance agreement will also include the government’s indicative planned funding of institutional staff during the project.
  1. At mid-term, expected to be two years after signing the performance contract, there will be a thorough evaluation of performance. The grant amount to each ACE Impact centre and its usage will be reviewed, and can be adjusted. In particular, it is expected that ACEs that are behind in implementation will see their grant be reduced by 50% of the uncommitted amount that is above half of their grant. The additional funding would be made available to the institutions performing well. These reductions in grant amounts seek to reduce the risk of large committed funds to institutions that are slow in achieving implementation results.

b) 6Component 2: Fostering Regional Partnerships and Scholarships

  1. This component will focus on the Support to Emerging Centres of Excellence for networking, regional technical assistance and improving learning environment (Sub-component 2.1); and Support for PhD scholarships through the PASET Regional Scholarship & Innovation Fund (Sub-component 2.2). The aim is to expand the regional impact of the ACEs funded under Component 1 by providing demand-side funding for partnering institutions and regional students to purchase training and consulting services from the ACEs that are most relevant.

Sub-component 2.1: Support to Emerging Centres of Excellence for networking, regional technical assistance and improving learning environment

  1. Sub-component 2.1 will support five Emerging Centres of Excellence to develop regional institutional partnerships with ACEs (under Component 1) and other relevant international partners to strengthen the capacity of their higher education institutions. These Emerging Centres of Excellence will be in the form of a department/school or a multidisciplinary centre within an institution. Participating countries eligible for support under this sub-component are those that have not yet received support to establish ACE I centres, notably Djibouti (transport-logistics, supply chain management and ICT), Gambia (engineering), Guinea (mining), and Niger (mining, science education).
  1. The institutions being supported under this component will receive funding to strengthen, through partnerships, both undergraduate and postgraduate (focus is more on master’s level than PhD) education programmes that will provide training to their students and develop in them the skills which will be useful in addressing national development needs of the countries hosting the centres. Emerging centers to be established under this sub-component will receive support for activities including: regional technical assistance (TA) to strengthen academic programmes and curriculum design; faculty scholarships and training; costs of visiting faculty; TA for institutional policies and practices; improving teaching and research resources; and other regional engagements. The funding to these centers will also be based on DLIs (within similar broad seven DLI categories as is the case for the Component 1 ACEs).
  1. Although the Emerging Centres of Excellence were not selected competitively, these institutions, in conjunction with national higher education authorities, were required to submit strong proposals with specific strategic targets in order to receive financial support under this sub-component as Emerging centers. They were provided technical support to write quality and strong proposals. To strengthen the academic support base of these five centres they will each be mapped to the regional network of an ACE Impact center supported under Component 1, that is focusing on a similar thematic area.

Performance and Funding Contract and related financing parameters

  1. Each center’s available funds will be distributed across the relevant DLIs/DLRs. These centers will be expected to meet the same seven DLIs as ACE Impact centers, with a large share of the DLIs to incentivize results for improved undergraduate and master’s programs. Up to a capped amount will be disbursed against specific EEPs (salaries, scholarships and operating costs) in the annual budget of each center and its host institution, conditioned on the achievement of the specified DLIs. Each institution will sign a PFA with its government. These agreements will include requirements stipulating that: (i) At least 30 percent of funding for each center under this sub-component will be invested in regional partnerships (with new or renewal ACEs that have been selected to receive support under Component 1) and international institutional partnerships (with other institutions outside the ACEs and the region – especially for sectors for which no ACE Impact center exists). Funds can be used to cover regional TA to strengthen academic programs, curriculum design, institutional policies and practices; faculty scholarships and training; and costs of visiting faculty; and (ii) the remaining 70 percent of the funding will support investment in teaching, learning and research equipment and other hardware necessary for regional partnerships and supporting institutional transformation; (iii) Centers may allocate up to 25 percent of funding for civil works; (iv) the project cannot finance monetary incentives of faculty, administrative personnel or public employees; (v) Up to 10 percent of the amount of funding will go towards the ACE host institution’s activities which will be included in the implementation plan and annual workplans of the ACE; and (vi) purchases of vehicles must be explicitly included in the approved annual workplan in order to be eligible and must not exceed one bus and one car per ACE Impact centre. The funding and performance agreement will also include the government’s indicative planned funding of institutional staff during the project.

Sub-component 2.2: Support for PhD scholarships through the PASET Regional Scholarship & Innovation Fund

  1. Sub-component 2.2 will finance regional scholarships through the World Bank-financed Partnership for Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology – Regional Scholarship and Innovation Fund (PASET-RSIF) to support primarily the training of the next generation of faculty for higher education institutions in the region. The Fund aims to create, through PhD training, a critical mass of highly skilled African scientists and innovators in Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology (ASET) fields in priority economic sectors. This Sub-component 2.2 will build institutional capacity, to support improvements in the quality and quantity of academic staff in the region’s higher education institutions, ultimately increasing academic capacity of these institutions. Five countries (Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Senegal) have taken the lead in committing US$2 million each to a general Fund established by African governments in 2015. Several sub-Saharan African countries have expressed strong interest in contributing to the PASET-RSIF. Through ACE Impact, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Senegal, Nigeria and Benin plan to contribute to the PASET-RSIF.
  1. General Scholarship Management of the RSIF is the responsibility of the implementing entity of the Fund (the International Center of Insect Physiology and Ecology- icipe). This arrangement will include preparing scholarship application documents and managing the scholarship application process; developing and regularly update the RSIF operational manual; leading the selection process for host universities; preparing monthly progress reports and financial statements; and preparing, facilitating signing, and monitoring of the progress of agreements and MoUs with selected host and partner universities.

c)     Component 3: Enhancing National and Regional Level Project Facilitation and Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E)

Sub-component 3.1: Support for Project Facilitation and M&E at the Regional Level

  1. This component will focus on overall regional coordination and facilitation at the regional and national levels, including ensuring coordination between the ACEs, peer-learning, and ensuring measurement of, and reporting of, aggregated results. This component will also focus on supporting the participating governments’ higher education institutions to increase talent mobility, foster thematic networking and partnerships both among the ACEs, and between them and other relevant professional bodies.
  1. This sub-component will be financed through a Regional IDA Grant to the Association of African Universities (AAU) as the Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) of the ACE Impact Projects. The AAU will support: M&E activities such as development of an online M&E database platform, verification of results, benchmarking of ACE host universities, and graduate tracer studies; site supervision visits of ACEs by independent experts; communications, safeguards support, capacity-building; and knowledge-sharing and networking among ACEs and governments. The RFU will also liaise with ongoing regional and national initiatives in order to strengthen the ACE regional networks, including through digital networking platforms. The AAU will further provide technical assistance to regional bodies, including ECOWAS and UEMOA, to support regional policy making on regional higher education science and technology agenda, as well as activities required for regional project facilitation and steering.
  1. This sub-component aims to provide timely, sufficient, precise and reliable information for the measuring and reporting of aggregated results to improve and assess the performance of the selected institutions and the ACE Impact centres. The project activities will be:
  • Capacity Building activities for the ACEs. This could include training and capacity building within: education and project management, fiduciary training, and specific topics as per needs identified by ACE, for example grant proposal preparation, project sustainability, university board functioning, etc.
  • M&E: (i) Enhancing the M&E structures of ACEs and the RFU to facilitate regular and timely reporting on progress of ACE Impact activities; (ii) Workshops and Trainings for ACEs’ relevant staff to jointly develop and report on their results framework; (iii) third party evaluation and technical evaluations for the DLI and results reporting; (iv) other M&E activities including international evaluation groups, and baseline studies, graduate tracer studies, assessments and surveys as per need.
  • Support regional policy making through working with ECOWAS, and potentially other regional bodies, to prepare policy studies on regional student and labor mobility and other relevant higher education issues; and to build capacity for regional policy making within higher education, including training of staff.
  • The Facilitation activities that include organizing ACE Impact Bootcamp, biannual workshops and PSC Meetings to be held at various locations within the 11 participatiing countries, and supporting the national review committee meetings, including activities related to project management, staff, operating costs, per diem, communication, supervision and implementation visits to individual ACEs. The Facilitation activities also include organizing regular supervision/implementation review, workshops to discuss project implementation progress, lessons learnt and future ACE Impact activities.

Sub-component 3.2: National-level project facilitation

  1. Under Sub-component 3.2 activities in Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana and Nigeria will be coordinated by the national agencies responsible for tertiary education. The total allocation, including contingencies, will be US$5.5 million. This sub-component will finance project implementation support at the national level in the countries where the ACE Impact investments exceed US$20 million. These are the National Universities Commission (NUC) of Nigeria, National Council for Tertiary Education (NCTE) of Ghana, the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research in Cote d’Ivoire, and the Ministry of Higher Education, Research and Innovation (MESRSI) of Burkina Faso.

The NUC will setup a Project Implementation Unit (PIU-NUC) which will be responsible for the day-to-day operations in facilitating the ACE Impact project in Nigeria. The PIU-NUC will submit monthly reports to the Executive Secretary of NUC (as part of his overall oversight functions) and additional briefings during the bi-annual National Project Performance and Review meetings.  The PIU-NUC will consist of a National Project Coordinator, Procurement Specialists, Financial Specialists, M&E Specialists, Internal Auditor, Communication Officers, Safeguards Specialists and other supporting staff. In addition, the PIU-NUC can engage the services of an FM Consultant for a maximum of one year to streghten the capacity of the fiduciary team in the use of their accounting software and preparation of timely/quality financial reports. The PIU operational activities will be managed on a day-to-day basis by the PIU team. The PIU should be competitively selected or appointed based on merit/track record and following World Bank procurement procedures. Once in place, the key members of the team can only be replaced through a request for approval by the NUC. The request must be accompanied by a substantial justification for the replacement. The replacement must equally follow a merit-based selection process. The processes outline above will follow Bank regulations including no objections for the various stages for competitive selection as well as no objections for appointment for seconded positions.

  1. The PIU-NUC will be managing all other World Bank higher education projects. This will include the Sustainable Procurement, Environmental and Social Standards Enhancement Project (SPESSE) national higher education project. Given the synergies across the SPESSE and ACE Impact projects, the Head of the PIU-NUC will be responsible for both projects with dedicated project officers or deputies for each project, as necessary. This is to ensure there is strong coordination and leveraging of the two projects. Additionally, as necessary, and with a no objection from the World Bank, the PIU-NUC staff can work across both projects with clear terms of reference and staff costs can be shared across the two projects, as necessary.

  1. The MESRSI of Burkina Faso currently hosts the Project Implementation Unit (PIU) of its IDA-Funded national higher education project. This same MESRSI-PIU will play the national facilitator role for ACEs in Burkina Faso.
  1. The national facilitation units will provide national level support to the ACE Impact centres, within their respective countries. Performance of these national level facilitation agencies will be measured by the degree to which the ACE Impact centres in the respective countries achieve the project objectives including compliance with fiduciary, safeguard and anti-corruption guidelines. The activities will include supervision and training related to educational, research, implementation, fiduciary and safeguards aspects; as well as national M&E and minor TA.

Table 3a: Selected First ACE Impact Centres (Renewals, New and Emerging) by Country, Field and Development Challenge

Sub-Component 1.1: EXISTING AFRICA CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (Renewal centers)

1.

ACE: Training and Research in Water Science and Technology, Energy and the Environment in West and Central Africa (CEA-2iE)

Institut International d’Ingénierie de l’Eau et de l’Environnement (2iE)

Burkina Faso

Water, Energy and Environment

STEM

2.

ACE: Regional Water and Environmental Sanitation Center, Kumasi (RWESCK)

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST)

Ghana

Water & Environ. Sanitation

STEM

3.

ACE: West African Center for Cell Biology of Infectious Pathogens and Non-Communicable Diseases (WACCBIP-NCDS)

University of Ghana (UG)

Ghana

Cell Biology of Infectious & Non-Communi. Diseases

Health

4.

ACE: West African Center for Crop Improvement (WACCI)

University of Ghana (UG)

Ghana

Crop Improvement

Agric

5

ACE: Mathematics, Computer Science and ICT (MITIC)

University of Gaston Berger (UGB)

Senegal

Digital Development

STEM

6

ACE: Maternal and Infant Health (SAMEF)

Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD)

Senegal

Maternal & infant health

Health

Sub-Component 1.2: NEW AFRICA CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (New centers)

7

ACE: Training, Research and Expertise in Drug Sciences (CFOREM)

Université de Ouagadougou I (Ouaga I)

Burkina Faso

Pharmaceutical Science

Health

8

ACE: Bio-technological Innovation for the Elimination of Vector- Borne Diseases (CEA-ITECH-MTV)

Université Nazi Boni (UNB)

Burkina Faso

Biotech and Vector Transmitted Diseases

Health

9

ACE: Regional Transport Research and Education Center, Kumasi (TRECK)

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST)

Ghana

Transport

STEM

10

ACE: Regional Center for Energy and Environmental Sustainability (RCEES)

University of Energy & Natural Resources (UENR)

Ghana

Power

STEM

11

ACE: West African Center for Water, Irrigation and Sustainable Agriculture (WACWISA)

University of Development Studies (UDS)

Ghana

Water & Irrigation

STEM

12

ACE: Coastal Resilience (ACECoR)

University of Cape Coast (UCC)

Ghana

Coastal Resilience

STEM

13

ACE: West African Genetic Medicine Centre (WAGMC)

University of Ghana (UG)

Ghana

Genetic Medicine

Health

14

ACE: Prevention and Control of Communicable Diseases (CEA-PCMT)

Université Gamal Abdel Nasser de Conakry (UGANC)

Guinea

Communicable Diseases

Health

15

ACE: Environment and Health (CEA-AGIR)

Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD)

Senegal

Environment & Health

STEM

16

ACE: Agriculture for Food and Nutrition Security (CEA-AGRISAN)

Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD)

Senegal

Food Security & Nutrition

Agric

Sub-component 2.1: EMERGING CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (Emerging centers)

1

Emerging Center: Logistics and Transport (CELT)

Université de Djibouti (UD)

Djibouti

Transport – Logistics/ICT

STEM

2

Emerging Center: Mines and Societies (CEMS)

L’Institut Supérieur des Mines et Géologie de Boké (ISMGB)

Guinea

Mining

STEM

Add-on Support to Colleges of Engineering

1

College of Engineering

Institut International d’Ingénierie de l’Eau et de l’Environnement (2iE)

Burkina Faso

Energy, Civil Engineering

STEM

2

College of Engineering

Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, KNUST

Ghana

 

STEM

3

College of Engineering

University of  Djibouti

Djibouti

 

STEM

Table 3b: Selected Second ACE Impact II Centres (Renewals, New and Emerging) by Country, Field and Development Challenge

Sub-component 1.1: EXISTING AFRICA CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE THAT HAVE BEEN RENEWED (Renewal centers)

1.       1.

ACE: Mathematical Sciences, Computer Science and Applications

University of Abomey Calavi

Benin

Applied math & statistics

STEM

2.        

ACE: Mines and Mining Environment (CEA-MEM)

l’Institut National Polytechnique Félix Houphouët-Boigny (INP-HB)

Cote d’Ivoire

Mining

STEM

3.        

ACE: Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Agriculture (CCBAD)

Université Félix Houphouët-Boigny

Cote d’Ivoire

Climate change/ biodiversity

Agric.

4.        

ACE: Statistics and Quantitative Economics (ENSEA)

École Nationale Supérieure de Statistique et d’Economie Appliquée d’Abidjan

Cote d’Ivoire

Stats & quantitative economics

Socio/science

5.       9.

ACE: Genomics of Infectious Diseases (ACEGID)

Redeemer’s University

Nigeria

Genomics of infectious diseases

Health

6.       10.

ACE: Neglected Tropical Diseases and Forensic Biotechnology (ACENTDFB)

Ahmadu Bello University

Nigeria

Neglected tropical diseases

Health

7.       4

ACE: Reproductive Health Innovation (CERHI)

University of Benin

Nigeria

Reproductive Health

Health

8.       5

ACE: Dry Land Agriculture (CDA)

Bayero University, Kano

Nigeria

Dryland Agriculture

Agric

9.       6.

ACE: Food Technology and Research (CEFTER)

Benue State University

Nigeria

Food tech and research

Agric

10.     7

ACE: OAU ICT-DRIVEN KNOWLEDGE PARK (OAU-OAK)

Obafemi Awolowo University

Nigeria

Digital Development

STEM

11.     8.

ACE: Oilfield Chemicals Research (CEFOR)

University of Port Harcourt

Nigeria

Oil and gas

STEM

12.     9

ACE: Poultry Science (CERSA)

University of Lomé

Togo

Poultry science

Agric

Sub-component 1.2: NEW AFRICA CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (New centers)

13.     10

ACE: Water and Sanitation (C2EA)

University of Abomey Calavi

Benin

Water & sanitation

STEM

14.      

ACE: Valorization of Waste Products with High Value Added (VALOPRO)

l’Institut National Polytechnique Félix Houphouët-Boigny (INP-HB)

Cote d’Ivoire

Valorisation of waste

STEM

15.     11

ACE: Pastoral Productions – Meat, Milk, Leather and Skins (CERPP)

Université Abdou Moumouni

Niger

Livestock

Agric

16.     12

ACE: Public Health and Toxicological Research

University of Port Harcourt

Nigeria

Nursing

Health

17.     13

ACE: Centre for Population Health and Policy

Bayero University, Kano

Nigeria

Nursing

Health

18.     14

ACE: Covenant Applied Informatics and Communication

Covenant University

Nigeria

Digital Development

STEM

19.     15

ACE: Technology Enhanced Learning (ACETEL)

National Open University of Nigeria

Nigeria

Digital Development

STEM

20.     16

ACE: Innovative and Transformations Stem Education (CITSE)

Lagos State University

Nigeria

STEM Education

Education

21.     17

ACE: Mycotoxin and Food Safety

Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria

Nigeria

Mycotoxin and food safety

Health

22.      

ACE: Drug Research, Herbal Medicine Development and Regulatory Science

University of Lagos

Nigeria

Herbal medicine development and regulation

Health

23.      

ACE: New Pedagogy in Engineering Education (ACENPEE)

Ahmadu Belo University

Nigeria

Engineering education

STEM

24.      

ACE: Sustainable Power and Energy Development (ACE_SPED)

University of Nigeria Nsukka

Nigeria

Power

STEM

25.      

ACE: Future Energies and Electrochemical Systems

Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria

Nigeria

Renewable energy

STEM

26.      

ACE: Power Management (CERME)

University of Lomé

Togo

Power

STEM

27.     13

ACE: Sustainable Cities in Africa (DOUNEDON)

University of Lomé

Togo

Urban Design

Soc./ Econ Sci.

Sub-component 2.1: EMERGING CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE (Emerging centers)

1.       11

Emerging Center:  Innovative Teaching/Learning of Mathematics and the Sciences for SSA (CE-IEA-MS4SSA

Université Abdou Moumouni

Niger

Math & Science Education

Education

2.        

Emerging Center:  Mining Environment

EMIG

Niger

Mining

STEM

3.        

Emerging Center: Science, Technology and Engineering for Entrepreneurship

Gambia Technical Training Institute

The Gambia

Engineering/ Math & Science Education

STEM

Add-on: College of Engineering (CoEngg)

1.        

Collège of Engineering: Energy, Transport Infrastructures and Environment (CoE-EIE)

University of Abomey Calavi

Benin

Engineering

STEM

Note: The Côte d’Ivoire Renewal and New centers to be funded solely by AFD under a separate project are:

  1. ACE: Mining and Mining Environment (CEA-MEM) at the National Polytechnic Institute, – Houphouët-Boigny Côte d’Ivoire, (INP-HB)
  2. ACE: Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Agriculture (CCBAD) at the Félix Houphouët-Boigny University (UFHB)
  3. ACE: Statistics and Quantitative Economics at the National School of Statistics and Applied Economics (ENSEA)
  4. New Center: ACE: Valorization of Waste Products with High Value Added (VALOPRO) at the INP-HB.

INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE OPERATION OF THE ACE IMPACT PROJECT

a)     Key Roles and Responsibilities at the National Level

  1. The implementation of the ACE Impact Project at the national level rests essentially with the selected institutional centres of excellence. In this respect, each selected institution will implement its own Africa Centres of Excellence for Development Impact proposal. Further, administrative capacity, most often from the institutions’ central administration will assist with the fiduciary tasks. An ACE Impact team will be established, led by a Centre Leader (or Centre Director) who is a recognized educator/researcher within the primary discipline of the ACE Impact and supported by faculty from the relevant engaged departments. The Centre Leader is the key person responsible for project implementation at the university level. The Centre Leader is also firmly expected to be the budget responsible at the ACE Impact level. The Centre Leader has been assessed through an academic and governance assessment undertaken at the initial stages of proposal selection, which was an important element in the selection of the Centre of Excellence. As such, the Centre Leader can only be replaced through a request for approval by the National Agency in charge of higher education and processed through the representative of the government in the project steering committee or the government’s focal point for the project and with information to the World Bank[1] and AAU teams. The request must be accompanied by a substantial justification for replacing the Centre Leader. Lastly the proposed new Centre Leader must be adequately competent academically and managerially for assuming the critical role of being an ACE Impact Centre Leader.

  2. Each government will constitute a National Project Performance Review Committee through the ministry or agency responsible for higher education. It is tasked with a semi-annual review of performance and implementation support, including implementation planning (but with no day-to-day implementation or approvals). This committee will include members from Ministry of Finance, as well as relevant line ministries based on the focus area of the ACEs (e.g. agriculture, environment, health, oil and gas, etc.). In particular, relevant government agencies such as the Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Higher Education, Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Youth and Sports, and Ministry of Health, as well as national agencies responsible for higher education, will be represented in the National Project Performance and Review Committee, which will be headed by a national PSC Member or focal point appointed by the government of each participating country. Annex 1.a provides the Terms of Reference for the ACE Impact Project National Steering Committee.

 

  1. Fiduciary project implementation support and supervision at the national level will lie with an existing implementation unit responsible for the implementation of a related World Bank project in education, health, agriculture or the extractive industries. This avoids setting-up a new implementation unit, builds upon existing fiduciary capacity, and increases integration of the project within the Bank’s existing portfolio. Further, the regional facilitation unit (AAU) will fund training within fiduciary and safeguard issues as per needs.

b) Key Roles and Responsibilities at the Regional Level

1. Regional ACE Impact Project Steering Committee
  1. The ACE Impact Project Steering Committee will provide overall guidance and oversight for the project. During project preparation the ACE Impact Project Ministerial Steering Committee will make the final recommendation and selection of the ACEs following a technical evaluation by the Independent Evaluation Committee. During project implementation its main task will be to provide oversight and guidance on the project and direct ACEs to ensure the achievement of the project objectives. The Project Steering Committee includes representatives from each of the participating countries, recognized African and international academicians, sector representatives, and acknowledged civil society/private sector stakeholders. Annex 1b presents the Terms of Reference for the ACE Impact Project Steering Committee.

 

2.  Regional Facilitation Unit
  1. A Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) hosted by the Association of African Universities (AAU) will be responsible for sub-component 3.1. The AAU will be responsible for implementing sub-component 3.1 of the project, which entails supporting the aggregation of the M&E reports for the ACEs as well as capacity building on project management for the ACEs and capacity building within higher education. This includes managing the evaluation proposal, support to develop baselines, and as required consultancies for independent verification of results achieved. The RFU will provide these services to the new centres, renewal centres, emerging centres, and colleges/schools of engineering. The RFU will employ existing staff and resources in AAU and add specific required staffing, including an ACE Impact project manager that will be responsible for day-to-day project implementation. Annex 2 provides the Terms of Reference for the RFU.

  2. ECOWAS would provide the overall political backing and advice on promoting the regional specialization of the project. The project would also support policy studies and capacity building within ECOWAS to review policies for regional mobility of skilled labor and policy coordination within higher education.

 

3. Regional Coordination and Facilitation
  1. The ACE Impact Project will be implemented by the selected ACEs, with project facilitation and coordination support from the Regional Facilitation Unit (RFU) and technical assistance from selected consultants as necessary. The individual ACE is responsible for strategic planning and implementation of their institutional proposals, monitoring, evaluation and reporting. The ACEs will also be responsible for all fiduciary aspects required under World Bank guidelines for financial management, procurement[2] and, environment and social safeguards. The Regional Facilitation Unit is a regional body with at least 4 professional staff established in the secretariat that deal with Project coordination and facilitation, support to ACEs for monitoring and evaluation and various technical assistance as necessary. The project will operate under the overall guidance and oversight of a Project Steering Committee (PSC) whose main task is to set implementation guidelines, review results and progress, oversee the RFU and assist ACEs to ensure the achievement of the project objectives.

  2. Project implementation support and supervision at the national level would be undertaken by the National Project Performance and Review Committee. The fiduciary capacity available within higher education or related project would provide implementation support and possibly oversight for the ACE Impact Project. Further, the ACE Impact project would to the extent feasible, use the same fiduciary procedures as in the closely related project.

 

4. The Goal of the RFU
  1. Given the regional nature of the project, the project requires the RFU to coordinate and facilitate regional activities to the ACEs, partner institutions and be responsible for implementing regional activities for all countries participating in the project. The RFU will not implement or compete with the ACEs in implementation of the project, rather it will work in close collaboration with the ACEs to ensure smooth operation of the project and will support the implementation of project through:
    • facilitating the selection of the ACEs and other project preparation activities.
    • ensuring effective and efficient coordination and facilitation of regional project activities.
    • supporting the monitoring and evaluation needs of the selected ACEs as well as aggregated M&E needs of the overall project.
    • supporting the Project Steering Committee in delivering its tasks.
    • providing capacity building support and facilitating provision of technical support and thematic networking and partnerships on demand by the ACEs.
5. The Role of the RFU
  1. Specifically, the role of the RFU will be to support the ACE project through:
  2. Preparation Phase: The RFU will
    • Coordinate and facilitate the selection and evaluation process of the ACEs
    • Support preparation of MoUs for ACEs with partner institutions
    • Undertake baseline study for project results framework
    • Support the set-up of the project steering committee
  3. Implement sub-component 3.1 of the project, that is regional project coordination, monitoring and evaluation and provision of technical support and thematic networking and partnerships to ACE Impact countries. Tasks include:
    • Support the capacity building, knowledge sharing and coordination between the ACEs and partner institutions through joint lessons learning and capacity building events.
    • Serve as the facilitation secretariat between the different project stakeholders including supporting the coordination between the ACEs with concerned Ministries/ Departments of national Governments, the AFD and the World Bank.
    • Facilitate networking and partnerships among the ACEs in requested thematic areas.
    • Oversee the implementation of cross-cutting intervention tasks such as policy studies for regional mobility and other relevant tertiary education issues.
    • Organize two annual supervision missions.
    • Organize periodic meetings between ACEs and relevant stakeholders.
    • Produce ACE Impact Project Updates to stakeholders.
    • Coordinate and fund the activities of the PSC, including facilitating the bi-annual PSC meetings.
    • Support the provision of technical assistance to ACEs in thematic and other tertiary education areas as requested.
  4. Provide Monitoring and Evaluation support to the ACEs including:
    • Overall data collection for monitoring and evaluation.
    • Support in M&E activities including report updating.
    • Aggregating reports from all the ACEs into one.
    • Guide the operations of Monitoring and Evaluation Specialists in ACEs and Partner institutions through providing advice and operating as a support role for issues (problems and solutions) raised by ACEs and partner institutions.
    • Support the development of procedures for regular monitoring of performance of Project Institutions.
    • Conduct/ commission impact evaluation of training programmes and various types of other studies and disseminate the findings.
    • Publish on its website results of all national level selections, findings from monitoring and evaluation studies and such other information as required under the Disclosure Management Framework.

 

6. The Role of the ACEs
  1. As has been stated previously, the ACE Impact project consists of three components. Component 1 will aim to strengthen the capacity of selected institutions to establish Africa Centres of Excellence (ACE) and scale-up well-performing ACE I centres. Component 2 will support to Emerging centers of excellence for networking, regional technical assistance and improving learning environment, as well as support PhD scholarships through the PASET Regional Scholarship & Innovation Fund. These ACEs will deliver regional, demanded, quality training and applied research in partnerships with regional and international academic institutions and in partnership with industry. Component 3 consists of regional activities for the ACEs and their governments to build capacity, support project implementation, monitor and evaluate, and develop regional policies. Further, Component 3 will provide support for national level coordination (Nigeria, Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire and Burkina Faso) by the government-designated national higher education agencies.

  2. Funding and performance contract between the government and the University: This agreement will be signed on behalf of the government by the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry/Agency in charge of Higher Education and on the university side by the Head of Institution (Rector/Vice-Chancellor/President) and the ACE Impact Centre Leader. A template of this agreement will be provided for each country to consider and customize if found appropriate. This Funding and Performance contract has the following elements:
    • Upon project effectiveness – after signing of the above two agreements and any needed national approval.
    • The ACE will submit information to the National Performance and Review Committee regarding the achievement of the preparation and qualification results (DLI1 – Year 0). Further, the ACE will certify that it has the required background information in its archives to document the achievements of the results.
    • The Government through the National Performance and Review Committee will review and submit information to the World Bank with copy to the RFU (AAU) regarding the achievement of the preparation and qualification results (DLI 1 – Year 0). This information will be supplemented with expenditures in the Eligible Expenditure Programme (primarily salaries). This first disbursement is planned to amount to 10% of the agreed ACE Impact support.
    • The World Bank, and/or AFD, will disburse funds for Year 0 results (to a project account in MoF).
    • Ministry of Finance will transfer the funds using the regular budget process to the ACE account at the university level.
    • If additional funds are necessary for implementation, the government can request an advance from the second disbursement of up to an additional 10% of the support to each ACE. This will be an advance, and if results and eligible expenditures are not subsequently submitted to the World Bank, this advance will have to be refunded to the World Bank and/or AFD.
  3. For each subsequent yearly disbursement (2019 – 2023)
    • The ACE will compile the achieved results and certify that it has the required background information in its archives to document the achievements of the results.
    • The ACE, ACE Impact country PSC Member/focal point and the relevant Ministry of the Government through the National Performance and Review Committee will review the results and submit information regarding the achievement of the project results for that year (Year 1-4). The information to submit consists of two parts: (i) ACE results in the form of the DLIs, and (ii) Expenditures in the eligible expenditure program (EEP).
    • The Regional Facilitation Unit (AAU) will together with the World Bank verify achievements, sometimes on a sample basis, and The World Bank and/or AFD will disburse the agreed funds for that year’s results to the project account in MoF.
    • Ministry of Finance will transfer the funds using the regular budget process to the ACE account at the university level.
  4. Overall Communication Structure for the ACE Impact Project
  5. Given the regional nature of the project and the many stakeholders involved, the section below describes the proposed lines of communication for the ACE Impact project. Given the evolving nature of task teams, team members and positions may change during the lifetime of the project.
  6. The ACE Impact project involves:
    • 11 countries, each with the ACE Centre Leader, Focal Point and Steering Committee member.
    • Regional Facilitation Unit based at the Association of African Universities.
    • World Bank Task Team Leader (TTL) and Co Task Team Leaders (Co-TTLs) who are based in Washington DC and country offices.
    • AFD Task Team Leader (TTL) and Co Task Team Leaders (Co-TTLs) who are based in Paris and country offices
    • Financial Management Specialist and Procurement Specialist.
  7. As such the project communications channels include the following:
    • For all no-objections on the project, requests should be sent to the Co-TTL based in the country office with copy to the Regional TTL of the World Bank and AFD (in their focus countries).
    • For all communication to the Centre Leaders, the co-TTL, Regional TTL and focal point should be copied.
    • For all communication to Financial Management or Procurement Specialist, the copy should be made to the co-TTL and focal point.
    • For all regional no-objections from the RFU they should be sent directly to Regional TTL.
    • For all sector specific questions on improvement and work related to the sector, they should be sent to subject matter specialists responsible for those sectors with copy to the Regional TTL, Co-TTLs and AAU.
Table 4.a: ACE Impact AFD team contacts 

 

Pays

Bénin

Côte d’Ivoire

Nigéria

Point focal régional

Responsable

 

Lead Project officer

 

Jeanne Vanuxem Milleliri

vanuxem-millelirij@afd.fr

 

 

Project officer

Romeo Ayena

ayenar@afd.fr

Project officer

Lamine Keletigui

keletiguilamined@afd.fr

Lead Education Project officer

 

Celine Gratadour

gratadourc@afd.fr

 

Project officer

Victor Baysang

baysangmichelinv@afd.fr

 

Deputy Director AFD Abuja Agency

Virginie Diaz

diazv@afd.fr

Task Team Leader 

Quentin Delpech

delpechq@afd.fr

 

Table 4.b: ACE Impact World Bank team contacts and structure

 

Country

Education

Financial Management

Procurement

Safeguards

Nigeria

Dilip Parajuli

dparajuli@worldbank.org

Eliot Jolomi Dikoru edikoru@worldbank.org

Eucharia Nonye Osakwe eosakwe1@worldbank.org

Oyewole Oluyemi Afuye

oafuye@worldbank.org

Joseph Ese Akpokodje jakpokodje@worldbank.org

     (Taiwo)

Ghana

Eunice  Yaa Brimfah Ackwerh

edapaah@worldbank.org

Robert Degraft-Hanson rdegrafthanson@worldbank.org

Charles Ashongcashong@worldbank.org

Anita Takura

atakura@worldbank.org

Burkina Faso

Boubakar Lompo blompo@worldbank.org

Sandrine Egoue Ngasseu segouengasseu@worldbank.org  

Bourama Diaite

bdiaite@worldbank.org

Mohamed E. Hendah mhendah@worldbank.org

Leandre Yameogo lyameogo@worldbank.org

Benin

Hyacinthe Gbaye

hgbaye@worldbank.org

Tahirou Kalam

tkalam@worldbank.org

Mathias Gogohounga mgogohounga@worldbank.org

Joselyn Godonou

jgodonou@worldbank.org

Senegal

Hamoud Abdel Wedoud Kamil hkamil@worldbank.org

Fatou Fall Samba

fsamba@worldbank.org

Mamadou M. Mbaye

mmbaye1@worldbank.org

Medou Lo

mlo1@worldbank.org

Togo

Mouhamadou Moustapha Lo  mlo@worldbank.org

Tahirou Kalam

tkalam@worldbank.org

Kouami H. Messan kmessan@worldbank.org

Joselyn Godonou

jgodonou@worldbank.org

Gambia

Alison Marie Grimsland agrimsland@worldbank.org

Fatou Mbacke Dieng

fdieng1@worldbank.org

Haoussia Tchaoussala htchaoussala@worldbank.org

Ahmed Fall

afall2@worldbank.org

Guinea

Patrick Philippe Ramanantoanina pramanantoanina@worldbank.org  

Murielle Babatounde

mbabatounde@worldbank.org

Alpha Mamoudou Bah

abah2@worldbank.org

Emeran Serge Evouna emenangevouna@worldbank.org

(Mahamadou Maiga)

Niger

Pamela Mulet

pmulet@worldbank.org

Jean L Gbaguidi agbaguidi1@worldbank.org

Mahamadou B. Sissoko

msissoko1@worldbank.org

Bougadare Kone bkone@worldbank.org

Djibouti

Abdo Said Abdo aabdo@worldbank.org

Rock Jabbour

rjabbour@worldbank.org

Franck Bessette

fbessette@worldbank.org

Melance Ndikumasabo mndikumasabo@worldbank.org

Mohamed Adnene Bezzaouia

mbezzaouia@worldbank.org

Regional

Ekua Nuama Bentil ebentil@worldbank.org

Himdat Iqbal Bayusuf hbayusuf@worldbank.org

Graham Mark Harrison gharrison@worldbank.org

Maud Kouadio IV mkouadio@worldbank.org

Rim Wazni wrim@worldbank.org  Amani Osman aosman2@worldbank.org

Robert Degraft-Hanson rdegrafthanson@worldbank.org

Charles Ashong (1st ACE Impact)

cashong@worldbank.org

Oyewole Oluyemi Afuye (2nd ACE Impact)

oafuye@worldbank.org

Joseph Ese Akpokodje jakpokodje@worldbank.org

Olukayode O. Taiwo otaiwo@worldbank.org

Fabienne Prost

fprost@worldbank.org

 

[1] AFD should also be informed in countries where ACE Centers are financed or co-financed by AFD.

[2] In Cote d’Ivoire, Centers must adhere to the AFD Covenant on procurement.

MONITORING AND EVALUATION ARRANGEMENTS

a) Purpose and Objective        

  1. This section describes the monitoring and evaluation arrangements for the ACE Impact Project and explains its objective. The roles and responsibilities of the Regional Facilitating Unit (AAU), the ACEs, the ACE Impact Partner Institutions, and other key stakeholders, are also outlined.
  2. As a World Bank and AFD funded intervention, the ACE Impact Project emphasizes results-based management which focuses on tracking results and monitoring how these feed into achievement of project goals. Additionally, financing of the project is also linked to performance on agreed indicators. Monitoring and evaluation is therefore critical and will focus on assessing the extent to which implementation at all levels (the AAU, ACEs and their partner institutions) is consistent with agreed timelines and outcomes as set out in the project appraisal document (PAD). The data gathered will serve as a tool both for results-based planning of results, indicators, related activities and budgets, and tracking progress and achievements made under the project. In addition, it will support decisions on project implementation and improvement; demonstrate compliance with agreed procedures and plans; contribute to organizational learning and knowledge sharing through reporting and subsequent discussion and consideration of achievements and challenges; and provide information for stakeholders.

b) Scope of M&E Arrangements

  1. In line with the objectives above, the ACE Impact Project monitoring will cover Performance, Compliance; and Impact. Performance monitoring will determine whether activities and processes are being executed as per agreed schedules and help identify implementation challenges and improve project management. Compliance will be assessed based on whether grant conditions and project implementation guidelines including procurement and fiduciary conditions, are being followed. Impact will be measured based on the extent to which the ACE Impact Project is contributing to the achievement of the project development goals.
  2. Monitoring and evaluation will be carried out at all three levels of the ACE Impact Project implementation, which cascade one into the other. The levels which will be relevant for planning, managing and measuring the ACE Impact Project´s progress include: (i) The overarching project level which will involve on the one hand compiling and aggregating all data provided by each ACE and, planning, managing and reporting of global ACE Impact results – which is under the responsibility of the Regional Facilitation Unit (AAU); (ii) The project level for each of the separate ACEs – which is under the responsibility of each ACE (which will also report to the AAU), including the data provided to them by their Partner Institutions; (iii) the ACEs´ Partner Institution Level, which is planning, managing and measuring relevant data for the ACE level results frameworks (RFs) – which is under the responsibility of each partner institution, providing the data to their ACE.

c) Preparations for Monitoring and Evaluation

Developing the Results Framework

  1. To facilitate the M&E process, an overall Results Framework (RF) has been developed by the Bank in collaboration with the AAU and other key stakeholders, and with input from government and university representatives in the region. The RF details results indicators, unit of measure, baselines and cumulative targets for each of the 4 years of the project, the frequency of indicator measurement, data source/methodology, responsibility for the data collection and tracking for each indicator, and guidelines on M&E systems to set up. The RF will serve as the main reference for planning, managing and tracking progress, for   assessing   the   effectiveness   of   the   Project   during   implementation and measuring final outcomes at project completion.
  2. In addition to the three levels mentioned above, there is one more cascading level mainly serving for each ACE to plan, manage and measure Project implementation. Individual ACEs and the Regional Facilitating Unit (AAU) will be expected to develop their own specific results frameworks detailing the expected results, indicators and targets specifically tailored to their needs, based on the details of their individual projects in the project appraisal document.
  3. As the Regional Facilitating Unit (RFU), AAU will be responsible for coordinating and supporting the ACEs in implementing and monitoring their projects. Where necessary, local and international experts may be engaged. However, it must be emphasized that per the project documentation, primary responsibility for monitoring and evaluation lies with the ACEs.

 

Determining Scope of Monitoring and Evaluation

  1. Based on the Results Framework, individual ACEs and the RFU are expected to determine what monitoring and evaluation activities will be necessary and assess their institutional capacities for undertaking them. The ACEs are then expected to put in place the necessary tracking systems[1] (both automated and manual) and to designate persons to oversee and implement the M&E function[2]. Where necessary, ACEs may have to arrange additional training for their monitoring and evaluation staff or recruit staff with the requisite expertise. To facilitate the M&E process, ACEs will be expected to draw up in addition to the results frameworks, M&E plans to help plan and manage Monitoring and Evaluation activities over the four years of the project. The M&E Plan should detail what is being monitored (the type of information or data to be collected), how (the data collection methods to be employed), when (the frequency of data collection and reporting), by whom (the persons responsible for monitoring and evaluation, their specific capacities and assigned tasks) and for what reason (how the information gathered will support monitoring and project management).

d) Key Performance Indicators and Targets

  1. Based on the objectives of the ACE Impact Project, a number of indicators have been established to keep track of the performance of the Project as a whole. The indicators relate to regionality, training and research quality, research quantity, outreach, and administrative/governance quality.
  2. Each indicator is linked to a project development objective (PDO) and related base lines and target values. A baseline value represents the value of the indicator at the outset of, or, prior to implementation of the ACE Project. Target values provide a basis for monitoring, evaluating and reporting performance over time through the collection of trend data. Targets should be reviewed periodically and revised where necessary to ensure they are realistic, given current project conditions. The revised targets should be agreed with subject-matter experts, approved by the World Bank and/or AFD, and communicated to the RFU.
  3. The RFU (AAU) will collect, analyze and submit status reports to the World Bank and AFD on the performance of the indicators. Individual ACEs are therefore expected to collect and submit accurate data on the performance of each indicator in the agreed Results Framework to facilitate the RFU’s task. On a regular basis, data submitted will be subjected to a strict verification process by the RFU and independent consultants to confirm their validity.

e) Roles and Responsibilities

  1. The roles and responsibilities for the various levels and reporting requirements are outlined in the table below.

Table 5.1 : Roles and Responsibilities

Level

Roles & Responsibilities

Reporting Requirements

ACE Partner Institutions (PIs)

·        Responsible for M&E

·        Required to submit reports per schedules agreed with their respective ACEs

·        Project Leader to assign particular staff to track and collect specific data

·        PIs collect and submit data to the ACEs/Emerging Centres/ CoEngg per agreed schedules

ACEs/ Emerging Centre/ College of Engineering

·        Project Leader is responsible for overall M&E

·        Project Leader to assign staff to support tracking and collection of data; supervision and management of the project; liaison with the RFU and other parties; and quality control

·        Note that Institutional Impact results should be included in the designated Centers’ results

·        College of Engineering results should be submitted together with their designated Center’s results

·        ACEs will compile data from their PIs and their centres in the “status as of” column of the RF

·        ACEs will explain variances between expected and actual performance in the “comments” column. Unexpected outcomes will also be reported in the “comments” column

·        ACEs will also provide details on each indicator in designated templates. The details would be critical for verifying the results and determining payments for achievement of results

·        Results would be submitted bi-annually in October and April respectively.

RFU (AAU)

·        Project Manager will have primary responsibility for compiling and reporting M&E reports to the World Bank and AFD

·        The Project Manager will be supported by the M&E Officer and other RFU Staff designated to track specific indicators

·        The RFU collects, compiles and analyses data received from the ACEs and forwards this to the World Bank and AFD to inform grant management and disbursement decisions.

Table 5.2: Results Framework

Africa Higher Education Centres of Excellence Project

ACE Level Results Indicators

Core

Unit of Measure

Specifics

Baseline     (Nov. 2018’)

Annual Target Values

Frequency

Data Source/Methodology

Responsible for Data Collection

2019 Results

YR 1                   

YR 2                   

YR 3                   

YR 4                 

Improve the quality, quantity and development impact of postgraduate education in selected univs.

Indicator 1: Number of students (National and Regional) enrolled in specialized Master’s, PhD and short-term professional courses/ programs in the ACEs

 

Number (Indicator Definition: Count of national and non –national students in new ACE Courses)

Total number of enrolled students

     

Bi-annually

ACE enrolment records with information such as names, contact information, program of study, year in program, nationality, etc.                                                                                                                                         Aggregation of number of students obtained from program/course registrations and submitted to the RFU through the ACE Impact project online data submission portal

ACEs and RFU

 

Regional (Total)

      

Regional (Female)

      

National (Total)

      

National (Female)

      

Indicator 1b: Number of Regional students enrolled in specialized programs at ACEs

 

Number   
(Indicator Definition: Count of regional students in specialised  courses)

Total Regional students enrolled

     

Bi-annually

ACE enrolment records                                                                                                                                  Aggregation of number of students obtained from program/course registrations and submitted to the RFU through the ACE Impact project online data submission portal

ACEs and RFU

 

PhD Total

      

PhD Female

      

Masters Total

      

Masters Female

      

Bachelors/ Prof. (Total)

        

Bachelors/ Prof. (Female)

         

Indicator 2:Number of ACE programs and ACE hosting institutions that obtain international accreditation

 

Number                           (Indicator Definition: Count of relevant programs and institutions)

Total Int’l  Accreditations

         

Programs

     

Bi-annually

ACEs’ and their host institutions’ records of certificates and reports issued by the accreditation agencies

ACEs and RFU

 

Institutions

      

 Indicator 3: Share of ACE hosting institutions with a comprehensive strategic plan for regionalization                              (→ Outreach)

 

Percentage                  (Share ofrelevant ACE host institutions)

      

Bi-annually

   

Indicator 4: Number of ACEs that have had substantial development impact

 

Number                           (Indicator Definition: Count of relevant ACEs)

          

Indicator 5: Number of students and faculty participating in internships/apprenticeships in relevant industry/ institution

 

Number         (Indicator Definition: Count of students or faculty with participating in internship in relevant industry or institution

          

INTERMEDIATE RESULTS

Establishing New and Scaling up Well-performing Africa Centers of Excellence for Development Impact

Indicator 6: Number of revamped or newly designed programs (Master’s, PhD and Professional Short Courses)

 

Number         (Indicator Definition: Count of revamped/newly designed programs

      

Annually

Programme Records

 

 

Indicator 7: Number of ACEs with female centre leaders

 

Number         (Indicator Definition: Count of ACEs with female centre leaders

        

 

 
        

 

 

Indicator 8: Number of ACE related research publications in internationally recognized peer reviewed journals

 

Number          (Indicator Definition: # of ACE related research publications in internationally recognised peer reviewed journals)

      

Bi-annually

International bibliometric databases, as compiled by Elsevier

 

 

Indicator 9: Number of new nationally or regionally accredited programs

 

Number                           (Indicator Definition: Count of relevant programs)

Total national/ regional programs accreditation

       

 

 

National

       

 

 

Regional

       

 

 

Indicator 10:  Amount in externally generated revenue by the ACEs 

 

US Dollars    (Indicator Definition: Amount of US Dollars  generated from outside ACE

      

Bi-annually

ACE Financial Statement

 

 

Indicator 11: Number of faculty and students participating in academic exchanges

 

Number         (Indicator Definition: Count of faculty and students on academic exchange)

Total number of academic exchanges

     

Bi-annually

Record of staff trained                                                                                         Report on relevant training sessions

  

Faculty

      

Students

      

Indicator 12: Number of graduates employed within 6 months of graduation

 

Number         (Indicator Definition: Count of students employed within 6 months of graduation)

Total number of students employed within 6 months of graduation

     

Bi-annually

Analysis of project records on students per semester

 

 

Regional (Total)

      

Regional (Female)

      

National (Total)

      

National (Female)

      

Indicator 13: Share of well-functioning regional networks led by ACEs

 

Percentage      (Indicator Definition: Share of well-functioning networks led by ACEs)

 

       

 

 

Indicator 14: Number of ACE hosting universities participating in the regional benchmarking initiative that submit complete data on at least 85% of the indicators

 

Number         (Indicator Definition: Count of ACE host universities under benchmarking initiative that submit data on 85% of DLIs)

 

       

 

 

Enhancing Regional Policymaking, Monitoring, and Facilitation

 

Indicator 15: Level of satisfaction of the ACEs and the Steering Committee on the support given by the RFU

          

 

 

Indicator 16: Number of regional higher education policies developed and discussed with participating governments

 

Number         (Indicator Definition: Count of Regional higher education policies developed and dicussed with ACE governments)

          

Indicator 17: Number of ACEs and emerging centers reporting to the RFU on at least 85% of the ACE Impact project indicators on time

 

Number         (Indicator Definition: Count of Regional higher education policies developed and dicussed with ACE governments)

          

 

[1] Some guidelines have been provided in the Results Framework on what tracking systems are needed. Essentially, the guidelines point out what information would need to be collected, what strategies or systems (such as databases) would need to be put in place and other related issues.

[2] While the Project Centre Leaders will have general oversight of the monitoring and evaluation at each centre, it is important that the Centre Leader will, with regard to each of the indicators, designate particular project staff to track and collect data. These persons should be able to provide the RFU and the WB (where necessary), with all information pertaining to the specific indicator they are in charge of. The full names, positions and contact details (email and telephone) should be provided in the appropriate column of the results framework. 

VERIFICATION OF DISBURSEMENT LINKED RESULTS

  1. This chapter is an addendum to the preceding chapter on monitoring and evaluation, and clearly outlines the procedures for verifying the individual disbursement linked results (DLRs). Verification is carried out annually and requires the ACEs to submit their results framework that includes progress and achievement of the DLIs for the time-period being verified. The results should be accompanied by supporting data captured in the verification data sheets for the disbursement linked indicators 1 through to 7 (as illustrated in the RFU Monitoring and Evaluation digital system http://ace-impact.AAU.org ). The reports will be reviewed in the first instance by the RFU and comments for fine-tuning, including requests to provide missing data and ensure the details provided correspond with the results reported, will be shared with the ACEs. Once the reports are finalized, the verification process for various DLRs is initiated.
  1. Generally, when verification is completed, the RFU will issue verification letters to the World Bank and/or aFD with copies to the centres concerned. The letters will detail the results achieved and the corresponding amounts earned in Special Drawing Rights (SDR) or Euros (EUR).

Based on the letters, the World Bank and/or AFD authorizes disbursement.

  1. For World Bank disbursements, the centres make payment requests via the World Bank’s Client Connection platform; and the Bank disburses the funds earned in US Dollars (USD). Each disbursement from the World Bank will reimburse the country for EEPs in the amount determined by the DLRs. Centres are therefore required to submit their EEPs as part of their Interim Financial Reports (IFRs) to the RFU.
  1. For AFD disbursements, the centres make payment requests in accordance with the stipulations of the respective financing agreements of the countries (Nigeria, Benin and Côte d’Ivoire) which specify the modalities for the disbursement of funds.

Verification Schedule

  1. The schedule for verification differs for the different categories of results. The RFU would usually prompt centres on the submission of reports for verification and the initiation of verification exercises. For some results, the Centres are responsible for notifying the RFU on achievement and requesting for their verification. Refer to Table 6 below on the verification Protocol for specifics on the individual DLRs.

Results verification during COVID – 19

  1. Due to the limitations imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, centers are facing several challenges in the recruitment of students, especially, regional students and delivering in-person classes. Travel restrictions have also affected how verification of civil works and large equipment will be undertaken. Therefore, following endorsement from the PSC, the project verification processes has been expanded to include updates on verification protocols and schedules.
  1. To adapt to the COVID-19 context, three principal adjustments have been made: (i) expension of online students; (ii) flexibility on regional students rules and (iii) update on the verification requirements and schedules. The project will review the impact of these adjusments at Mid Term Review, including possible extension to ensure all project objectives are met by end of the project. See Table 6 and Annex 3 for further details on the COVID-19 adjuments.
  2. Expension on the verification protocol for virtual/online students. With the closing of most universities, holding physical training and classes has been quasi-impossible and most centers used various online channels to continue classes. Given such context, centers can recruit online and virtual PhD, Masters and Short-course students under the project:
    • Online students are students fully attending class virtually and are different from in-person students currently attending class virtually due to COVID-19
    • Online students are counted at 50 percent of the value of in-person students.
    • Students who were registered on a regular face to face or blended training that are studying through virtual mechanism due to the COVID-19 pandemic are still counted at the full DLI cost
  1. Flexibility on the Regionality (Regional students) rules. The COVID-19 pandemic affected the recruitment of regional students in the centers. Considering this context, verification rules on regionality will be waived for calendar year 2020:
    • Minimum of 20 to 30 percent of students are regional for full disbursements on national students (1 regional for 4 nationals) will not be apply for January to December 2020 enrollments;
    • Regionality flexibility will be waived up to number of students projected for year 2 per student category in DLI table;
    • Beyond the year 2 projections, regionality rules will be applied to national students submitted; and
    • Ceilings fixed per DLR remain the ultimate restricting factor
  •  
  1. Update on the verification requirements and schedules. Centers experienced significant delays in their regular operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, verifications process of various DLRs have been adjusted to adapt to the current context:
    • Students verification schedule: Given that the academic year in some countries have not yet start and will not until January 2021, the project will consider depending on the volume and trends of results submitted by the centers:
      • Reducing Student enrollment time eligibility from 6 to 4 months
      • Organizing two rounds of student’s verification in 2021
        1. Regular verification in January 2021
        2. Review and explore a second round in 2021 depending on trends and need of the centers
    • Milestones verifications (DLRs 4.3 and 7.5): With the current country travel restrictions, the project will consider:
      • As much as possible online and virtual verificatio
      • Explore using country-based experts for onsite verification of civil works/large equipment
      •  

Centers also have the opportunity to make adjustments to their planned activities through their annual workplans. Activities eligible as part of the COVID-19 could be classify under the following categories (See annex 5 for list of activities):

  • Contracts for research related to COVID-19
  • Sales from innovative products developed by the centers to respond to a development challenge. e.g. solar-powered handwashing stations with hand-sanitizer/soap dispensers.

Table 6: DLI Verification Protocol

Disbursement Linked Results (DLR)

Actions to be completed /Documents to be submitted

Additional Information to have readily available for potential verification

DLI 1    Institutional readiness

 

DLR# 1.1: Basic Readiness

§  Financing Agreement is effective

§  The RFU has approved of the center’s Implementation Plan and the Procurement and Financial Management Manuals. 

§  Official designation of the core team members (Center leader, Deputy Center leader, FM responsible, procurement responsible, M&E responsible and sectoral liaison).

§  The Center has designated a non-staff student representative to the RFU.

The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$300,000 equivalent to US$450,000 equivalent per milestone. The country specific value is in the Financing Agreement.

§  ACE implementation plan

§  ACE annual work plan for the first year

§  Financial Management and procurement procedures

§  Details and contacts of core team members

DLR# 1.2: Full Readiness

§  Project Management certification for at least one leading team member;

§  Functional center website (a link to the center’s website);

§  Student handbook on the website with policies for sexual harassment and scholarships;

§  Sectoral Advisory Board (SAB) constituted and its endorsement of the Implementation Plan.

The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$300,000 equivalent to US$450,000 equivalent per milestone. The country specific value is in the Financing Agreement.

§  Project Management certificate

§  Website address/ link

§  Minutes of the SAB meeting that endorsed Implementation Plan

DLI 2     Development Impact of ACE Center

DLR#2: Independent, external evaluation of the development impact of the center

·        Independent, external evaluation of the development impact of the ACE center conducted during Year 3 (Year 2 for renewals) and end of Year 4 of project implementation. 

·        External evaluators assess and score development impact of the center.

·        In Year 3, score is based upon progress towards development impact.

·        In Year 4, score is based upon development impact. The criteria for evaluation will include

(i)     Relevance and impact of graduates on society, including the share of graduates hired in the target sector and feedback from key employers;

(ii)   relevance and impact of research on society;

(iii)  progress on DLIs;

(iv)  SAB annual reports; and

(v)    interviews with center graduates and sectoral stakeholders.

The value of this DLI varies between countries from US$25,000 equivalent to US$35,000 equivalent per point in the score (point scale 1 to 5). The country specific value is in the Financing Agreement.

§  Interview transcripts

§  Evaluation report

DLI 3 Quantity of Students with Focus on Gender and Regionalization

DLR#3.1: New PhD students

DLR#3.2: New Master students

DLR#3.3: New Prof. short courses

DLR#3.4: New 1st Degree students

·        Table with the new students in courses under the ACE, over and above those reported previously. Eligible new students in degree programs (PhD, Master and Bachelor) must have completed their first semester. Note that first degree/ bachelor students are eligible only for Emerging Centres and Colleges of Engineering. The number of new students should be reported by level of course (PhD, Master, Short course and Bachelors), by nationality (national, non-national African, and international), and by gender.

·        For PhD students, a summary list of the enrollment status of the previous-reported students must be provided, along with a certification that the enrolled PhD students are all actively pursuing the degree.

The value of this DLR is as follows:

 

PhD

Masters

Short-course Professional

Bachelor/ 1st Degree

National Male

$10,000

$2,000

$400

$1,000

National Female

$12,500

$2,500

$500

$1,500

Regional Male

$12,500

$4,000

$800

N/A

Regional Female

$15,600

$5,000

$1,000

N/A

·        List of names and contact details (email & telephone) for each reported student.

For DLR # 3.1 & 3.2   Regionality rules adjusted for 2020 calendar year (subject to regular reviews)[1]

·        Virtual students counted at 50%

·        Regional criteria (30% regional students) waived for Jan – Dec 2020 enrollment

·        Up to number of students projected per student category in DLI table for year 2

·        20% Regional rules applied back to beyond year 2 projections

·        Maximum per DLR still holds (ultimate restricing factor)

For DLR#3.3, group photographs, training curricula, reports, evaluation survey instrument and report must also be provided

·        In case of online short course verification (part of Covid-19 Pandemic adjustment). The verification would consider:

·       Completed DLR 3.1 – 3.4 template (provide details for only short course students)

·       Participation list from the Meeting App for each day of the training (see in foot notes guidelines on how to obtain this from various meeting applications). Please ensure participants sign in with the official names they registered with to facilitate reconciliation

·       Curricula for the Professional Short Course

o   Links to recording of each day’s session

·       Results of survey administered to participants (should include a copy of the survey instrument)

DLI 4 Quality of Education and Research through Regionalization

DLR#4.1: No. of internationally (regionally/sub-regionally) accredited education programs

§  ACE to report all programme accreditations achieved over the period under review with details on programme title; level (PhD, Masters, Bachelor’s); type, date and expiry of accreditation; name and contacts of accrediting agency/ institution.

§  Also, information must be provided on the type of accreditation undertaken (Gap assessment certified /undertaken by an external accreditation agency; Self-evaluation undertaken following satisfactory international standards (agreed as part of the performance agreement); Regional (WAHO/CAMES); Sub-regional or National Accreditation or ISO; Bologna Compliant programs (details to be specified)

§  Center to show evidence (copy of certificate, accreditation letter and or report, email confirmation) of achievement of the specific accreditation or assessment

 

The value of this DLR is US$500,000 per program internationally accredited; US$100,000 per program nationally/regionally accredited; US$100,000 per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken; US$50,000 for new/revamped courses meeting international standards 

 

·        Accreditation letter/ certificate and link to same on project website

DLR#4.2: No. of internationally recognized centre relevant research publications

§  Centre submits a list of research publications produced over the period under review including details on references, abstract and ACE affiliated authors.

§  The list should indicate which of the authors are affiliated to the ACE in question

The value of this DLR is US$10,000 per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners; US$15,000 per article co-authored with regional partners.    

·        Contacts of students undertaking internships

·        Contacts of companies/sector associations hosting students

DLR#4.3: Improved teaching and research environment as per approved proposal (institutional specific annual milestones specified in the performance and funding agreement)

·        The Implementation plan for each ACE will clearly describe between 3 to 5 annual main milestones for improving its teaching and research environment based upon the specific activities to be undertaken by the centre.  Additional documentation required to prove the achievement of each milestone will be detailed. This could for example be: signed contract for rehabilitation, signed contract for delivery of specified lab or learning equipment; halfway or completed rehabilitation; delivered and installed labs, learning equipment or furniture and evidence of equipment usage by students and researchers. 

·        Each ACE will have differing milestones; however, they are a set of common milestones such as:

1.      Signing of building, evidence includes (i) signed copy of contract with bill of qualities (ii) certificate that ESMP adhered to (iii) relevant procurement procedures from agreed PM has been followed (iii) description o. In addition, the x percent in milestone 2 is agreed in the initial contract. Building contract has to be on the ACE website

2.      X percent completion of building, evidence includes (i) certification of x percent completion of construction by an architect/engineer acceptable to The Bank. The engineer/architect will be independent and hired by AAU to verify the progress (ii) photos to certify completion of construction and uploaded on ACE website

3.      Laboratory equipment purchased or supplied contract signed/invoice with certification of procurement, relevant procurement documents are available for post-procurement audits. Equipment contract is shared on ACE website

4.      100 percent completion of building and 100% of equipment installed and in-use by faculty and students. Evidence includes photos and checklist of all equipment contracted with a status and location of purchased equipment. All equipment has to be entered into asset catalogue of the university.

The value of this DLR is US$300,000 per milestone

·        Centre will share link to contracts, evidence of adherence to fiduciary requirements, pictorial evidence of completion of construction, rehabilitation and equipment usage, on their website 

DLI 5 Relevance of Education and Research

DLR#5.1: Amount of externally generated revenue by the ACEs as paid into the designated ACE-Programme account

·        A designated account must be set up for the ACE Project. The financial statement should be in relation to the designated project account.

·        The ACE designated account must be audited

·        Externally generated funds from other donors/development partners is capped at 50% of the maximum to be disbursed

·        Eligible sources of revenue include tuition fees, other student fees, joint research, research consultancies, fund raising and competitive grants (from governments and development partners) or other external sources

The value of this DLR is US$1 for each US$1 generated from national, or international non-firm sources; US$2 for each US$ 1 generated from regional or from private/ sectoral sources; 

 

·        Evidence of revenue generated (bank transfers etc. of externally raised funds) with details on amount in the original currency, date of receipt, source name, contacts and type (national or international non-firm/ regional or private/ sectoral), details of account in which funds are lodged,

DLR#5.2:  No. of Students /faculty with at least 1-month internship in relevant industry/ sector-relevant institutions (by country/region).

·        Tables with students who have undertaken internships of at least 1 month during the period under review

·        Staff on sabbatical with a relevant stakeholder can count towards the internship DLR

·        Eligible host institutions include private companies, ministries and public utilities

·        Placements at research institutes and universities do not count towards the internship DLR.

The value of this DLR is US$1,000 per period in country and US$1,500 per period in region 

§  Centre to provide details on student names and type (PhD or masters), contact details, name, contacts and status (public/private) and type (regional/national) of the host-institution, qualifications or credits earned, etc.

DLR#5.3:

·        The Implementation plan for each ACE will clearly describe the main milestones for promoting entrepreneurship, innovation, start-up companies, and/or technology transfer/commercialization support.  In the Implementation Plan, the specific activities to be undertaken by the centre should be identified.  Additional documentation required to prove the achievement of each milestone will be detailed. This could for example include: 

1.      Creation of a technology transfer office 

2.      Rent by 10 new startups in an incubation center

3.      Patents earned by Center faculty and students

4.      Establishing an entrepreneurship curriculum/certificate/center on campus

The value of this DLR is US$100,000 for each milestone

§  Centre will share links to documentary and pictorial evidence of achievement of the milestones on their +website 

DLI 6 Timeliness and Quality of Fiduciary Reporting

DLR#6.1:  Timely financial reporting for the ACE account, including timely submissions of Interim Financial Reports (IFRs) and of audit reports for the period

·        Timely financial reporting and submissions means the requisite financial and procurement reports are submitted by the relevant deadline as indicated by the RFU

·        The financial reporting consists of the external financial and procurement audits due 6 months after the financial year (calendar year for all the countries participating) and the Interim Financial Report (IFR). The IFR is due every semester on February 15 (for the period July-December of the previous year) and August 15 (for the period January – June of the same year).

The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$15,000 equivalent to US$25,000 equivalent per year.

 

DLR#6.2: Functioning internal audit unit  and functioning audit committee (under the university’s council) that would support the center and the ACE Impact host university

For the first withdrawal application requesting funding for this result:

·        Guidelines/ ToRs for the audit committee constituted under the governing body of the university

·        Members of the audit committee

·        Evidence (report or minutes of meeting) that the Committee has met and discussed the audit for the ACE, the committee’s role in the project, and risks associated with the project.

For subsequent withdrawal applications:

·        Evidence (report or minutes of meeting) that the Committee has met and discussed the external audit for the ACE, any internal audit reports, and following up on issues raised to ensure management’s attention and correction.

·        If changes to the Guidelines / ToRs have been made, the revised ToRs or Guidelines should be included.

Note, the Audit committee should in principle carry out an institutional review of the audits and follow-up. However, the term functioning will be interpreted only regarding review of the ACE part of the university.

The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$15,000 equivalent to US$25,000 equivalent per year.

 

DLR#6.3:  Web T/ransparency on Fi

]duciary reports for {?LO<M&tn6rbsthe center and the ACE Impact host university

A link to the institutional website where the following project reports are publicly available:

§  All external audit reports for the project, all interim financial reports, the past year’s and the current budget, as well as the current annual work-plan

§  The trail of webpages (breadcrumb trail) from the institutional home page to the page with the above reports (institutional Home page > Section page > Subsection page > etc.)

The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$15,000 equivalent to US$25,000 equivalent per year.

`1QST5Y6[-0P

9]

DLR#6.4:  Quality of procurement planning. Share (%) of the originally approved procurement plan that was executed

Timeliness of procurement progress (25% of all procurement contracted by year 1; 55% by year 2, and 100% by year 3, and verification of installation by year 4).  Procurement progress report with evidence of contracts signed.

The value of this DLR varies between countries from US$15,000 equivalent to US$25,000 equivalent per year.

Link to documentary and other evidence of procurement progress on the centre website

DLI 7 Institutional Impact

·        For each ACE Impact Center, DLI 7 is focused on Institutional Impact.   

·        The development and implementation of the workplan for Institutional Impact for each university should be led by the institutional leadership (including, for example the Vice Chancellor or Rector).   

·        For those institutions that host more than one ACE Impact Center, no activities may result in more than one Center earning a DLR under DLR 7 for a single activity.   The RFU is responsible for ensuring the coordination necessary in delineating specific activities and DLRs between the different Centers. 

·        In order to achieve DLRs, the institution must develop a plan for approval by the RFU.   

·        Because each institution is different, and has different goals for institutional impact, the specific workplan for achieving this DLI may be different. 

·        Institutions may pursue specific DLRs as described in DLR 7.1 – DLR 7.4.  In addition, institutions may identify appropriate activities and milestones for institutional impact under DLR 7.5. 

For those institutions that host more than one ACE Impact Center,it is anticipate that several milestones for institutional impact will be identified under DLR 7.5. 

• DLR#7.1: ACE Impact host institution develops and endorses a meaningful university- wide regional strategy (including student affairs).

The strategy will include policies and interventions that would ensure that the institution becomes regionally competitive (if not globally), highlighting, for example, how to attract and retain more regional students and partners (both from industry and academia).

 

 

The value of this DLR is US$100,000

·        Copy of Regional Strategy, and link to same on university website 

§  Documentary evidence indicating approval of strategy through appropriate university channels 

DLR#7.2: ACE Impact host institution undertakes open, merit-based competitive selection of department heads related to the ACEs and university head.

§  Centre submits evidence that department heads/deans related to the ACEs and university head are recruited through open, merit-based competitive selection

The value of this DLR is US$200,000 for university head recruitment and US$50,000 for dean/department heads

§  Links to online vacancy announcement

§  Interview reports and scores

• DLR#7.3: ACE Impact host institution undertakes institutional wide international accreditation, gap assessments and self-evaluations

§  ACE to report all institutional accreditations achieved over the period under review with details on type, date and expiry of accreditation; name and contacts of accrediting agency/ institution.

§  Also, information must be provided on the type of accreditation undertaken (Gap assessment certified /undertaken by an external accreditation agency; Self-evaluation undertaken following satisfactory international standards (agreed as part of the performance agreement); Regional (WAHO/CAMES);

§  Center to show evidence (copy of certificate, accreditation letter and or report, email confirmation) of achievement of the specific accreditation or assessment

The value of this DLR is US$ 200,000 for international accreditation; US$75,000 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation

§  Accreditation certificates/report, including link to same on university website

§  Gap Assessment or Self-evaluation reports

§  Other relevant assessment reports

DLR#7.4: ACE Impact host institution participates in the PASET Regional Benchmarking initiative

§  Host institutions submit complete data on at least more than 85% of the required indicators. Based on results, the host institution submits intervention plan to improve performance.

§  Centre confirms the participation of the ACE Impact host institution in the benchmarking exercise and its submission of an acceptable intervention plan.

 

 

The value of this DLR is US$ 50,000 for each year the university participates (up to  2 years).

·        PASET Benchmarking Report

DLR#7.5:  Milestones for Institutional Impact as per approved proposal (institutional specific annual milestones specified in the performance and funding agreement) 

§  The Implementation plan for each ACE will clearly describe main milestones for Institutional Impact.  Additional documentation required to prove the achievement of each milestone will be detailed. This could for include:  Board approval for new policies and procedures; contracts for enhanced MIS systems; documentation on the establishment of new administrative units; launch of a Career Center; launch and achievement of fundraising goal in a capital campaign.  

§  Milestones for Institutional Impact must be approved by the RFU as part of the Implementation Plan. 

§  Minutes of Board meetings 

§  Signed contracts for enhanced systems 

DLR# 7.6: Milestones for Enhanced Digital Infrastructure and Networking Capacity (Unique to Nigeria)

Only Applicable to Nigerian Centers

·        ACE institutions meets prefomulated and approved milestones in their participation in the NREN services and results show clear evidence that students and faculty are receiving improved access to the services (as formulated by each institution). This could for include;  atleast 0.5 gbps broadband connection, (2) acess to electronic library/database content, (3) acess to high performance computing, and (4) acess to high – perfomance computer applications

The value of this DLR is  US$ 100,000 for year for a signle or bundle services

·        Assessement Reports

·        University reports

[1] COVID 19 related adjustments are subject to regular reviews

  1. ZOOM: How do I export a participant list from Zoom?On the Zoom portal, click Reports on the left panel and click Usage. Choose the time range and click Search and it will bring up a list of past meetings. From the meeting you look for, click on the number of participants. You can generate an CVS file of the list by clicking the Export
  2. WEBEX: To generate a participant attention report, go to My Webex > My Reports, and then select Attendance Report located under the Webex Events heading. Enter the Event ID and click Export Detail Report.
  3. MS Teams: Meeting attendance list can be downloaded but only during a meeting. This facility is not available after the meeting ends. This is released for general availability. Please note this feature is turned off by default and needs to be enabled via admin policy.
  4. Google Meet (Hangout): Checking details about attendance in meetings is available to all G Suite Admins through the Meet Audit log in Reports from the Admin console. You can also utilize the Audit Logs for this use case. A full report of meeting participants can be exported into Sheets based on filtering options, e.g. a date range. Here is an article which speaks about this feature in more detail: https://support.google.com/a/answer/9186729?hl=en
  5. Skype:Select a skype meeting call you want to view, and then click the Start time in

PROJECT FINANCING

7.1 Overview of Chapter

  1. This chapter describes the financing of the project activities. Financing of the ACEs is designed as a government programme to which the World Bank and/or AFD contributes funding. The ACE Impact project uses government and institutional budgets, agreed rules and emphasizes the strengthening of governmental and institutional oversight for its implementation. The programme consists of funding to the universities’ academic, technical, and administrative staff, other operational costs, and investments into goods, training, services and limited civil works. The World Bank and AFD finances an agreed amount of this programme if the results are achieved and the agreed fiduciary and safeguards rules and standards are followed.  The financing contribution of the governments and institutions will be the value of the estimated salaries and operational costs for the implementation of the ACEs. The amount of credit disbursements will be contingent on the satisfactory achievement of agreed, pre-specified programme implementation progress and performance results, referred to as disbursement linked indicators (DLIs). Each DLI has a unit disbursement price per unit of result achieved. The reporting and verification of the achievement of the DLIs and disbursements will be done either semi-annually or annually to be determined based upon country and ACE preferences as well as the transaction costs involved in each disbursement. An advance of around 10 percent of the credit amount will be made to countries with no overdue advances in the World Bank portfolio. The disbursements will reimburse the countries for selected  expenditure of the ACE Impact project which  are referred to as Eligible Expenditure Programmes (EEPs). The remaining of this chapter details the above project financing summary in the following sections:
    1. Financing per country and financing source.
    2. The financing modality of the ACEs.
    3. Disbursement and financing available to each ACE.
    4. The eligible expenditure programme for each ACE.

 

7.2 Financing per country and financing source

  1. IDA allocations will follow the standard practice for regional projects with up to two-thirds of the IDA amount of the project from the regional pool of IDA and one third (1/3) from the national allocation. Table 5.1 presents the project costs by country with the regional and national IDA breakdown.

 

 

 

 

Table 7.1: ACE Impact Project Cost and Financing (in US$ million equivalent)

 

Project Component

Total Project Cost

Government

Funding*

IDA Credit

IDA Grant

AFD Credit

ACE Impact I Countries

 

Burkina Faso (3 ACEs + 1 CoE)

59.5

26.5

22

11

Dijouti (1 Em. ACE + 1 CoE)

28

13

15

Ghana (8 ACEs + 1 CoE)

114

54

60

Guinea (1 ACE + 1 Em. ACE)

19

9

6.3

3.7

Senegal (4 ACEs)

28

13

15

Total Financing Required

248.5

115.5

118.3

24.7

ACE Impact II Countries

 

Benin (2 ACEs + 1 CoE)

31.2

14

2

4

11.2

Cote d’Ivoire (4 ACEs)

TBC

TBC

18.7

Gambia (1 Em. ACE)

21.0

9

12

0

Niger (1 ACE)

29

14

5

10

0

Nigeria (17 ACEs)

210

95

75

40

Togo (3 ACEs)

34

16

12

6

0

AAU (RFU)

5

5

Total Financing Required

330.2

148

94

37

51.2

Note: *The countries’ contribution to the project cost is the estimated amount required for the salaries of the staff of the ACEs and other university personnel.

 

7.3 Financing Modality

  1. Financing to the ACEs (components 1 and 2) will be results-based, while financing to the AAU, the Nigerian, Burkinabe, Ivorian and Ghanaian facilitation units (Component 3) will be based upon statement of expenditures. The remaining of this section will present the motivation and elements of the financing modality for Components 1 and 2.
  2. The motivation for a results-based approach for the ACEs is:
  • All focus and implementation efforts go towards generating the agreed results, not just disbursements. In many projects that are financed based upon costs, there is a highly unfortunate tendency to focus on increasing disbursements, because this is easily measurable and comparable across projects, while the true results of the project are not focused upon. A results-based financing explicitly links disbursements to results, and therefore disbursements will not take place without the agreed results.
  • Results-based financing increases efficiency and value, because it is no longer possible to invest the funding without producing the results. 
  • For most participating countries, the funding modality would introduce a new funding tool that enhances accountability for results, increases administrative autonomy of the institution to generate the desired results, and aligns the goals of the institutions with that of the government.
  • The funding modality strengthens the country’s own fiduciary programme and procedures. Often efforts are lost in training, applying and monitoring adherences to project (WB) specific fiduciary procedures. These rules are different from those of the regular government and country funding. The new (WB) set of rules can therefore create confusion and, most importantly, the project does not necessarily foster improved fiduciary capacity and monitoring, even though such capacity is critical for institutional development. Using the results-based funding modality, the project will adopt acceptable country fiduciary rules, and work to strengthen capacity and oversight in a sustainable manner.
  • A results-based financing modality must provide adequate institutional autonomy to invest the financing as required to achieve the results. Institutions therefore gain autonomy and build administrative capacity to produce the results.

 

7.4 The Financing modality elements

 

  1. The Africa Centres of Excellence for Development Impact (ACE Impact) is a government programme to which the World Bank and French Development Agency (AFD) contribute funding. The ACE Impact programme uses government and institutional budgets, government-agreed rules and oversight for its implication. The programme consists of funding to the ACE’s teaching, researching, technical, and administrative staff, other operational costs for the ACE, and investments into goods, training, services and limited civil works. The World Bank and AFD finance an agreed amount of this programme if the results are achieved and the agreed fiduciary and safeguards rules are adequately followed.  In order to ensure that actual and reasonable expenditures are financed, the World Bank and AFD will primarily or exclusively finance the salary or other non-procurable operational costs of the programme. The government or the institution will commit themselves, and prove during implementation, that it invests the agreed amounts in the ACE Impact programme, notably in the limited civil works, learning equipment, faculty training, etc. as per the agreed ACE Impact implementation plan for each ACE.

 

  1. Using a financing modality exclusively based upon results, the World Bank and AFD would like to emphasise results and the number of projects that achieve their results, while reducing the number of procurement transactions that projects do. Therefore, it is moving towards purely results-based financing. However, the Bank has concerns about the possibility of corruption, leakages, and inefficient use of funds. Further, there has to be a gradual learning process of pricing and monitoring results correctly. Therefore, it plans to finance the ACE Impact project through investment project financing where the disbursements are linked to indicators. As explained below, the primary factor for disbursements is results, but the World Bank and AFD still ensure that they finance actual, necessary, and verifiable costs for the programme. The Bank and AFD will reimburse programme costs that are fiduciary low-transaction costs, such as staff salaries. The investment expenditures for goods, services and limited civil works, which occasionally entail many transactions and substantial fiduciary risks, are assumed by the government and the institution.However, the World Bank and AFD will still facilitate and monitor that (i) the agreed investment amounts are available on a timely basis to the government and the institution and (ii) acceptable government and institutional fiduciary and safeguards guidelines are followed. Further, the World Bank and AFD will support fiduciary capacity building (but it will not take part in the fiduciary transactions except in special cases where it has been agreed that the expenditure for the procurable item will be part of the Eligible Expenditure Programme).

 

 

 

7.5 Disbursements and Financing per ACE

  1. The amount of credit disbursements will be contingent on achievement of results as measured by Disbursement Linked Indicators (DLIs). The DLIs are presented in Table 5.2 which is the generic model table in USD for all financed ACEs. This model has been adjusted to each ACE as a function of the amount allocated to each ACE and the applicable exchange rate on the date of negotiation of the Financing Agreement. There are seven DLIs broken down into DLRs. Each DLI is allocated an amount which is the ceiling for disbursement under that DLI. Both the DLIs and the DLRs are varies by country and by types of ACE.

 

  1. Exchange rate. The currency of the IDA credits is SDRs. The above amounts in USD are the equivalent USD amount of the SDR amounts in the Financing Agreement using the exchange at the time of negotiation with each country. Expression of the credits in SDR reduces currency fluctuations and therefore provides more stable financing over the five year period.

 

  1. Exchange rate The currency of the AFD credits is Euros.  The above amounts in USD are the equivalent USD amount of the Euro amounts in the AFD Financing Agreement using the exchange at the time of negotiation with each country. Expression of the credits in Euros reduces currency fluctuations and therefore provides more stable financing over the five year period.

 

Table 7.1 Generic Model DLI Financing Table

 

Disbursement Linked Indicator

Formula and Unit cost

Disbursement Calculation

(expressed in USD equivalent)

DLI #1  Institutional implementation readiness

·   DLR# 1.1: Basic Readiness: USD 300,000 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone

 

·   DLR# 1.2: Full Readiness: USD 300,000 per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone

 

DLI #1: 600,000

 

(disbursed when all results have been completed)

DLI #2 Development Impact of the ACE Centre

·        DLR# 2.1 Progress to Impact: USD 25,000 per point in the score. Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

·        DLR# 2.2 Development Impact: USD 25,000 per point in the score. Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

DLI #2: 200,000

 

DLI#3

Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

DLRs  are scalable per student with at least 30% of regional students.

·        DLR#3.1: New PhD students in ACE courses. Amounts:

§ 10,000 per national student

§ 12,500 per female student

§ 12,500 per regional student

§ 15,600 per female regional student

 

·        DLR#3.2: New Master students in ACE courses. Amounts:

§ 2,000 per national student

§ 2,500 per female student

§ 4,000 per regional student

§ 5,000 per regional female student

 

·        DLR#3.3: New short term students in ACE courses. Amounts:

§ 400 per national student

§ 500 per female national student

§ 800 per regional student

§ 1000 per female regional student

 

·        DLR#3.4: New Bachelor Students in ACE courses. Amounts:

§ 1,000 per national male student

§ 1,500 per national female student

DLI #3: 825,000

 

 

DLI#4:

Quality of education and research through regionalization

·        DLR# 4.1: Accreditation Steps: Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step:

§ US$ 300,000 per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency

§ US$ 100,000 per program nationally/regionally accredited

§ US$ 100,000 per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken

§ US$ 50,000 for new/revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board.

 

 

·        DLR#4.2: Research Publications: Scalable per article. Amounts:

§ US$ 10,000 per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners

§ US$ 15,000 per article co-authored with regional partners

 

·        DLR#4.3: Improved learning and research infrastructure. Not scalable within each milestone.

§ US$ 300,000 per milestone

DLI #4: 1,700,000

 

 

 

DLI#5 Relevance of education and research

·        DLR#5.1: Externally generated revenue. Amounts:

§   S$ 1 for each US$ 1 generated from national non-firm sources or international sources

§  US$ 2 for each US$ 1 generated from regional or private sources

 

·        DLR#5.2: Number of students and faculty with at least 1-month period internship. Amounts:

§ 1,000 per period within the country

§ 1,500 per period within the region

 

·        DLR#5.3: Milestone for developing entrepreneurship Not scalable within each milestone.

§ US$ 100,000 for the milestone.

DLI #5: 795,000

 

DLI#6 Timeliness and quality of fiduciary reporting

Scalable within each result.

 

·        DLR#6.1: Timely fiduciary reporting and submissions. Amounts:

§ US$15 000 per year

·        DLR#6.2: Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management. Amounts:

§ US$15 000 per year

·        DLR#6.3: Web transparency of ACE expenses. Amounts:

§ US$15 000 per year

·        DLR#6.4: Quality of Procurement. Amounts:

§ US$15 000 per year

DLI #6: 255,000

 

 

DLI#7 Institutional impact (by ACE host institution)

Not scalable within each result.

·        DLR#7.1:Meaningful Uniersity Regional Strategy. Amounts:

§  US$100 000

·        DLR#7.2 Open and merit-based selection university heads. Amounts:

§  US$ 200,000 for selection of the head of institution

§  US$ 50,000  for selection of a dean

·        DLR#7.3 Institutional wide accreditation steps. Amounts:

§  US$ 200,000 for Insttutional international accreditation

§  US $ 75,000  each for gap assessment/self-evaluation

·        DLR#7.4 Participation in PASET Benchmarking. Amounts:

§  US$ 50,000 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

·        DLR#7.5 Milestones for Institutional Impact. Amounts:

§  US$ 100,000 per institutional impact milestone

·        DLR#7.6 Milestones for Participation in the NREM services. Amounts:

§  US$ 100,000 per year for single or bundle services ( Applicable for Nigeria Only)

DLI #7: 625,000

 

 And

 

DLI# 7: 725,000 ( For Nigeria only)

 

Note: Formulas and calculations in the table above are based on a total allocation of USD 5 million.

 

Table 7.2(a) Summary of Burkina Faso Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (EUR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

1,998,000

0

6

0

0

0

0

SDR 333,000 per milestone.

 

Not scalable within each milestone.

Allocated amount:

1,998,000

 

1,998,000

0

0

0

0

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center

698,560

0

0

8

8

16

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

EUR 21,830 per point in the score.

Allocated amount:

698,560

 

 0

174,640

174,640

349,280

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

3,636,285

0

11 PhD students

 

40 Master students

 

130 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

35 PhD students

 

110 Master students

 

200 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

46 PhD students

 

125 Master students

 

210 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

52 PhD students

 

135 Master students

 

250 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

41 PhD students

 

130 Master students

 

250 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose.

· PhD students:

– EUR 8,730 per male national student

– EUR 11,000 per female national student

– EUR 11,000 per male regional student

– EUR 13,600 per female regional student

 

· Master Students:

– EUR 1,750 per national student

– EUR 2,200 per female student

– EUR 3,750 per regional student

– EUR 4,400 per regional female student

 

· Short-course professional:

– EUR 350 per national student

– EUR 435 per female student

– EUR 700 per regional student

– EUR 870 per female regional student

 

· First degree Students:

– EUR 870 per national male student

– EUR 1,305 per national female student

Allocated amount:

3,636,285

0

265,950

711,275

852,100

958,600

848,360

 

DLI 4:

Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

9,168,200

0

4 accredi-tation steps

 

40

published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

7 accredi-tation steps

 

50

published research articles

 

3

milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

7 accredi-tation steps

 

65  published research articles

 

6 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

4 accredi-tation steps

 

70 published research articles

 

3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

0 accredi-tation steps

 

65 published research articles

 

4 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

· Accreditation step (not scalable per step):

– EUR 262,000 per program intl. accredited

– EUR 87,320 per program nat./reg. accredited

– EUR 87,320 per gap/self-evaluation

– EUR 43,660 for new/revamped courses

 

· Research publication (scalable per article):

– EUR 8,730 per article co-authored by ACE

– EUR 13,095 per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

· Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone):

– EUR 262,000 per milestone

Allocated amount:

9,16, 200

 

416,000

1,829,920

2,639,280

2,561,000

1,722,000

 

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

4,426,255

0

88,000

 in revenue

 

45 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

782,000

 in revenue

 

100 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

1,067,000

 in revenue

 

110 Internships

 

2 Entre-preneur milestones

968,930

 in revenue

 

160 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

857,885

 in revenue

 

125

internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

· External revenue:

– EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources

– EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies

 

· Internships:

– EUR 870 per period in country

– EUR 1,305 per period in region

 

· Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable):

–  EUR 87,320 for the milestone

Allocated amount:

4,426 255

 

127,150

869,000

1,337,340

, 126,130

966,635

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

1,270,700

0

4

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

5 transparency of ACE expenses

 

4 quality of procurement planning

5

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

5 transparency of ACE expenses

 

5 quality of procurement planning

5

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

5 transparency of ACE expenses

 

5 quality of procurement planning

5

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

5 transparency of ACE expenses

 

4 quality of procurement planning

5

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

5 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

5 transparency of ACE expenses

 

5 quality of procurement planning

· Scalable within each result.

 

– EUR 13,100 for timely fiduciary reporting

– EUR 13,100 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

– EUR 13,100 for transparency of ACE expenses

– EUR 13,100 for Quality of procurement planning

Allocated amount:

1,270,700

 

235,800

262,000

262,000

248,900

262,000

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

1,202,000

0

0  University regional strategy

 

0

Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0

PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

2  University regional strategy

 

0

Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

2

PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0  University regional strategy

 

0

Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

3

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0

 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0  University regional strategy

 

 3

 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

2

 PASET Benchmarking

 

1 Milestones on institutional impact

0  University regional strategy

 

0

Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

3 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0

PASET Benchmarking

 

2 Milestones on institutional impact

Not scalable.

· University-wide regional strategy:

– SDR 71,900.

 

· Open, merit-based competitive selection:

– SDR 143,800 for the head of institution

– SDR 35,950  for a dean

 

· Accreditation step:

– SDR 143,800 for international accreditation

– SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation

 

· PASET Benchmarking

– SDR 35,950  for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

 

· Institutional impact:

– SDR 143,800  per institutional impact milestone

Allocated amount:

1,20, 000

 

0

218,000

159,000

252,000

573,000

 

Total IDA Financing

19,200,000

 

1,044,900

3,846,835

5,265,360

5,243,910

3,798,995

 

 

Table 7.2(b) Summary of Djibouti Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (SDR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

1,294,240

0

4

0

0

0

0

SDR 323,560 per milestone.

 

Not scalable within each milestone.

Allocated amount:

1,294,240

 

1,294,240

0

0

0

0

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Center

201,320

0

0

0

4

4

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

SDR 25,165 per point in the score.

Allocated amount:

201,320

 

0

0

100,660

100,660

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

1,353,330

0

0 PhD students

 

10 Master students

 

0 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

0 PhD students

 

30 Master students

 

25 Short course professional students

 

80 first degree students

5 PhD students

 

60 Master students

 

100 Short course professional students

 

160 first degree students

15 PhD students

 

70 Master students

 

100 Short course professional students

 

160 first degree students

15 PhD students

 

90 Master students

 

110 Short course professional students

 

300 first degree students

Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose.

· PhD students:

– SDR 7,190 per male national student

– SDR 8,990 per female national student

– EUR SDR 8,990 per male regional student

– EUR SDR 11,215 per female regional student

 

· Master Students:

– SDR 1,440 per national male student

– SDR1,800 per national female student

– SDR 2,875 per regional male student

– SDR 3,595 per regional female student.

 

· Short-course professional:

– SDR 290 per national male student

– SDR 360 per national female student

– SDR 575 per regional male student

– SDR 720 per female regional student

 

· First degree students:

– SDR 720 per male student

– SDR 1,080 per female student

Allocated amount:

1,353,330

0

20,000

120,115

292,640

386,110

534,465

 

DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

3,846,715

0

1 accredi-tation steps

 

5

published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

5 accredi-tation steps

 

10

published research articles

 

0

milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

3 accredi-tation steps

 

15 published research articles

 

4 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

3 accredi-tation steps

 

20 published research articles

 

5 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

0 accredi-tation steps

 

20 published research articles

 

1 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

· Accreditation step (not scalable per step):

– EUR 215,705 per program intl. accredited

– EUR 71,900 per program nat./reg. accredited

– EUR 71,900 per gap/self-evaluation

– EUR 35,950 for new/revamped courses

 

· Research publication (scalable per article):

– EUR 7,190 per article co-authored by ACE

– EUR 10,785 per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

· Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone):

– EUR 215,705 per milestone

Allocated amount:

3,846,715

 

71,900

323,550

1,157,610

1,919,770

373,885

 

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

1,679,820

0

35,000 in revenue

 

40 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

185,000 in revenue

 

90 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

320,000 in revenue

 

110 Internships

 

1 Entre-preneur milestones

375,000 in revenue

 

120 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

325,720 in revenue

 

150 internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

· External revenue:

– EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources

– EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies

· Internships:

– EUR 720 per period in country

– EUR 1,080 per period in region

 

· Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable):

–  EUR 71,900 for the milestone

 

Allocated amount:

1,679,820

 

63,800

249,800

471,100

461,400

433,720

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

647,100

0

0 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

0 quality of procurement planning

2 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

2 quality of procurement planning

2 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

2 quality of procurement planning

2 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

2 quality of procurement planning

2 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

2 quality of procurement planning

· Scalable within each result.

 

– EUR 15,820 for timely fiduciary reporting

– EUR 15,820 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

– EUR 15,820 for transparency of ACE expenses

– EUR 15,820 for Quality of procurement planning

Allocated amount:

647,100

 

71,900

143,800

143,800

143,800

143,800

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

377,475

0

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

1 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

1 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

1

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

 1 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

1 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

1 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

Not scalable.

· University-wide regional strategy:

– SDR 71,900.

 

· Open, merit-based competitive selection:

– SDR 143,800 for the head of institution

– SDR 35,950  for a dean

 

· Accreditation step:

– SDR 143,800 for international accreditation

– SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation

 

· PASET Benchmarking

– SDR 35,950  for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

 

· Institutional impact:

– SDR 143,800  per institutional impact milestone

Allocated amount:

377,475

 

0

107,850

53,925

71,900

143,800

 

Total IDA Financing

9,400,000

 

1,521,840

945,115

2,219,735

3,083,640

1,629,670

 

 

Table 7.2(c) Summary of Ghana Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (SDR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

3,662,960

0

12

0

0

0

0

SDR 305,580 per milestone.

 

Not scalable within each milestone.

Allocated amount:

3,662,960

 

3,662,960

0

0

0

0

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center

1,380,480

0

0

12

20

32

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

SDR 21,570 per point in the score.

Allocated amount:

1,380,480

 

0

258,840

431,400

690,240

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

6,576,705

0

21 PhD students

 

50 Master students

 

280 Short course professional students

94 PhD students

 

225 Master students

 

480 Short course professional students

114 PhD students

 

180 Master students

 

530 Short course professional students

127 PhD students

 

225 Master students

 

530 Short course professional students

116 PhD students

 

195 Master students

 

530 Short course professional students

Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose.

· PhD students:

– SDR 7,190 per male national student

– SDR 8,990 per female national student

– SDR 8,990 per male regional student

– SDR 11,215 per female regional student

 

· Master Students:

– SDR 1,440 per national male student

– SDR1,800 per national female student

– SDR 2,875 per regional male student

– SDR 3,595 per regional female student

 

· Short-course professional & first-degree students:

– SDR 290 per national male student

– SDR 360 per national female student

– SDR 575 per regional male student

– SDR 720 per female regional student

Allocated amount:

6,576,705

0

389,700

1,325,140

1,589,125

1,708,600

1,564,140

 

DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

10,722,050

0

1 accredi-tation steps

 

34 published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

15 accredi-tation steps

 

89 published research articles

 

1 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

5 accredi-tation steps

 

110 published research articles

 

8 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

6 accredi-tation steps

 

135 published research articles

 

10 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

0 accredi-tation steps

 

95 published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

· Accreditation step (not scalable per step):

– SDR 215,705 per program intl. accredited

– SDR 71,900 per program nat./reg. accredited

– SDR 71,900 per gap/self-evaluation

– SDR 35,950 for new/revamped courses

 

· Research publication (scalable per article):

– SDR 7,190  per article co-authored by ACE

– SDR 10,785 per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

· Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone):

– EUR 215,705 per milestone

Allocated amount:

10,722,050

 

331,500

1,920,605

3,034,140

4,616,030

819,775

 

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

10,790,405

0

212,000 in revenue

 

100 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

1,570,000 in revenue

 

290 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

2,350,000 in revenue

 

335 Internships

 

8 Entre-preneur milestones

2,782,800 in revenue

 

435 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

2,184,405 in revenue

 

370 internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

· External revenue:

– EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources

– EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies

 

· Internships:

– EUR 720 per period in country

– EUR 1,080 per period in region

· Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable):

–  EUR 71,900 for the milestone

Allocated amount:

10,790,405

 

284,000

1,778,800

3,180,800

3,096,000

2,450,805

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

2,847,600

0

9 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

9 transparency of ACE expenses

 

9 quality of procurement planning

9 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

9 transparency of ACE expenses

 

9 quality of procurement planning

9 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

9 transparency of ACE expenses

 

9 quality of procurement planning

9 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

9 transparency of ACE expenses

 

9 quality of procurement planning

9 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

9 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

9 transparency of ACE expenses

 

9 quality of procurement planning

· Scalable within each result.

 

– EUR 15,820 for timely fiduciary reporting

– EUR 15,820 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

– EUR 15,820 for transparency of ACE expenses

– EUR 15,820 for Quality of procurement planning

Allocated amount:

2,847,600

 

569,520

569,520

569,520

569,520

569,520

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

3,019,800

0

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

5 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

5 Institutional accreditation steps

 

5 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

4 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

 5 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

5 Institutional accreditation steps

 

5 PASET Benchmarking

 

3

 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

4 Milestones on institutional impact

Not scalable.

· University-wide regional strategy:

– SDR 71,900.

 

· Open, merit-based competitive selection:

– SDR 143,800 for the head of institution

– SDR 35,950  for a dean

 

· Accreditation step:

– SDR 143,800 for international accreditation

– SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation

 

· PASET Benchmarking

– SDR 35,950  for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

 

· Institutional impact:

SDR 143,800  per institutional impact milestone

Allocated amount:

3,019,800

 

0

539,250

575,200

1,294,200

611,150

 

Total IDA Financing

39,000,000

 

5,237,680

6,392,155

9,380,185

11,974,590

6,015,390

 

 

 

 

 

Table 7.2(d) Summary of Guinea Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (SDR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

862,820

0

4

0

0

0

0

SDR 215,705 per milestone.

 

Not scalable within each milestone.

Allocated amount:

862,820

 

862,820

0

0

0

0

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center

287,600

0

0

4

4

8

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

SDR 17,975 per point in the score.

Allocated amount:

287,600

 

0

71,900

71,900

143,800

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

1,217,030

0

2 PhD students

 

20 Master students

 

10 Short course professional students

 

40 first degree students

5 PhD students

 

50 Master students

 

65 Short course professional students

 

40 first degree students

15 PhD students

 

70 Master students

 

65 Short course professional students

 

40 first degree students

15 PhD students

 

70 Master students

 

110 Short course professional students

 

50 first degree students

15 PhD students

 

70 Master students

 

110 Short course professional students

 

50 first degree students

Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose.

· PhD students:

– SDR 7,190 per male national student

– SDR 8,990 per female national student

– SDR 8,990 per male regional student

– SDR 11,215 per female regional student

 

· Master Students:

– SDR 1,440 per national male student

– SDR1,800 per national female student

– SDR 2,875 per regional male student

– SDR 3,595 per regional female student

 

· Short-course professional & first-degree students:

– SDR 290 per national male student

– SDR 360 per national female student

– SDR 575 per regional male student

SDR 720 per female regional student

Allocated amount:

1,217,030

0

73,340

213,190

299,450

310,500

320,550

 

DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

2,279,335

0

0 accredi-tation steps

 

8

published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

6 accredi-tation steps

 

8

published research articles

 

0

milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

0 accredi-tation steps

 

14 published research articles

 

4 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

1 accredi-tation steps

 

14 published research articles

 

2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

0 accredi-tation steps

 

15 published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

· Accreditation step (not scalable per step):

– SDR 215,705 per program intl. accredited

– SDR 71,900 per program nat./reg. accredited

– SDR 71,900 per gap/self-evaluation

– SDR 35,950 for new/revamped courses

 

· Research publication (scalable per article):

– SDR 7,190  per article co-authored by ACE

– SDR 10,785 per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

· Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone):

– EUR 215,705 per milestone

Allocated amount:

2,279,335

 

64,710

352,315

977,890

762,190

122,230

 

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

1,004,795

0

38,000 in revenue

 

20 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

175,840 in revenue

 

70 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

188,000 in revenue

 

75 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

188,000 in revenue

 

75 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

184,555 in revenue

 

80 internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

· External revenue:

– EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources

– EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies

 

· Internships:

– EUR 720 per period in country

– EUR 1,080 per period in region

· Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable):

 EUR 71,900 for the milestone

Allocated amount:

1,004,795

 

52,400

226,240

242,000

242,000

242,155

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

345,120

0

0 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

0 quality of procurement planning

2 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

2 quality of procurement planning

2 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

2 quality of procurement planning

2 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

2 quality of procurement planning

2 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

0 quality of procurement planning

· Scalable within each result.

 

– SDR 10,785 for timely fiduciary reporting

– SDR 10,785 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

– SDR 10,785 for transparency of ACE expenses

– SDR 10,785 for Quality of procurement planning

Allocated amount:

345,120

 

43,140

86,280

64,710

86,280

64,710

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

503,300

0

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

1 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

2 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

2

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

 1 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

2 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

1 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

 

0

Milestones on institutional impact

Not scalable.

· University-wide regional strategy:

– SDR 71,900.

 

· Open, merit-based competitive selection:

– SDR 143,800 for the head of institution

– SDR 35,950  for a dean

 

· Accreditation step:

– SDR 143,800 for international accreditation

– SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation

 

· PASET Benchmarking

– SDR 35,950  for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

 

· Institutional impact:

SDR 143,800  per institutional impact milestone

Allocated amount:

503,300

 

0

143,800

107,850

107,850

143,800

 

Total IDA Financing

6,500,000

 

1,096,410

1,093,725

1,763,800

1,652,620

893,445

 

 

 

Table 7.2(e) Summary of Senegal Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (EUR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

1 188 000

0

4

0

0

0

0

EUR 297,000 per milestone.

 

Not scalable within each milestone.

Allocated amount:

1,188,000

 

1,188,000

0

0

0

0

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Center

698,560

0

0

8

8

16

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

EUR 21,830 per point in the score.

Allocated amount:

698,560

 

 0

174,640

174,640

349,280

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

1,872,340

0

10 PhD students

 

40 Master students

 

80 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

20 PhD students

 

50 Master students

 

80 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

24 PhD students

 

50 Master students

 

80 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

24 PhD students

 

50 Master students

 

120 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

32 PhD students

 

60 Master students

 

200 Short course professional students

 

0 first degree students

Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose.

 

· PhD students:

– EUR 8,730 per male national student

– EUR 11,000 per female national student

– EUR 11,000 per male regional student

– EUR 13,600 per female regional student

 

· Master Students:

– EUR 1,750 per national student

– EUR 2,200 per female student

– EUR 3,750 per regional student

– EUR 4,400 per regional female student

 

· Short-course professional:

– EUR 350 per national student

– EUR 435 per female student

– EUR 700 per regional student

– EUR 870 per female regional student

 

· First degree Students:

– EUR 870 per national male student

– EUR 1,305 per national female student

Allocated amount:

1,872,340

0

227,100

347,530

385,950

405,160

506,600

 

DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

3,995,920

0

0 accredi-tation steps

 

24

published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

2 accredi-tation steps

 

24

published research articles

 

0

milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

2 accredi-tation steps

 

24 published research articles

 

2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

6 accredi-tation steps

 

24 published research articles

 

2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

0 accredi-tation steps

 

24 published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

· Accreditation step (not scalable per step):

– EUR 262,000 per program intl. accredited

– EUR 87,320 per program nat./reg. accredited

– EUR 87,320 per gap/self-evaluation

– EUR 43,660 for new/revamped courses

 

· Research publication (scalable per article):

– EUR 8,730 per article co-authored by ACE

– EUR 13,095 per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

· Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone):

– EUR 262,000 per milestone

 

3,995,920

 

260,000

347,320

871,320

1,657,280

260,000

 

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

1,756,400

0

66,000

 in revenue

 

30 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

205,460

 in revenue

 

60 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

292,000

 in revenue

 

60 Internships

 

2 Entre-preneur milestones

386,000

 in revenue

 

60 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

380,000

 in revenue

 

80

internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

· External revenue:

– EUR 1 for each EUR 1 generated from non-company sources

– EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies

 

· Internships:

– EUR 870 per period in country

– EUR 1,305 per period in region

 

· Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable):

 EUR 87,320 for the milestone

 

1,756,400

 

92,100

257,660

518,840

438,200

449,600

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

1,048,000

0

4

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

4 transparency of ACE expenses

 

4 quality of procurement planning

4

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

4 transparency of ACE expenses

 

4 quality of procurement planning

4

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

4 transparency of ACE expenses

 

4 quality of procurement planning

4

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

4 transparency of ACE expenses

 

4 quality of procurement planning

4

Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

4 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

4 transparency of ACE expenses

 

4 quality of procurement planning

· Scalable within each result.

 

– EUR 13,100 for timely fiduciary reporting

– EUR 13,100 for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

– EUR 13,100 for transparency of ACE expenses

EUR 13,100 for Quality of procurement planning

 

1,048,000

 

209,600

209,600

209,600

209,600

209,600

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

1,440,780

0

0  University regional strategy

 

0

Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0

PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

2  University regional strategy

 

0

Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

2

PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0  University regional strategy

 

0

Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

2

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0

 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0  University regional strategy

 

 0

 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

2

 PASET Benchmarking

 

3 Milestones on institutional impact

0  University regional strategy

 

0

Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

4 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0

PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

Not scalable.

· University-wide regional strategy:

– SDR 71,900.

 

· Open, merit-based competitive selection:

– SDR 143,800 for the head of institution

– SDR 35,950  for a dean

 

· Accreditation step:

– SDR 143,800 for international accreditation

– SDR 53,925 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation

 

· PASET Benchmarking

– SDR 35,950  for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

 

· Institutional impact:

SDR 143,800  per institutional impact milestone

 

1,440,780

 

0

261,960

130,980

349,280

698,560

 

Total IDA Financing

11,400,000

 

1,976,800

1,598,710

2,291.330

3,408,800

2,124,360

 

Table 7.2(f) Summary of Benin Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (SDR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

 

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

176,000

 

4

0

0

0

0

SDR 220 000 per milestone.

 

Not scalable within each milestone.

Allocated amount:

176,000

 

176,000

0

0

0

0

 

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center

58,640

 

0

4

4

8

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

SDR 18,325 per point in the score.

Allocated amount:

58,640

 

0

14,660

14,660

29,320

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

385,470

0

3 PhD students

 

5 Master students

 

14 Short course professional students

 

5 PhD students

 

11 Master students

 

16 Short course professional students

 

6 PhD students

 

12 Master students

 

22 Short course professional students

 

6 PhD students

 

12 Master students

 

22 Short course professional students

 

6 PhD students

 

12 Master students

 

22 Short course professional students

 

Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose.

 

· PhD students:

– SDR 7330 per male national student,

– SDR 9160 per female national student,

– SDR 9160  per male regional student,

– (SDR 11450 per female regional student.

 

· Master students:

– SDR 1470 per national student,

– SDR 1830 per female student,

– SDR 1830 per regional student

– SDR 3660 per regional female student.

 

· Short-course professional students:

– SDR 295 per national male student,

– SDR 370 per female national student,

– SDR 590 per regional male student,

– SDR 730 per female regional student.

 

· First degree students:

– SDR 730 per national male student,

– SDR 1100 per national female student

Allocated amount:

385,470

0

43,000

76,070

88,000

88,000

88,000

 

DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

682,130

0

0 accredi-tation steps

 

3   published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

4 accredi-tation steps

 

5   published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

3 accredi-tation steps

 

5   published research articles

 

3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

2 accredi-tation steps

 

5   published research articles

 

4 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

1 accredi-tation steps

 

4   published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

· Accreditation step (not scalable per step):

– SDR 220,000 per program intl. accredited

– SDR 73,300 per program nat./reg. accredited

– SDR 73,300 per gap/self-evaluation

– SDR 36,650 for new/revamped courses

 

· Research publication (scalable per article):

– SDR 7,330 per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners;

– SDR 11,000 per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

· Teaching and research infrastructure (not scalable within each milestone):

– SDR 220 000 per milestone

 

682,130

 

28,600

67,330

221,000

283,200

82,000

 

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

654,400

0

30,000 in revenue

 

9  Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

112,000 in revenue

 

19 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

132,000 in revenue

 

20 Internships

 

2 Entre-preneur milestones

152,000 in revenue

 

20 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

110,940 in revenue

 

20 internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

· External revenue:

– EUR 1 for each EUR generated from national non-company sources

– EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies;

 

· Internship:

– EUR 915 per period in country

– EUR 1375 per period in region

 

· Entrepreneurship milestone (not scalable):

– EUR 91 500 for the milestone.

 

654,400

 

38,235

129,385

186,900

170,300

129,580

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

145,600

0

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

0 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3  quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

1 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

Scalable within each result.

 

– USD 15,000 (EUR 14000) for timely fiduciary reporting

 

– USD 15,000 (EUR 14000) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

 

– USD 15,000 (EUR 14000) for transparency of ACE expenses

 

· USD 15,000 (EUR 14000) for Quality of procurement planning

 

145,600

 

16,800

33,600

33,600

28,000

33,600

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

197,760

0

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

2 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

2 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

2 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

2 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

2 PASET Benchmarking

 

1

Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

2 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

2 Milestones on institutional impact

Not scalable.

· University-wide regional strategy:

– SDR 73 300

· Open, merit-based competitive selection:

– SDR 146 600 for the head of institution

– SDR 36650 for a dean;

 

· International Accreditation

– SDR 146 600 for international accreditation

– SDR 55 000 each for gap assessment/self-evaluation

 

· PASET Benchmarking

– SDR 36650 for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

 

· Institutional Impact

– SDR 73 300 per institutional impact milestone

 

 

197,760

 

0

44,000

22,000

43,980

87,780

 

Total IDA Financing (SDR)

1 500 000

 

247,600

202,060

346,460

445,300

258,580

 

Total IDA Financing (EUR)

800,000

 

55,035

162,985

220,500

198,300

163,180

 

 

 

Table 7.2(g) Summary of The Gambia Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (SDR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

 

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

990,000

0

2

0

0

0

0

Not scalable within each milestone

 

USD 675,000 (SDR 495,000) per milestone.

 

Allocated amount:

990,000

 

990,000

0

0

0

0

 

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center

264,000

0

0

0

4

4

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

USD 45,000 (SDR 33,000) per point in the score.

Allocated amount:

264,000

 

0

0

132,000

132,000

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

1,247,000

0

0 PhD students

 

0 Master students

 

0 Short course professional students

 

120 Bachelor students

0 PhD students

 

0 Master students

 

0 Short course professional students

 

180 Bachelor students

0 PhD students

 

0 Master students

 

20 Short course professional students

 

300 Bachelor students

0 PhD students

 

0 Master students

 

40 Short course professional students

 

360 Bachelor students

0 PhD students

 

0 Master students

 

120 Short course professional students

 

420 Bachelor students

Scalable per student.

 

The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose. Unless otherwise agreed with the government in the Regional Operational Manual, the Center can achieve the DLI through any combination of the student types (with exception that 30 percent of students must be regional).

 

·  PhD students:

–   USD 10,000 (SDR 7330) per male national student,

–   USD 12,500 (SDR 9125)per female  national student,

–   USD 12,500 (SDR 9125) per male regional student,

–   USD 15,600 (SDR 14450) per female regional student.

 

·  Master Students:

–   USD 2,000 (SDR 1470) per national student,

–   USD 2,500 (SDR 1835) per female student,

–    USD 4,000 (SDR 2940) per regional student

–   5,000 (SDR 3670) per regional female student.

 

·  Short-course professional students:

–   USD 400 (SDR 300) per national male student,

–   USD 500 (370) per female national student, 800 (SDR 590) per regional male student, a

–   1000 (SDR 730) per female regional student.

 

·  Bachelor Students:

–   1,000 (SDR 730) per national male student,

–   1,500 (SDR 1100) per national female student

Allocated amount:

1,247,000

0

103,000

154,000

264,000

323,000

403,000

 

DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

2,615,200

0

2 accredi-tation steps

 

0   published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

3 accredi-tation steps

 

0   published research articles

 

1 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

1 accredi-tation steps

 

0   published research articles

 

3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

1 accredi-tation steps

 

5   published research articles

 

3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

1 accredi-tation steps

 

5   published research articles

 

2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

·  Accreditation Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step:

–   US$ 300,000 (SDR 220,000) per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency;

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per program nationally/regionally accredited;

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken;

–   US$ 50,000 (SDR 36,650) for new/revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board.

 

·  Research publication: Scalable per article. Amounts:

–   US$ 10,000 (SDR 7330) per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners;

–   US$ 15,000 (SDR 11,000) per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

·  Teaching and research infrastructure, the result is not scalable within each milestone.

–   US$ 300,000 (SDR 220,000) per milestone

 

2,615,200

 

73,300

366,600

733,300

742,000

700,000

 

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

824,950

0

57,000 in revenue

 

0 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

75,000 in revenue

 

20 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

104,000 in revenue

 

30 Internships

 

1 Entre-preneur milestones

130,000 in revenue

 

60 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

173,650 in revenue

 

80 internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

·  External revenue,

–   US$ 1 for each US$ 1 generated from national non-firm sources or international sources;

–   US$ 2 for each US$ 1 generated from regional or private sources;

 

·  Internship,

–   US$ 1,000 (SDR 730) per period in country

–   US$ 1,500 (SDR 1100) per period in region

 

·  Entrepreneurship Not scalable

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300) for the milestone.

 

824,950

 

57,000

89,600

199,200

173,800

305,350

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

374,000

0

0 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

1 transparency of ACE expenses

 

0 quality of procurement planning

1 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

1 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

1 transparency of ACE expenses

 

1 quality of procurement planning

1 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

1 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

1 transparency of ACE expenses

 

1 quality of procurement planning

1 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

1 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

1 transparency of ACE expenses

 

1 quality of procurement planning

1 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

1 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

1 transparency of ACE expenses

 

1 quality of procurement planning

Scalable within each result.

 

For instance, disbursement can take place for the reports that were timely submitted even if other reports were submitted with a delay.

 

–   US$ 30 000 (SDR 22,000) for timely fiduciary reporting

 

–   US$ 30 000 (SDR 22,000) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

–    

–   USD 30 000 (SDR 22,000) for Web transparency of ACE expenditures

 

–   USD 30 000 (SDR 22,000) for Quality of procurement planning

 

374,000

 

22,000

88,000

88,000

88,000

88,000

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

384,850

0

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

1 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

1 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

1 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

 1 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

1 PASET Benchmarking

 

0

 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

1 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

Not scalable.

·  University-wide regional strategy:

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300)

 

·  Open, merit-based competitive selection of the head of institution:

–   US$ 200,000 (SDR 146,600)

–   US$ 50,000 (SDR 36,650) for an open and merit-based competitive selection of a dean;

 

·  Accrediatation step

–   US$ 200,000 (SDR 146,600)  for

–   Institutional international accreditation;

–   US $ 75,000 (SDR 55,000) each for gap assessment/self-evaluation.

 

·  PASET Benchmarking

 

–   US$ 50,000 (SDR 36,650) for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

 

·  Institutional Impact

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per institutional impact milestone

 

384,850

 

0

109,950

55,000

73,300

146,600

 

Total IDA Financing

6,700,000

 

1,245,300

808,150

1,471,500

1,532,100

1,642,950

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 7.2(h) Summary of Nigeria Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (SDR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

 

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

2,444,444

0

20

0

0

0

0

USD 300,000 (SDR 220000) per milestone. Not scalable within each milestone (

 

NOT APPLICABLE FOR RENEWAL CENTERS)

Allocated amount:

2,444,444

 

2,444,444

0

0

0

0

 

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center

1,449,711

0

0

28

40

68

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

–   USD 25,000 (SDR 18325) per point in the score

Allocated amount:

1,449,711

 

0

317,633

407,222

724,856

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

6,537,778

0

68 PhD students

 

99 Master students

 

207 Short course professional students

 

85 PhD students

 

176 Master students

 

263 Short course professional students

 

108 PhD students

 

176 Master students

 

328 Short course professional students

 

108 PhD students

 

198 Master students

 

494 Short course professional students

 

108 PhD students

 

226 Master students

 

494 Short course professional students

 

Scalable per student.

·  PhD students:

–   USD 10,000 (SDR 7330) per male national student,

–   USD 12,500 (SDR 9160) per female national student,

–   USD 12,500(SDR 9160)  per male regional student,

–   USD 15,600 (SDR 11450) per female regional student.

·  Master Students:

–   USD 2,000 (1470) per national student,

–   USD 2,500 (SDR 1830) per female student, USD 4,000 (SDR 2930) per regional student

–   5,000 ((SDR 3670) per regional female student.

 

·  short-course professional students:

–   USD 400 (SDR 295) per national male student

–   ,USD 500 (SDR 370) per female national student,

–   USD 800 (SDR 590) per regional male student,

–   USD 1000 (SDR 730) per female regional student.

·  Bachelor Students:

–   USD 1,000 (SDR 730) per national male student,

–   USD 1,500 (SDR 1100) per national female student

Allocated amount:

6,537,778

0

860,556

1,188,667

1,418,889

1,505,667

1,564,000

 

DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

11,085,278

0

0  accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

71   published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

27 accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

71  published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

10 accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

99   published research articles

 

27 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

10 accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

99 published research articles

 

10 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

10 accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

99 published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

For accreditation Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step:

–   US$ 300,000 (SDR 220 000) per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency;

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per program nationally/regionally accredited;

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken;

–   US$ 50,000 (SDR 36650) for new/revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board.

 

·  Research publication: Scalable per article. Amounts:

–   US$ 10,000 (SDR 7330) per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty and national partners;

–   US$ 15,000 (SDR 11 000) per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

·  Teaching and research infrastructure, the result is not scalable within each milestone.

–   US$ 300,000 (SDR 220 000) per milestone

 

11,085,278

 

625,778

1,192,167

4,675,222

2,499,667

2,092,444

 

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

9,918,311

0

705,333 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

99 Internships

 

 

 

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

1,430,556 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

241 Internships

 

 

 

 

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

1,778,667 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

297 Internships

 

 

 

 

 

17 Entre-preneur milestones

2,244,222 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

408 Internships

 

 

 

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

1,934,000 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

463 Internships

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

·  External revenue,

–   US$ 1 for each US$ 1 (SDR 1 for each SDR 1) generated from national non-firm sources or international sources;

–   US$ 2 for each US$ 1 (SDR 2 for each SDR 1) generated from regional or private sources;

 

·  Internship,

–   US$ 1,000 (SDR 730) per period in country

–   US$ 1,500 (SDR 1100) per period in region

 

·  Entrepreneurship milestone

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) for the milestone. Not scalable

 

9,918,311

 

777,522

1,606,567

2,720,089

2,541,900

2,272,233

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

1,896,889

0

7 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

17 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

17 transparency of ACE expenses

 

0   quality of procurement planning

17 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

17 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

17 transparency of ACE expenses

 

17 quality of procurement planning

17 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

17 transparency of ACE expenses

 

17 quality of procurement planning

17 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

17 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

17 transparency of ACE expenses

 

17 quality of procurement planning

17 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

17 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

17 transparency of ACE expenses

 

17 quality of procurement planning

Scalable within each result

 

 

–   US$ 15 000 (SDR 11000) for timely fiduciary reporting

 

–   US$ 15 000 (SDR 11000) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

 

–   USD 15 000 (SDR 11000) for Web transparency of ACE expenditures

–    

–   USD 15 000 (SDR 11000) for Quality of procurement planning

 

1,896,889

 

265,222

435,111

326,333

435,111

435,111

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

7,067,589

0

0  University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

 

17          ICT services for innovation in teaching and research

10  University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

17 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

 

17          ICT services for innovation in teaching and research

0  University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

17

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

 

17          ICT services for innovation in teaching and research

7  University regional strategy

 

 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

17 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

 

17          ICT services for innovation in teaching and research

0  University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

17 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

 

17          ICT services for innovation in teaching and research

Not scalable.

 

–   University-wide regional strategy: US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300)

 

·  Open, merit-based competitive selection of the head of institution:

–   US$ 200,000 (SDR 146 600)

–   US$ 50,000  (SDR 36650) for an open and merit-based competitive selection of a dean;

 

 

·  International accreditation;

–   US$ 200,000 (SDR 146 600) for Institutional international accreditation;

 

 

·  PASET Benchmarking

–   US $ 75,000  (SDR 55 000) each for gap assessment/self-evaluation.

 

–   US$ 50,000 (SDR 36650) for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

·   Institutional Impact

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per institutional impact milestone

 

·  ICT services for innovation in teaching and research

–   US$ 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per year for a single or bundle of services

 

7,067,589

 

724,856

1,494,506

1,268,744

1,404,917

2,174,567

 

Total IDA Financing

40,400,000

 

5,698,378

6,234,650

10,816,500

9,112,117

8,538,356

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 7.2(i) Summary of Niger Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (SDR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

 

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

1,320,000

0

6

0

0

0

0

 

USD 300,000 (SDR 220,000) per milestone

 

Not scalable within each milestone..

Allocated amount:

1,320,000

 

1,320,000

0

0

0

0

 

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center

439,200

0

0

8

4

12

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

 USD 25,000 (SDR 18300) per point in the score.

Allocated amount:

439,200

 

0

146,400

73,200

219,600

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

1,889,200

0

 

 

2 PhD students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20 Master students

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 Short course professional students

 

 

 

5 PhD students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

60 Master students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

90 Short course professional students

 

 

 

20 PhD students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100 Master students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100 Short course professional students

 

 

 

20 PhD students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100 Master students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

160 Short course professional students

 

 

 

20 PhD students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

105 Master students

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

160 Short course professional students

 

Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose.

·  PhD students:

–   USD 10,000 (SDR 7330) per male national student,

–   USD 12,500 (SDR 9160) per female national student,

–   USD 12,500 (SDR 9160) per male regional student,

–   USD 15,600 (SDR 11450) per female regional student.

 

·  Master Students:

–   USD 2000 (SDR 1470) per national male student,

–   USD 2500 (SDR 1830)  per national female student,

–   USD 4000 (SDR 2930) per regional male student

–   USD 5000 (SDR 3660) per regional female student.

 

·  Short-course professional and first-degree students:

–   USD 400 (SDR 295) per national male student,

–   USD 500 (SDR 370) per national female student,

–   USD 800 (SDR 590) per regional male student,

–   USD 1000 (SDR 730) per female regional student.

 

·  Bachelor Students:

–   UDS 1000 (SDR 730) per national male students,

–   USD 1500 (SDR 1100) per national female student.

Allocated amount:

1,889,200

0

110,000

337,000

466,000

483,000

493,200

 

DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

3,751,600

0

0 accredi-tation steps

 

11  published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

7 accredi-tation steps

 

11  published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

2 accredi-tation steps

 

18 published research articles

 

6 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

1 accredi-tation steps

 

18   published research articles

 

3 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

2 accredi-tation steps

 

20   published research articles

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

·  For accreditation Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step:

 

–   USD 300,000 (SDR 220,000)per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency;

–   USD 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per program nationally/regionally accredited;

–   USD 100,000 (SDR 73,300) per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken;

–   USD 50,000 (SDR 36,650) revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board.

 

·  Research publication: Scalable per article. Amounts:

–   USD 10,000 (SDR 7330) per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty;

–   USD 15,000 (SDR 11000) per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

·  Teaching and research infrastructure, the result is not scalable within each milestone.

 

–   USD 300,000 (SDR 220,000) per milestone

 

3,751,600

 

92,000

387,600

1,622,000

1,037,000

613,000

 

Total IDA Financing

7 400 000

 

1522 000

871 000

2 161 200

1 739 600

1 106 200

 

 

DLI Total Financing (EUR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

1,920,325

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

74,000 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30 Internships

 

 

 

 

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

295,000 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

120 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

337,000 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

130 Internships

 

1 Entre-preneur milestones

337,000 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

130 Internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

287,150 in revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

135 internships

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

·  External Revenue,

–   EUR 1 for each EUR generated from national non-company sources or international sources;

–   EUR 2 for each EUR 1 generated from regional sources or companies;

 

·  Internship,

–   USD 1000 (EUR 915) per period in country

–   USD 1500 (EUR 1375) per period in region

 

 

·  Entrepreneurship milestone

 

–   USD 100,000 (EUR 91500) for the milestone. Not scalable.

 

1,920,325

 

101,450

404,800

547,450

455,950

410,675

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

658,800

0

0 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

0 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

0 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

0 quality of procurement planning

Scalable within each result.

–   USD 15,000 (EUR 13725) for timely fiduciary reporting

 

–   USD 15,000 (EUR 13725) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

 

–   USD 15,000 (EUR 13725) for transparency of ACE expenses

 

–   USD 15,000 (EUR 13725) for Quality of procurement planning

 

658,800

 

82,350

164,700

123,525

164,700

123,525

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

1,120,875

0

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

1 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

3 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

3 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

2 University regional strategy

 

 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

3 PASET Benchmarking

 

0

 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

1 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

2 Milestones on institutional impact

Not scalable.

·  University-wide regional strategy:

–   USD 100,000 (EUR 91500)

 

·  Open, merit-based competitive selection of the head of institution:

–   USD 200,000 (EUR 183000)

–   USD 50,000 (EUR 45750) for an open and merit-based competitive selection of a dean;

 

·  Accreditation Step

–   USD 200,000 (EUR 183000) for international accreditation;

–   USD 75,000 (EUR 68625) each for gap assessment/self-evaluation.

 

·  PASET Benchmarking

–   USD 50,000 (EUR 45750) for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

 

·  Institutional Impact

 

–   USD 100,000 (EUR 91500) per institutional impact milestone

 

1,120,875

 

0

228,750

205,875

320,250

366,000

 

Total IDA Financing

3,700,000

 

183,800

798,250

876,850

940,900

900,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 7.2(j) Summary of Togo Financing

 

DLI Total Financing (EUR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

 

DLI 1: Institutional readiness results

1 100 000

0

4

0

0

0

0

 

USD 300,000 (EUR 275 000) per milestone.

 

 Not scalable within each milestone.

Allocated amount:

1 100 000

 

1 100 000

0

0

0

0

 

 

DLI 2: Development Impact of ACE Impact Center

552 000

0

0

4

8

12

0

Scalable based on the score of the center on the scale (1 to 5).

 

–   USD 25,000 (EUR 23 000) per point in the score.

Allocated amount:

552 000

 

0

92 000

184 000

276 000

0

 

DLI 3: Quantity of students with focus on gender and regionalization

2,603,000

0

24 PhD students

 

 

 

 

 

45 Master students

 

90 Short course professional students

28 PhD students

 

 

 

 

55 Master students

 

110 Short course professional students

28 PhD students

 

 

 

 

 

65 Master students

 

170 Short course professional students

28 PhD students

 

 

 

 

 

 

65 Master students

 

170 Short course professional students

28 PhD students

 

 

 

 

 

 

65 Master students

 

170 Short course professional students

Scalable per student. The number of students by type is indicative in this table for planning purpose.

·  PhD students:

–   USD 10,000 (EUR 9150) per male national student,

–   USD 12,500 (EUR 11 500) per female national student,

–   USD 12,500 (EUR 11 500) per male regional student,

–   USD 15,600 (EUR 14 300) per female regional student.

 

·  Master Students:

–   USD 2000 (EUR 1830) per national male student,

–   USD 2500 (EUR 2300) per national female student,

–   USD 4000 (EUR 3660) per regional male student

–   USD 5000 (EUR 4580) per regional female student.

 

·  Short-course professional and first-degree students:

–   USD 400 (EUR 360) per national male student,

–   USD 500 (EUR 460) per national female student,

–   USD 800 (EUR 730) per regional male student,

–   USD 1000 (EUR 915)  per female regional student.

 

·  Bachelor Students: 

–   UDS 1000 (EUR 915) per national male students,

–   USD 1500 (EUR 1370) per national female student.

Allocated amount:

2,603,,000

0

422 000

504 000

559 000

559 000

559 000

 

DLI 4: Quality of Education and research through
international accreditation, research publications and improved teaching and research infrastructure

 

4,945,000

0

0 accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

30   published research articles

 

 

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

5 accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

30   published research articles

 

 

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

2 accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

30   published research articles

 

 

 

5 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

2 accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

 

30   published research articles

 

 

 

2 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

2 accredi-tation steps

 

 

 

 

40   published research articles

 

 

 

0 milestones for teaching and research infrastructure

·  Accreditation Not scalable per accreditation step. Amount per step:

–   USD 300,000 (EUR 275 000) per program internationally accredited by a pre-approved accreditation agency;

–   USD 100,000 (EUR 91 500) per program nationally/regionally accredited;

–   USD 100,000 (EUR 91 500) per gap-assessment/self-evaluation undertaken;

–   USD 50,000 (EUR 45 750)  revamped courses meeting international standards and approved by the Sector Advisory Board.

–          

·  Research publication: Scalable per article. Amounts:

–   USD 10,000 (EUR 9150) per article co-authored by ACE Impact student/faculty;

–   USD 15,000 (EUR 13 700) per article co-authored with regional partners.

 

·  Teaching and research infrastructure, the result is not scalable within each milestone.

–   USD 300,000 (EUR 275 000) per milestone

Allocated amount:

4,945,000

 

352 000

580 500

1 919 500

1 090 000

1 003 000

 

Total IDA Financing

9,200,000

 

1 874 000

1 176 500

2 662 500

1 925 000

1 562 000

 

 

 

DLI Total Financing (SDR)

DLI

DLRs and Indicative timeline for DLR achievement

Formula

Baseline

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

DLI 5: Relevance of Education and Research through externally generated revenue, internships, and entrepreneurship

2, 263,700

0

113 500 in revenue

 

 

 

70 Internships

 

 

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

 

367,000 in revenue

 

 

 

85 Internships

 

 

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

 

480,000 in revenue

 

 

 

85 Internships

 

 

 

3 Entre-preneur milestones

 

480,000 in revenue

 

 

 

85 Internships

 

 

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

 

304,000 in revenue

 

 

 

85 internships

 

 

 

0 Entre-preneur milestones

·  External revenue,

–   USD 1 for each USD 1 (SDR 1 for each SDR 1) generated from national non-company sources or international sources;

–   USD 2 for each USD 1 (SDR 2 for each SDR 1) generated from regional sources or companies;

 

·  Internship,

–   USD 1000 (SDR 730) per period in country

–   USD 1500 (SDR 1100) per period in region

 

·  Entrepreneurship milestone

–   USD 100,000 (SDR 73 300) for the milestone. Not scalable.

Allocated amount:

2,263,700

 

164 600

429 050

761 950

542 050

366 050

 

DLI  6: Timeliness and quality of fiduciary management

605,000

0

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

2 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

0 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

2 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

3 Timely Fiduciary reporting

 

3 Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary mngt

 

3 transparency of ACE expenses

 

3 quality of procurement planning

–   USD 15,000 (SDR 11 000) for timely fiduciary reporting

 

–   USD 15,000 (SDR 11 000) for Functional institutional oversight of fiduciary management

 

–   USD 15,000 (SDR 11 000) for transparency of ACE expenses

 

–   USD 15,000 (SDR 11 000) for Quality of procurement planning

Allocated amount:

605,000

 

88,000

132,000

132,000

121,000

132,000

 

DLI  7: Institutional Impact

1,631,300

0

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0

Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

1 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

3 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

3 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

0 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

 0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

0 Institutional accreditation steps

 

3 PASET Benchmarking

 

7

 Milestones on institutional impact

0 University regional strategy

 

0 Open and competitive selection of the head of university or dean

 

3 Institutional accreditation steps

 

0 PASET Benchmarking

 

3 Milestones on institutional impact

Not scalable.

University-wide regional strategy: USD 100,000 (SDR 73 300)

 

·  Open, merit-based competitive selection of the head of institution:

 

–   USD 200,000 (SDR 146 600)

–   USD 50,000 (SDR 36 700) for an open and merit-based competitive selection of a dean;

 

·  International Accreditation

–   USD 200,00 (SDR 146 600) for international accreditation;

–   USD 75,000 (SDR 55 000) each for gap assessment/self-evaluation.

 

·  PASET Benchmarking

–   USD 50,000 (SDR 36 700) for each year the university participates (up to 2 years)

 

·  Institutional Impact

–   USD 100,000 (SDR 73 300) per institutional impact milestone

Allocated amount:

1,631,300

 

0

183,400

165,000

623,200

659,700

 

Total IDA Financing

4,500,000

 

252,600

744,450

1,058,950

1,286,250

1,157,750

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 7.3 Overall Financing per Country and type of ACE

Selected Centers

DLI 1

Institutional Readiness

DLI 2

Development Impact

DLI 3

Students Enrolment

DLI 4

Education and Research Quality

DLI 5

Education and Research Relevance

DLI 6

Financial Management

DLI 7

Institutional impact

TOTAL

Burkina Faso (DLI 1 & 7 in SDR and DLI 2 to 6 in EURO)

In EURO

In SDR

1         

Center of Excellence for Training and Research in Water, Energy and Environment Sciences and Technologies in West and Central Africa (ACE-2iE)

0

174,640

639,675

1,091,660

929,285

262,000

376,000

3,097,260

376,000

2         

Center of Excellence for Social Risk Management – CESES

0

174,640

519,500

1,039,320

175,500

262,000

0

2,170,960

0

3         

Center of Excellence for Training, Research and Expertise in Drug Sciences of the University of Ouagadougou I

666,000

174,640

956,680

2,823,620

1,390,935

262,000

413,000

5,607,875

1,079,000

4         

Center of Excellence for Bio-technological Innovation for the Elimination of Vector- Borne Diseases of the Université Nazi Boni

666,000

174,640

956,680

2,823,620

1,390,935

262,000

413,000

5,607,875

1,079,000

5         

College of Engineering of the International Institute of Water and Environment Engineering 2iE

666,000

0

563,750

1,433,640

539,600

222,700

0

2,759,690

666,000

Djibouti (SDR)

1         

Emerging Center for Logistics and Transport of the University of Djibouti

647,120

201,320

785,990

1,819,100

909,620

323,550

377,475

5,064,175

2         

College of Engineering of the University of Djibouti

647,120

0

567,340

2,027,615

770,200

323,550

0

4,335,825

Ghana (SDR)

1         

West African Centre for Cell Biology of Infectious Pathogens of the University of Ghana Legon

0

172,560

775,500

1,081,285

1,253,900

316,400

143,800

3,743,445

2         

West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement of the University of Ghana Legon

0

172,560

775,500

1,081,285

1,253,900

316,400

197,725

3,797,370

3         

Regional Centre for Water and Environmental Sanitation of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology University

0

172,560

775,500

1,081,285

1,253,900

316,400

287,600

3,887,245

4         

Regional Transport Research and Education Center, of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

611,160

172,560

701,165

1,294,315

1,144,100

316,400

305,575

4,545,275

5         

Regional Center for Energy and Environmental Sustainability of the University of Energy & Natural Resources

611,160

172,560

701,165

1,294,315

1,144,100

316,400

557,225

4,796,925

6         

West African Center for Water, Irrigation and Sustainable Agriculture of the University of Development Studies

611,160

172,560

701,165

1,294,315

1,144,100

316,400

557,225

4,796,925

7         

Center of Excellence for Coastal Resilience of the University of Cape Coast

611,160

172,560

701,165

1,294,315

1,144,100

316,400

557,225

4,796,925

8         

West African Genetic Medicine Centre of the University of Ghana

611,160

172,560

701,165

1,294,315

1,144,100

316,400

395,450

4,635,150

9         

College of Engineering of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology

607,160

0

744,380

1,006,620

1,308,205

316,400

0

3,982,765

Guinea (SDR)

1         

Center of Excellence Prevention and Control of Communicable Diseases of the University of Gamal Abdel Nasser of Conakry

431,410

143,800

587,475

1,351,740

563,955

172,560

377,475

3,628,415

2         

Emerging Center for Mines and Societies of the Higher Institute of Mines and Geology of Boké

431,410

143,800

629,555

927,595

440,840

172,560

125,825

2,871,585

Senegal (EURO)

1         

Center of Excellence for Mathematics, Computer Science and ICT of the University of Gaston Berger

0

174,640

349,315

322,500

392,500

262,000

261,960

1,762,915

2         

Center of Excellence for Maternal and Infant Health of Cheikh Anta Diop University

0

174,640

349,315

322,500

392,500

262,000

174,640

1,675,595

3         

Center of Excellence for Environment and Health of Cheikh Anta Diop University

594,000

174,640

586,855

1,375,460

485,700

262,000

502,090

3,980,745

4         

Center of Excellence for Agriculture for Food and Nutrition Security of Cheikh Anta Diop University

594,000

174,640

586,855

1,375,460

485,700

262,000

502,090

3,980,745

Benin (DLI 1-4 & 7 in SDR and DLI 5&6 in Euros)

1

ACE: Mathematical Sciences, Computer Science and Applications, University of Abomey Calavi

 

0

0

0

0

1,135,875

252,000

0

1,387,875

2

ACE: Water and Sanitation (C2EA), University of Abomey Calavi

 

0

0

0

0

1,098,825

238,000

0

1,336,825

3

Collège of Engineering: Energy, Transport Infrastructures and Environment (CoE-EIE),University of Abomey Calavi

 

0

0

0

0

1,037,300

238,000

0

1,275,300

Cote D voire (Euro)

1

ACE: Mines and Mining Environment (CEA-MEM)

0

176,000

853,000

929,000

1,083,675

226,100

432,225

3,700,000

2

ACE: Valorization of Waste Products with High Value Added (VALOPRO)

670,000

176,000

899,325

1,866,000

1,018,350

226,100

344,225

5,200,000

3

ACE: Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Agriculture (CCBAD)

0

176,000

864,175

929,000

1,083,675

226,100

421,050

3,700,000

4

ACE: Statistics and Quantitative Economics (ENSEA)

0

176,000

864,175

929,000

1,083,675

226,100

421,050

3,700,000

The Ghambia (SDR)

1

Emerging Center: Science, Technology and Engineering for Entrepreneurship,

Gambia Technical Training Institute

 

990,000

264,000

1,247,000

2,615,200

824,000

374,000

384,850

6,700,000

Niger (DLI 1 to 4  in SDR and DLI 5 to 7 in EURO)

2

Emerging Center:  Innovative Teaching/Learning of Mathematics and the Sciences for SSA (CE-IEA-MS4SSA,

Université Abdou Moumouni

 

0

0

0

0

589,875

219,600

343,125

1,152,600

3

Emerging Center:  Mining Environment

EMIG

0

0

0

0

589,875

219,600

343,125

1,152,600

4

ACE: Pastoral Productions – Meat, Milk, Leather and Skins (CERPP),

Université Abdou Moumouni

 

0

0

0

0

740,575

219,600

434,625

1,394,800

Nigeria (SDR)

1

ACE: Genomics of Infectious Diseases (ACEGID), Redeemer’s University

0

146,600

717,500

696,650

1,188,200

198,000

714,700

3,661,650

2

ACE: Neglected Tropical Diseases and Forensic Biotechnology (ACENTDFB), Ahmadu Bello University

0

146,600

717,500

696,650

1,188,200

198,000

714,700

3,661,650

3

ACE: Reproductive Health Innovation (CERHI), University of Benin

0

146,600

717,500

696,650

1,188,200

198,000

714,700

3,661,650

4

ACE: Dry Land Agriculture (CDA), Bayero University, Kano

0

146,600

717,500

696,650

1,188,200

198,000

714,700

3,661,650

5         

ACE: Food Technology and Research (CEFTER) , Benue State University

0

146,600

717,500

696,650

1,188,200

198,000

714,700

3,661,650

6         

ACE: OAU ICT-DRIVEN KNOWLEDGE PARK (OAU-OAK), Obafemi Awolowo University

0

146,600

717,500

696,650

1,188,200

198,000

714,700

3,661,650

7         

ACE: Oilfield Chemicals Research (CEFOR), University of Port Harcourt

0

146,600

717,500

696,650

1,188,200

198,000

714,700

3,661,650

8         

ACE: Public Health and Toxicological Research, University of Port Harcourt

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

9         

ACE: Centre for Population Health and Policy, Bayero University, Kano

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

10       

ACE: Covenant Applied Informatics and Communication, Covenant University

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

11       

ACE: Technology Enhanced Learning (ACETEL), National Open University of Nigeria

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

12       

ACE: Innovative and Transformations Stem Education (CITSE), Lagos State University

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

13       

ACE: Mycotoxin and Food Safety, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

14       

ACE: Drug Research, Herbal Medicine Development and Regulatory Science, University of Lagos

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

15       

ACE: New Pedagogy in Engineering Education (ACENPEE), Ahmadu Belo University

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

16       

ACE: Sustainable Power and Energy Development (ACE_SPED), University of Nigeria Nsukka

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

17       

ACE: Future Energies and Electrochemical Systems, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria

440,000

146,600

614,000

1,451,900

858,401

187,000

714,700

4,412,601

Togo (DLI 1 to 4  in EURO and DLI 5 to 7 in SDR)

1

ACE: Poultry Science (CERSA),

University of Lomé

 

0

184,000

725,000

903,000

0

0

0

1,812,000

2

ACE: Power Management (CERME), University of Lomé

550,000

184,000

1,878,000

4,042,000

0

0

0

6,654,000

3

ACE: Sustainable Cities in Africa (DOUNEDON), University of Lomé

550,000

184,000

1,878,000

4,042,000

0

0

0

6,654,000


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